January 22, 2015

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Gullies Suggest Water Flowed on the Surface of Vesta

Gullies Suggest Past Water on Vesta

A newly published study shows evidence that transient water flowed on the surface of Vesta, in a debris-flow-like process, and left distinctive geomorphologic features. Protoplanet Vesta, visited by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft from 2011 to 2013, was once thought to be completely dry, incapable of retaining water because of the low temperatures and pressures at its […]

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January 22, 2015

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NASA Data Reveal Subglacial Lakes Refilling in Greenland

Subglacial Lakes Seen Refilling in Greenland

New research found evidence of a drained and refilled subglacial lake in Greenland, revealing that surface meltwater can be trapped and stored at the bed of an ice sheet. Sensible and latent heat released by this trapped meltwater could soften nearby colder basal ice and alter downstream ice dynamics. Scientists using satellite images and data […]

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January 21, 2015

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Milky Way Could Be a “Galactic Transport System”

Milky Way Could Be a Giant Wormhole

A newly published theory reveals that the Milky Way could contain a space-time tunnel, and that the tunnel could even be the size of the galaxy itself. Based on the latest evidence and theories our galaxy could be a huge wormhole (or space-time tunnel, have you seen “Interstellar?”) and, if that were true, it would […]

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January 21, 2015

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MIT Research Reveals Natural Impediment to Long-Term Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

Study Finds Natural Impediment to Long-Term Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

A new study reveals a natural impediment to the long-term sequestration of carbon dioxide, showing that as carbon dioxide works its way underground only a small fraction of the gas turns to rock. The remainder of the gas stays in a more tenuous form. Carbon sequestration promises to address greenhouse-gas emissions by capturing carbon dioxide […]

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January 21, 2015

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A Way To Self-Propel Subatomic Particles Without External Forces

Study Shows How to Self-Propel Subatomic Particles

Using a new variation on the methods used to bend light, a team of physicists reveal that subatomic particles can be induced to speed up all by themselves without the application of any external forces. Some physical principles have been considered immutable since the time of Isaac Newton: Light always travels in straight lines. No […]

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January 21, 2015

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Conformational Changes of EF-G on the Ribosome During tRNA Translocation

Study Shows Ribosomal Motor is Crucial Part of Cellular Protein Factory

New research from Yale University provides insights into the conformational space that EF-G samples on the ribosome and reveals that tRNA translocation on the ribosome is facilitated by a structural transition of EF-G from a compact to an elongated conformation, which can be prevented by the antibiotic dityromycin. The ribosome is the protein-making “factory” within […]

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January 21, 2015

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SDO Collects Its 100-Millionth Image of the Sun

SDO Collects Its 100-Millionth Image

On January 19, 2015, at 12:49 p.m. EST, the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured its 100 millionth image of the sun. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, or AIA, uses four telescopes working parallel to gather eight images of the sun – cycling through 10 different wavelengths — every 12 seconds. Between the […]

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January 21, 2015

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LBTI Completes First Study of Dust in the “Habitable Zone”

LBTI Views a Dusty Star

The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer has completed its first study of dust in the “habitable zone” around a star, opening a new door to finding planets like Earth. The findings will help in the design of future space missions that have the goal of taking pictures of planets similar to Earth, called exo-Earths. “Kepler told […]

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January 20, 2015

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Magnetic Fields in Dark Clouds Help Form Massive Stars

Astronomers Observe Polarized Dust Emission of Two Dark Clouds

A new study shows for the first time that high magnetization sets the stage for the formation of massive stars with 8 solar masses or more. Magnetic fields in massive dark clouds are strong enough to support the regions against collapse due to their own gravity. A study lead by researchers at the Max Planck […]

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January 20, 2015

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A Link between Inflammation and Cancer

Study Details a Link Between Inflammation and Cancer

New research from MIT reveals a link between inflammation and cancer, showing that the timing of inflammation determines whether potentially cancerous mutations may arise. A new study from MIT reveals one reason why people who suffer from chronic inflammatory diseases such as colitis have a higher risk of mutations that cause cancer. The researchers also […]

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January 20, 2015

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Geophysicists Find Source Behind “Sudden” Tectonic Plate Movements

Geophysicists Reveal the Details Behind Sudden Tectonic Plate Movements

Geophysicists from Yale University reveal that the combination of crustal plugs with weakening causes abrupt slab detachment in a few million years, which can account for observed precipitous changes in plate tectonic motion and rapid continental uplift. Yale-led research may have solved one of the biggest mysteries in geology — namely, why do tectonic plates […]

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January 20, 2015

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Earth’s Earliest Primates Lived in Trees

Earth’s Earliest Primates Lived in Trees

New research from Yale University reveals that Earth’s earliest primates lived in trees. Earth’s earliest primates have taken a step up in the world, now that researchers have gotten a good look at their ankles. A new study has found that Purgatorius, a small mammal that lived on a diet of fruit and insects, was […]

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January 20, 2015

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New JPL Video: Approaching Titan a Billion Times Closer

Cassini Color Mosaic of Titan

A new three minute video uses data collected by Cassini’s imaging cameras and the Huygens Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer to better detail Saturn’s moon Titan. Approaching Titan a Billion Times Closer Remember the Titan (Landing): Ten years ago today, January 14, 2005, the Huygens probe touched down on Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. This new, narrated movie […]

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January 20, 2015

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NASA’s Dawn Spacecraft Closes in on Ceres, Delivers New Images

Dawn Spacecraft Closes in on Ceres

NASA’s Dawn spacecraft has captured new images of dwarf planet Ceres. As NASA’s Dawn spacecraft closes in on Ceres, new images show the dwarf planet at 27 pixels across, about three times better than the calibration images taken in early December. These are the first in a series of images that will be taken for […]

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January 19, 2015

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Hubble Views the Dust Filaments of Spiral Galaxy NGC 4217

New Hubble Image of NGC 4217

In this newly released image, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope takes a close look at the spiral galaxy NGC 4217 – which is located 60 million light-years away. The galaxy is seen almost perfectly edge on and is a perfect candidate for studying the nature of extraplanar dust structures — the patterns of gas and dust […]

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January 16, 2015

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A Significant Step Towards Explaining the Cosmic Origins of the Seeds of Galaxies

3D Simulation Shows Small Protostellar-Like Core Can Grow into a Supermassive Black Hole

In a new study, astronomers from Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics found that a small protostellar-like core of only 0.1 solar-masses can develop in only a few years from a suitable environment and then can grow into a supermassive black hole in only millions of years. Supermassive black holes with millions or billions of solar-masses of […]

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January 16, 2015

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New Technique Enlarges Tissue Samples, Making Them Easier to Image

New Technique Enables Nanoscale-Resolution Microscopy

By physically enlarging the specimen itself, researchers from MIT have invented a new way to visualize the nanoscale structure of the brain and other tissues. Beginning with the invention of the first microscope in the late 1500s, scientists have been trying to peer into preserved cells and tissues with ever-greater magnification. The latest generation of […]

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