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New Synthetic Process Provides a Better View of Diabetes, Inflammation, and Human Aging

October 19, 2015

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New Process Provides a Better View of Diabetes, Inflammation, and Human Aging

In a newly published study, scientists describe the new synthesis, as well as a new synthetic methodology, that offers a better glimpse into diabetes and the aging process. A synthetic process developed at Yale University will allow researchers to study a key molecule involved in diabetes, inflammation, and human aging. The new process synthesizes glucosepane, […]

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Rare ALK Genetic Mutation Extends Cancer Survival

October 15, 2015

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Rare Genetic Mutation Extends Cancer Survival

A new study from Yale University reveals that patients with the rare ALK mutation are living an average of four years, compared to typical patients that die of NSCLC within seven months. Most patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has metastasized to the brain have a dire prognosis. But Yale researchers have identified […]

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Drinking Water Contamination Likely from Hydraulic Fracturing Surface Releases, Not Migration from Gas Wells or Deep Shale Layers

October 13, 2015

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Elevated Organic Compounds Found in Pennsylvania Drinking Water from Hydraulic Fracturing

Engineers at Yale University reveal that the presence of organic compounds in groundwater aquifers in Pennsylvania is likely the result of surface releases from hydraulic fracturing operations and not migration from gas wells or deep shale layers. In the largest study of its kind, a Yale-led investigation found no evidence that trace contamination of organic […]

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New Drug Significantly Reduces Mortality Rate After Stroke

October 12, 2015

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New Drug Significantly Cuts Mortality Rate After Stroke

New medical trials reveal that the intravenous drug Cirara significantly reduces brain swelling following a stroke. An existing drug administered intravenously reduces the chances of dying from major stroke by 60%, according to results of a phase II trial announced October 9 at the annual Neurocritical Care Society meeting in Scottsdale, Arizona. “We’ve never seen […]

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Yale Cardiologists Identify a Potential Therapeutic Target for Pulmonary Hypertension

October 8, 2015

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Cardiologists Identify Potential Therapeutic Target for Pulmonary Hypertension

In a newly published study, Yale scientists detail the discovery of a novel cell type that is essential to the development of pulmonary hypertension and promises to lead to improved therapies. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. As a prime example, pulmonary hypertension is especially lethal, with one-half of patients dying within […]

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Nanoparticulate Carbon Black Found in the Lungs of Smokers

October 7, 2015

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Nanoparticulate Carbon Black Particles Start Emphysema

Two new studies identify the black material found in the lungs of smokers who died of emphysema as mostly insoluble nanoparticulate carbon black. Physicians could only guess – until recently – at the composition of the black material found in the lungs of smokers who died of emphysema. But research by Baylor College of Medicine […]

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Machine-Learning Systems That Can Help Predict the Effects of Neurodegenerative Disease

October 6, 2015

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Engineers Are Building Computer Systems to Predict Alzheimer’s and Changes in the Brain

By combining MRI and other data, engineers from MIT are developing a computer system that uses genetic, demographic, and clinical data to help predict the effects of disease on brain anatomy. In experiments, they trained a machine-learning system on MRI data from patients with neurodegenerative diseases and found that supplementing that training with other patient […]

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Breakthrough Research May Lead to “Exercise in a Bottle”

October 2, 2015

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Exercise Blueprint Could Lead to New Drug Treatments That Mimic Exercise

New research from the University of Sydney reveals around 1000 molecular reactions to exercise, opening the door for drug treatments to mirror the health benefits of exercise. Drugs that mimic the benefits of exercise could soon become a reality thanks to breakthrough research from the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Center. Published in Cell Metabolism, […]

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Yale Researchers Reveal How HIV Spreads in Real Time

October 2, 2015

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Scientists Reveal How HIV Spreads in Real Time

In a newly published study, scientists from Yale University directly visualize how HIV and related retroviruses disseminate in secondary lymphoid tissues of living mice. How retroviruses like HIV spread in their hosts had been unknown — until a Yale team devised a way to watch it actually happen in a living organism. The elaborate and […]

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New Research Reveals How Flu Viruses Gain the Ability to Spread

October 1, 2015

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New Study Reveals How Flu Viruses Gain the Ability to Spread

In a new study, scientists reveal that the soft palate (the soft tissue at the back of the roof of the mouth) plays a key role in viruses’ ability to travel through the air from one person to another. The findings, described in the September 23 online edition of Nature, should help scientists better understand […]

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Bioadhesive Nanoparticles Help Protect Your Skin From the Sun

September 28, 2015

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New Sunblock With Bioadhesive Nanoparticles

Dermatologists from Yale University have developed a new sunscreen made with bioadhesive nanoparticles that doesn’t penetrate the skin, eliminating serious health concerns associated with commercial sunscreens. Most commercial sunblocks are good at preventing sunburn, but they can go below the skin’s surface and enter the bloodstream. As a result, they pose possible hormonal side effects […]

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Yeast Protein Reveals Clues to How Alzheimer’s Forms

September 25, 2015

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Yeast Protein Offers Clues to How Alzheimer’s Disease Begins

In a newly published study, biologists from MIT detail how a yeast protein may lead to anti-amyloid therapeutic opportunities. Fibrous protein clumps known as amyloids are most often associated with diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, where they form characteristic plaques in the brain. Scientists first described amyloids about 150 years ago; they have since been […]

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Scientists Report a Major Breakthrough in Alzheimer’s Disease

September 20, 2015

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Researchers Report a Major Breakthrough in Alzheimer's Disease

New research sheds light on a fundamental mechanism underlying the development of Alzheimer’s disease and could lead to new forms of therapy people with the disease. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia globally and affects up to 40,000 people in Ireland today. It is the fourth leading cause of death in individuals over […]

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One In Five High School E-Cigarette Users Vaporize Cannabis

September 8, 2015

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Nearly One In Five E-Cigarette Users Vaporize Cannabis

New research from Yale University shows that nearly one in five high school e-cigarette users also have used the device to vaporize cannabis or byproducts like hash oil. E-cigarettes not only vaporize nicotine, but they work with marijuana as well, American teenagers are discovering. Yale University researchers surveyed 3,847 Connecticut high school students by Yale […]

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New Model Captures Shape and Speed of Tumor Growth for the First Time

August 31, 2015

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Model Captures Shape and Speed of Tumor Growth for the First Time

Scientists at Harvard have developed the first model of solid tumor growth that reflects both shape and growth. They’re among the most powerful tools for demonstrating how cancer grows and spreads, but mathematical models of the disease have always faced an either/or problem. Models for capturing the spatial — or 3D — aspects of tumors […]

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Yale Study Shows One in Four Hepatitis C Patients Denied Initial Drug Therapy

August 28, 2015

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Yale Study Shows One in Four Hepatitis C Patients Denied Initial Care

A new study from the Yale School of Medicine found that nearly one in four patients with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) are denied initial approval for a drug therapy that treats the most common strain of the infection. The finding, published August 27 in PLOS ONE, identifies a new barrier to caring for patients with […]

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Light from Phones or Tablets Suppresses Melatonin Production in Young Teens

August 26, 2015

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Light from Phones or Tablets Disturbs the Sleep of Young Teens

A new study from Brown University examines the effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep, revealing that light from phones or tablets suppressed their production of the sleep-timing hormone melatonin significantly. Brown University — A new study has an important implication for tweens and young teens as they head back […]

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Harvard Researchers Explain the Reason for Genetic Obesity

August 25, 2015

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Researchers Explain the Reason for Genetic Obesity

Researchers from Harvard Medical School and MIT reeval a genetic circuit that controls whether our bodies burn or store fat. Like many other conditions, obesity is caused by an interplay between genetic and environmental factors. While efforts to combat the obesity epidemic will need to include changes in diet and exercise, insights into the genes […]

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