January 18, 2013

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Black Silicon Improves the Efficiency of Solar Cells

Black Silicon Can Improve the Efficiency of Solar Cells

In a newly published study, researchers from Aalto University show that black silicon can improve the efficiency of solar cells by improving the light absorption and surface passivation. Scientists at Aalto University have demonstrated results that show a huge improvement in the light absorption and the surface passivation of silicon nanostructures. This has been achieved […]

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January 18, 2013

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Nanoscale Coating Repels Virtually Any Liquid

A New Coating Developed at the University of Michigan Can Repel Virtually Any Liquid

Engineers at the University of Michigan have developed a nanoscale coating that can repel virtually any liquid, possibly leading to breathable protective wear for soldiers and scientists, as well as stain-proof garments. Ann Arbor — A nanoscale coating that’s at least 95 percent air repels the broadest range of liquids of any material in its […]

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January 18, 2013

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Windblown Sand is Changing Titan’s Surface

Weather on Titan Has Modified Its Surface

Data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has allowed scientists to put together the first quantitative estimate of how much the weather on Titan has modified its surface, finding that the craters on Titan were on average hundreds of meters shallower than similarly sized craters on Jupiter’s moon Ganymede. Titan’s siblings must be jealous. While most of […]

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January 17, 2013

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UCLA Researchers Show Link Between Diet, Genetics and Obesity

Obesity and Genetics

Researchers at UCLA have shown that body-fat responses to high-fat, high-sugar diets have a very strong genetic component and have identified several genetic factors potentially regulating these responses. Researchers at UCLA say it’s not just what you eat that makes those pants tighter — it’s also genetics. In a new study, scientists discovered that body-fat […]

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January 17, 2013

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Conceptual Nuclear Reactor Design of High Plutonium Breeding by Light Water Cooling

High Plutonium Breeding by Light Water Cooling

A new study details how scientists developed the conceptual nuclear reactor design of high plutonium breeding by light water cooling, which may help advanced countries meet the growth rate of energy demand. Professor Oka’s research team succeeded to develop the conceptual nuclear reactor design of high plutonium breeding by light water cooling for the first […]

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January 17, 2013

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New Study Suggests that Black Holes are Growing Faster than Previously Thought

Black Holes Grow Faster Than Expected

A study from astronomers at the Swinburne University of Technology suggests that black holes have been growing much faster than previously thought. Astronomers from Swinburne University of Technology have discovered how supermassive black holes grow – and it’s not what was expected. For years, scientists had believed that supermassive black holes, located at the centers […]

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January 17, 2013

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Plants May Not be Able to Keep Pace with Warming Temperatures

Unprecedented Flowering Follows a Record Warmth

A team of researchers examined the relationship between global climate warming and the flowering of spring plants, finding that spring plants may continue to flower earlier and earlier until they reach a point where they miss their primary pollinators. Record warmth in 2010 and 2012 resulted in similarly extraordinary spring flowering in the eastern United […]

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January 17, 2013

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Theoretical Physicists Devise Rules for More Effective Teleportation

Rules for More Effective Teleportation

In a newly published study, a team of theoretical physicists from Cambridge, University College London and the University of Gdansk detail a generalized form of teleportation that allows for a wide variety of potential applications in quantum physics. For the last ten years, theoretical physicists have shown that the intense connections generated between particles as […]

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January 17, 2013

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Hubble Views the Large Magellanic Cloud and its Star Forming Regions

The Large Magellanic Cloud

This Hubble Space Telescope image shows the Large Magellanic Cloud and the many star-forming regions within it. Nearly 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, floats in space, in a long and slow dance around our galaxy. Vast clouds of gas within it slowly collapse to form […]

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January 17, 2013

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Elephants Are More Likely to Die at the Hands of Humans than from Natural Causes

Elephants in Kenyas Samburu Region

According to a 14-year study, adult elephants in northern Kenya are more likely to die at the hands of humans than from natural causes. George Wittemyer, a wildlife biologist at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, and lead author of the study, published the findings in the journal PLOS ONE. The Scientists began the study in […]

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January 17, 2013

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NASA’S Webb Telescope Edges Closer to Liftoff

Artist Conception of NASAs James Webb Space Telescope

The most powerful space telescope ever built, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is still is on track for an October 2018 liftoff as it met another milestone recently. The Webb Telescope is a joint project between NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency and will be the successor to the Hubble Space […]

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January 16, 2013

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Soot’s Role in Climate Change Underestimated

Soots Impact on Climate Change Underestimated

A new comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the role of black carbon, aka soot, in the climate system found that the direct warming effect of black carbon could be about twice that of previous estimates. Soot is the second largest man made contributor to global warming and its influence on climate has been greatly underestimated, […]

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January 16, 2013

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Study Finds that “Whole Grain” Foods Aren’t Always a Healthy Choice

New Study Evaluates the Healthfulness of Whole Grain Foods

A new study from scientists at the Harvard School of Public Health is the first to empirically evaluate the healthfulness of whole-grain foods based on five commonly used industry and government definitions, finding that the Whole Grain Stamp on food doesn’t always mean it’s a healthy choice. Current standards for classifying foods as “whole grain” […]

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January 16, 2013

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Marine Bacteria Are Not Homogenous Populations in the Ocean

Bipolar Distribution of Marine Bacteria

New research from scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory shows that marine bacteria are not just homogenous populations in the ocean and that different bacteria prefer certain temperatures, levels of nutrients, light and salinity. Woods Hole, Massachusetts — In another blow to the “Everything is Everywhere” tenet of bacterial distribution in the ocean, scientists at […]

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