December 26, 2012

3 Comments

FDA Approves AquaBounty Transgenic Fish

AquAdvantage Salmon

The US FDA has finally approved the first genetically engineered animals for human consumption. The fast-growing salmon has been assessed as safe by the FDA. After 60 days of public comment, the FDA may issue a final assessment and approval, at which time the company AquaBounty, of Maynard, Massachusetts, can start selling the fish. The […]

Continue reading...

December 26, 2012

1 Comment

Stem Cells Help Restore a Man’s Vision

Doctors at Toronto Western Hospital preform a stem cell transplant to help a patient regain their sight. Credit: CTV News

Taylor Binns began slowly going blind because of complications with his contact lenses. However, an innovative treatment using stem cells has allowed him to regain his sight. While on humanitarian work in Haiti, Binns developed intense eye pain and increasingly blurry vision. Over the next two years, Binns slowly went legally blind, with his doctors […]

Continue reading...

December 26, 2012

0 Comments

Princeton’s Nanomesh Triples Solar Cell Efficiency

Credit: Jumanji Solar

Researchers at Princeton University have used nanotechnology to develop a nanotechnological mesh that increases efficiency over organic solar cells nearly threefold. The scientists published their findings in the journal Optics Express¹. The team was able to reduce reflexivity and capture more of the light that isn’t reflected. The resulting solar cell is thinner, less reflective […]

Continue reading...

December 24, 2012

0 Comments

Only About 1,000 Yangtze Finless Porpoises Remain

Finless Porpoise at Miyajima Aquarium, Japan. Credit: ori2uru/Flickr

A six-week survey of the Yangtze River’s middle and lower stretches by the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) in Wuhan and the conservation group WWF in China has concluded that the Yangtze finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis) are being driven to the brink of extinction by fishing, pollution and other human activities. […]

Continue reading...

December 24, 2012

0 Comments

Toxic Algal Blooms Could be Boosted by Climate Change

Pseudo-nitzschia is among the species that produce toxins and cause harmful algal blooms. Credit: Courtesy of Raphael Kudela, UCSC

Physical and chemical conditions in the oceans cause populations of algae to wax and wane in cycles. Harmful algae consist of only a few species of diatoms, dinoflagellates, and cyanobacteria. Researchers are wondering what the role of climate change is in the algal blooms that have been seen in the last years. Some harmful algae […]

Continue reading...

December 24, 2012

2 Comments

Depression is the Top Disability Among US & Canadian Teens

Credit: Shuttershock

According to a new study led by researchers at the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington in Seattle, depression has surpassed asthma as the largest contributor to ‘years lived with disabilities’ for youths aged 10 -14. The scientists published their findings in the journal The Lancet¹. The estimation of […]

Continue reading...

December 24, 2012

1 Comment

Masers as Evolutionary Indicators for Star Formation

methanol masers

SAO astronomers provide the first unambiguous evidence that Class I masers may be excited by both young (hot core) and older (UC H II) MYSOs within the same protocluster. Astronomers have come to realize that the process of star formation, once thought to consist essentially of just the simple coalescence of material by gravity, occurs […]

Continue reading...

December 24, 2012

0 Comments

Urine Used as Fertilizer to Boost Crop Yields

Roshan Shrestha of UN-HABITAT inaugurates urine bank in Siddhipur, Nepal. Credit: Flickr/Sustainable sanitation

Last year, in Sotang, Nepal, the Dzi Foundation helped build over 1,000 toilets for the nearly 6,500 residents of the village. The villagers were given the option of using a regular squatting pan or a dual-hole pan, which allowed for the collection of urine to be used as a fertilizer. Urine is mostly water, mixed […]

Continue reading...

December 24, 2012

1 Comment

Area of Monkey Brain Keeps Tally of Altruistic Acts

altruism-monkey

Steve Chang and his colleagues from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, have discovered that monkeys have a specific area in their brains to keep track of altruistic acts. This might help researchers understand the mechanisms underlying normal social behavior in primates and humans, and could even provide insight about autism spectrum disorder. The scientists […]

Continue reading...

December 24, 2012

0 Comments

Pannoniasaurus inexpectatus, The First Freshwater Mosasaur Discovered

Discovered in August 2010, the mosasaur Platecarpus was a marine lizard, like most other mosasaurs so far discovered. Credit: Illustration by Stephanie Abramowciz, NHM Dinosaur Institute

A new species of mosasaur was discovered in Hungry, providing the first evidence that mosasaurs lived in both freshwater and marine environments. The scientists published their findings in the journal PLoS ONE¹. The first mosasaur was discovered in 1764, and since then, thousands of specimens have been discovered. Until now, paleontologists had no evidence that […]

Continue reading...

December 24, 2012

2 Comments

Hubble Views Spiral Galaxy IC 2233

spiral galaxy IC 2233

This new image from Hubble shows spiral galaxy IC 2233, which is one of the flattest galaxies known and is located about 40 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Lynx. Like finding a silver needle in the haystack of space, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has produced this beautiful image of the […]

Continue reading...

December 23, 2012

1 Comment

MALBAC Offers More Efficient Way to Sequence DNA

single-cell-genomics-efficient

Sequencing DNA is nothing new, but it’s much harder to sequence the DNA of a single cell. In order to get enough DNA for sequencing, usually thousands or millions of cells are required. Finding out which mutations are in which cells is extremely difficult, making the mutations present in only a few cells, like early […]

Continue reading...

December 22, 2012

0 Comments

Curing Boredom

bored-baby

Many normal situations have the potential to be unbelievably boring. Boredom is more than just one of life’s minor irritations; it has been linked to drug use, alcoholism, problematic gambling and compulsive behavior. It has even been tied to potentially lethal errors in job execution since bored personnel preform less reliably than people engaged in […]

Continue reading...

December 22, 2012

2 Comments

Appendicitis Could Be Diagnosed By Speed Bumps

speed-bump-appendicitis

Driving over speed bumps could help doctors diagnose whether patients are suffering from acute appendicitis. The scientists published their findings in the journal BMJ. The link between pain induced by speed bumps and appendicitis was already suspected, but this study is the first to produce evidence for this idea. Asking patients whether the pain worsened […]

Continue reading...

December 22, 2012

0 Comments

Smaller Ski Resorts Threatened By Warmer Winters

winter-skiing

Northern exposure, aggressive snowmaking and hard manmade snow crystals are helping some of the bigger ski resorts deal with climate change, but smaller operations are under threat as the warmer winters will lead to less snow on the ground. The scientists published their findings in the journal Tourism Management. Regional operations at lower elevations that […]

Continue reading...

December 21, 2012

0 Comments

The Reasons Why Rock & Pop Stars Die Young

ap-whitney-houston-dead

According to a new report, rock and pop stars die young. Many of them die from drug overdoses, AIDS or drunk-driving accidents. The study found that the average lifespan of American musical stars in pop, rock and rap genre is only 45. The average European stars die on average at age 39. The scientists published […]

Continue reading...

December 21, 2012

0 Comments

Haast’s Eagle Was Big & Strong Enough to Prey on Humans

haasts-eagle-two-moa

The strongest and biggest bird of prey that ever existed was the Haast’s Eagle (Harpagornis moorei) of New Zealand, and it became extinct around the 1400s soon after the Maori settled the South Island of New Zealand. H. moorei was powerful enough to attack and prey on giant flightless birds, the moa, weighing 10 to […]

Continue reading...

December 21, 2012

0 Comments

Origin of Ion-Pumping Proteins Could Explain How Life Began

underwater-thermal-vent

A new study indicates how the first cells might have evolved from rocks, water and hot alkaline fluid rich in hydrogen gas spewing out of deep-sea vents, and how they might have escaped their deep sea lairs. The scientists published their findings in the journal Cell¹. Scientists thought that the origin of life was tied […]

Continue reading...