November 9, 2012

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New Emperor Penguin Colonies Discovered in Antarctica

emperor penguin colony

Scientists observed two new colonies totaling 6,000 emperor penguin chicks near Mertz Glacier in Antarctica, raising the estimated population in this area to about three fold of what was previously thought. While about 2500 chicks of emperor penguins are raised this year at the colony close to the French Dumont d’Urville Station, two new colonies […]

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November 9, 2012

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Trillions of Comet Collisions Explain 17-Year-Old Stellar Mystery

Comet collisions explain 17-year-old stellar mystery

In a recently published study, scientists propose that the mysterious gas orbiting 49 CETI is similar to the sun’s Kuiper Belt and is a result of trillions of comets bashing into one another. Every six seconds, for millions of years, comets have been colliding with one another near a star in the constellation Cetus called […]

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November 9, 2012

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ASKAP Telescope Predicted to Find 700,000 New Galaxies

simulated galaxies ASKAP surveys WALLABY and DINGO

Scientists are predicting that the new ASKAP galaxy surveys, WALLABY and DINGO, will find an amazing 700,000 new galaxies, spread over trillions of cubic light years of space. Australia’s newest radio telescope is predicted to find an unprecedented 700,000 new galaxies, say scientists planning for CSIRO’s next-generation Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). In a […]

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November 9, 2012

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Fermentation Process for Making Explosives Helps Boost Biofuel Production

Fermentation Process to Boost Biofuel Production

Using a fermentation process used in World War I to make cordite for bullets and artillery shells, researchers at the Berkeley Lab effectively combined an old fermentation process with new chemical catalysis to boost biofuel production. A fermentation technique once used to make cordite, the explosive propellant that replaced gunpowder in bullets and artillery shells, […]

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November 9, 2012

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Planetary Nebula Fleming 1 Likely Has Two White Dwarfs Circling Each Other at its Center

the planetary nebula Fleming 1

Using ESO’s Very Large Telescope, a team of astronomers discovered that Fleming 1 is likely to have two white dwarfs at its center, circling each other every 1.2 days. Astronomers using ESO’s Very Large Telescope have discovered a pair of stars orbiting each other at the center of one of the most remarkable examples of […]

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November 8, 2012

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Analysis of 2011 Virginia Earthquake Suggests Seismic Risk

earthquake-consequence-virginia

Last year, the surprise 5.8-magnitude earthquake that struck central Virginia was actually worse than previously thought. Detailed analyses of the ground motions triggered by the event indicate that Washington DC and other affected regions could be at higher risk of major ground movement. The event triggered landslides over a wider area than any other recorded […]

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November 8, 2012

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Proteins Engineered With Predictable Structures

protein-folidng

Proteins fold spontaneously into precise conformation, time after time, optimized by evolution. Yet given the number of contortions possible for chains of amino acids, dictating how a sequence will fold itself into a predicable structure has been a daunting task. Researchers have been able to accomplish this feat. The scientists published their findings in the […]

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November 8, 2012

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New Earth-Like Planet HD 40307g May Be Capable of Supporting Life

artist's impression shows HD40307g

An international team of astronomers has discovered a new Earth-like planet, known as HD 40307g, that may be capable of supporting life and is located forty-two light years from Earth. A new super-Earth planet that may have an Earth-like climate and be just right to support life has been discovered around a nearby star by […]

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November 8, 2012

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Stone Blades Suggest that Early Humans Passed on Technological Skills

native-american-microlith

Archaeologists have discovered some new stone blades from a cave from South Africa that seem to indicate that early humans were already quite adapt at crafting blades. The scientists published their findings in the journal Nature. The tiny blades are no longer than 3 cm in length were used as tips for throwable spears or […]

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November 8, 2012

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Methane Consuming Microorganisms Exhibit a Strange Diet

methane consuming microorganisms

Scientists at MARUM and the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology explore the unique diets of methane consuming microorganisms. Methane is formed under the absence of oxygen by natural biological and physical processes, e.g. in the sea floor. It is a much more powerful greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. Thanks to the activity of microorganisms […]

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November 8, 2012

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Smilodon’s Distinctive Fangs Still Puzzling to Paleontologists

smilodon-utah-fangs

The extinct genus Smilodon encompasses three species, and they are part of North American’s vanished megafauna. While the carnivore broadly resembles other Felidae, its fangs have been somewhat of a mystery for paleontologists, especially in the family’s largest species, Smilodon populator, which had 12 inch canines. Smilodon lived in North and South America during the […]

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November 8, 2012

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Study Links Dietary Glycemic Load and Colon Cancer

high-carb diet and recurrence of colon cancer

A newly published study found that a diet heavy in complex sugars and carbohydrate-rich foods is likely to lead to a recurrence of colorectal cancer in previous patients. Colon cancer survivors whose diet is heavy in complex sugars and carbohydrate-rich foods are far more likely to have a recurrence of the disease than are patients […]

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