January 17, 2013

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Elephants Are More Likely to Die at the Hands of Humans than from Natural Causes

Elephants in Kenyas Samburu Region

According to a 14-year study, adult elephants in northern Kenya are more likely to die at the hands of humans than from natural causes. George Wittemyer, a wildlife biologist at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, and lead author of the study, published the findings in the journal PLOS ONE. The Scientists began the study in […]

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January 17, 2013

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NASA’S Webb Telescope Edges Closer to Liftoff

Artist Conception of NASAs James Webb Space Telescope

The most powerful space telescope ever built, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is still is on track for an October 2018 liftoff as it met another milestone recently. The Webb Telescope is a joint project between NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency and will be the successor to the Hubble Space […]

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January 16, 2013

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Soot’s Role in Climate Change Underestimated

Soots Impact on Climate Change Underestimated

A new comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the role of black carbon, aka soot, in the climate system found that the direct warming effect of black carbon could be about twice that of previous estimates. Soot is the second largest man made contributor to global warming and its influence on climate has been greatly underestimated, […]

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January 16, 2013

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Study Finds that “Whole Grain” Foods Aren’t Always a Healthy Choice

New Study Evaluates the Healthfulness of Whole Grain Foods

A new study from scientists at the Harvard School of Public Health is the first to empirically evaluate the healthfulness of whole-grain foods based on five commonly used industry and government definitions, finding that the Whole Grain Stamp on food doesn’t always mean it’s a healthy choice. Current standards for classifying foods as “whole grain” […]

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January 16, 2013

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Marine Bacteria Are Not Homogenous Populations in the Ocean

Bipolar Distribution of Marine Bacteria

New research from scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory shows that marine bacteria are not just homogenous populations in the ocean and that different bacteria prefer certain temperatures, levels of nutrients, light and salinity. Woods Hole, Massachusetts — In another blow to the “Everything is Everywhere” tenet of bacterial distribution in the ocean, scientists at […]

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January 16, 2013

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A Step Towards a Possible Alzheimer’s Vaccine, Researchers Eliminate up to 80% of Senile Plaques in Mice

A Major Step Toward an Alzheimers Vaccine

Researchers at the Université Laval have shown that the molecule MPL (monophosphoryl lipid A) can eliminate up to 80% of the senile plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease when injected into mice. The researchers believe that it could be administered to Alzheimer’s patients to slow the progression of the disease and to stimulate their natural immunity. […]

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January 16, 2013

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Sulfur Cathodes Set a World Record for Energy Storage

World Record Battery Performance

Using a sulfur cathode made of nanoparticles where each tiny sulfur nugget is surrounded by a hard shell of porous titanium dioxide, researchers at Stanford University designed a cathode that can store five times more energy than today’s commercial technology and set a world record for energy storage along the way. SLAC and Stanford scientists […]

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January 16, 2013

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New ESO Image Shows Lupus 3

Lupus 3 A Dark Cloud Where New Stars Are Forming

A new image from the European Southern Observatory shows Lupus 3, a cloud that contains huge amounts of cool cosmic dust and a place where new stars are forming. An evocative new image from ESO shows a dark cloud where new stars are forming, along with a cluster of brilliant stars that have already emerged […]

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January 16, 2013

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DARPA Demonstrates the Most Complex 2D Optical Phased Array Ever

New 2D Optical Phased Array Technology

By developing new microfabrication techniques, scientists at DARPA have integrated all the components of an optical phased array into a miniature 2-D chip configuration, which may enable advanced LADAR and other defense applications. Most people are familiar with the concept of RADAR. Radio frequency (RF) waves travel through the atmosphere, reflect off of a target, […]

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January 16, 2013

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Curiosity Preparing to Drill into First Martian Rock

Flat Lying Rock Selected as the First Drilling Site for NASAs Curiosity Rover

If all goes as planned, NASA’s Curiosity rover may drill its first rock sample in the coming days, providing scientists with important details about the planets past history. Pasadena, California — NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity is driving toward a flat rock with pale veins that may hold clues to a wet history on the Red […]

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January 15, 2013

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UCLA Study Shows Childhood Obesity Linked to More Health Problems than Previously Thought

Dr.-Neal-Halfon

By analyzing data on over 43,000 children between the ages 10 and 17, new research from UCLA shows that obese children are at nearly twice the risk of having three or more reported medical, mental or developmental conditions as compared to kids who are not overweight. While a great deal of research on childhood obesity […]

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January 15, 2013

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Gene Flow Between Indian Populations and Australia Occurred 4,000 Years Ago

Gene-flow-from-India-to-Australia

A newly published study led by researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology found evidence that substantial gene flow between Indian populations and Australia occurred about 4,000 years ago. Australia is thought to have remained largely isolated between its initial colonization around 40,000 years ago and the arrival of Europeans in the late […]

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