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New Research Identifies Enzyme Crucial to the Shaping and Division of Brain Cells

January 5, 2015

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Study Identifies Enzyme Crucial to the Shaping and Division of Brain Cells

A newly published study identifies a “cutting” enzyme crucial to the shaping and division of brain cells as well as the replenishment of neural stem cells. The study, appearing online December 17 in the journal Neuron, helps explain the molecular basis of complex brain abnormalities, including small brain size (microcephaly) observed in children who were […]

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Study Shows Digital Books Can Adversely Impact Overall Health

December 31, 2014

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E-Readers Foil Good Night’s Sleep

A newly published study from Harvard Medical School reveals that using light-emitting electronic devices before bedtime can adversely impact overall health. Use of a light-emitting electronic book (LE-eBook) in the hours before bedtime can adversely impact overall health, alertness and the circadian clock, which synchronizes the daily rhythm of sleep to external environmental time cues, […]

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2014 – A look Back on a Significant Year for NASA

December 29, 2014

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Kepler-186f

As 2014 comes to a close this short video and pictures look back on a few of the events that took place this year at NASA. In 2014, NASA took significant steps on the agency’s journey to Mars — testing cutting-edge technologies and making scientific discoveries while studying our changing Earth and the infinite universe […]

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Martian Rock Reveals a Record of the Planet’s Climate

December 23, 2014

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New Analysis of a Martian Rock Reveals Climate Clues

New research on a Martian rock reveals a record of the planet’s climate billions of years ago, back when water likely washed across its surface and any life that ever formed there might have emerged. Scientists from the University of California, San Diego, NASA and the Smithsonian Institution report detailed measurements of minerals within the […]

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New Research Shows Vocalizing Birds Could Tell Us More About Speech Disorders

December 23, 2014

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Birdsong Could Help Solve Stuttering

New genomics research from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory suggests vocalizing birds could tell us more about speech disorders. Think that sparrow whistling outside your bedroom window is nothing more than pleasant background noise? A new paper from a researcher at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) suggests that we can […]

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Yale Study Shows Strong Neighborhood Relationships Can Help Reduce Gun Violence

December 22, 2014

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Yale Study Strong Neighborhood Relationships Can Help Reduce Gun Violence

New research presented at the Institute of Medicine’s Means of Violence workshop shows that strong neighborhood ties can help reduce gun violence. The bonds that tie a neighborhood together can help shield community members from gun violence, according to new findings by Yale School of Medicine researchers in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars […]

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New Computer Neural Networks Identify As Well As The Primate Brain

December 19, 2014

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New Computer Neural Networks Can Visually Identify as Well as the Primate Brain

A new study from MIT neuroscientists shows that the newest computer neural networks can identify visual objects as well as the primate brain. For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual skills such as recognizing objects, which the human brain does very accurately and quickly. Until now, no computer […]

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Targeted Computer Games Improve Neurobiological Dysfunctions of Psychopaths

December 18, 2014

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Study Shows Computer Games Can Change the Behavior of Psychopaths

New research from Yale University shows that computer games can be used to change the behavior of psychopaths, teaching them to consider emotion and other pieces of information when they make decisions. Psychopaths generally do not feel fear and fail to consider the emotions of others, or reflect upon their behavior — traits that make […]

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Aquilops Americanus – Oldest Known Species of Horned Dinosaur from North America

December 12, 2014

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Aquilops Americanus Oldest Horned North American Dinosaur

A team of paleontologists has discovered the oldest known “horned” dinosaur fossil from North America. Named Aquilops americanus, the species is 40 million years older than the iconic Triceratops. A fossil skull small enough to fit in the palm of your hand represents the oldest species of horned dinosaur named from North America. The discovery, […]

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Neuroscientists Reveal Fundamental Discovery about Cortical Neurons

December 11, 2014

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Neuroscientists Reveal Fundamental Discovery about Cortical Neurons

Neuroscientists from the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory uncover a fundamental discovery about cortical neurons, showing that inhibitory neuron functionality is not an immutable property of cortical cells, but a consequence of more complex network dynamics. The two major types of neuron in the brain’s cerebral cortex are connected by intricate cortical circuits that […]

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Brain’s Response to Smoking is Different in Men and Women

December 10, 2014

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Men and Women Respond Differently to Cigarettes

New research from Yale University shows that men and women respond to cigarettes differently, demonstrating for the first time that smoking-induced dopamine activation occurs in a different brain region and much faster in nicotine-dependent men than women. Yale researchers using a new brain imaging analysis method have confirmed that smoking cigarettes activates a dopamine-driven pleasure […]

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Toxic Fruits Increases Fertility in Female Drosophila Sechellia Flies

December 9, 2014

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Dopamine Precursor in Toxic Fruits Increases Fertility

In a new study, researchers from the Max Planck Institute reveal that a dopamine precursor in the toxic fruits of the morinda tree increases fertility in female Drosophila sechellia flies. In the course of evolution, animals have become adapted to certain food sources, sometimes even to plants or to fruits that are actually toxic. The […]

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New NASA Goddard Video: Moon Phase and Libration, 2015

December 9, 2014

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Moon Phase and Libration 2015

This new five minute video from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center shows the upcoming moon phases for 2015 as viewed from the northern hemisphere. NASA | Moon Phases 2015, Northern Hemisphere This visualization shows the Moon’s phase and libration at hourly intervals throughout 2015, as viewed from the northern hemisphere. Each frame represents one […]

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New Computer Model Designs Complicated 3D Structures from DNA

December 4, 2014

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MIT Engineers Design Complex DNA Shapes

Biological engineers from MIT have developed a new computer model that enables them to design the most complicated 3D structures ever made from DNA, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles. This design program could allow researchers to build DNA scaffolds to anchor arrays of proteins and light-sensitive molecules […]

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Unlike People, Capuchin Monkeys Aren’t Fooled by Expensive Brands

December 3, 2014

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Monkeys Aren’t Fooled by Expensive Brands

A newly published study from Yale University shows that although Capuchin monkeys exhibit a number of irrational behaviors similar to humans, the monkeys aren’t fooled by expensive brands. In at least one respect, Capuchin monkeys are smarter than humans — they don’t assume a higher price tag means better quality, according to a new Yale […]

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Jupiter’s Great Red Spot – Just a Sunburn?

December 2, 2014

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Research Shows Sunlight Produces the Color of Jupiter's Great Red Spot

Using a combination of data from Cassini’s December 2000 Jupiter flyby and laboratory experiments, new research suggests effects of sunlight produce the color of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. The ruddy color of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is likely a product of simple chemicals being broken apart by sunlight in the planet’s upper atmosphere, according to […]

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Microbullets Demonstrate Graphene’s Energy Absorbing Strength

December 1, 2014

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Microbullets Confirm the Strength of Graphene

A newly published study from Rice University shows that graphene is 10 times better than steel at absorbing the energy of a penetrating projectile. Graphene’s great strength appears to be determined by how well it stretches before it breaks, according to Rice University scientists who tested the material’s properties by peppering it with microbullets. The […]

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Mysterious Ecosystem May Hold Clues to Alien Life

November 26, 2014

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Deep Sea Shrimp May Hold Clues to Alien Life

Scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory reveal that the extreme oasis of life deep in the Caribbean Sea may hold clues to life on other planetary bodies, including Jupiter’s moon Europa. At one of the world’s deepest undersea hydrothermal vents, tiny shrimp are piled on top of each other, layer upon layer, crawling on rock […]

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