September 19, 2012

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DARPA’s CT2WS Program Improves Target Detection

CT120 Camera

Launched in 2008 to improve the ability to detect threats from standoff distances, DARPA’s CT2WS program uses human brainwaves, improved sensors, and cognitive algorithms to improve visual threat detection, identifying up to 91 percent of targets during testing with extremely low false-alarm rates and widening a warfighter’s field of view to 120 degrees. For warfighters […]

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September 19, 2012

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Improved Estimates of DNA’s Mutation Rate Paint Clearer Picture of Human Prehistory

reconstruction-homo-heidelbergensis

Since the 1960s, DNA has changed the story of human ancestry. Some studies have shown that all modern humans are descended from ancestors who lived in Africa 100,000 years ago. Some new findings suggest that key events in human evolution contradict archeology. Estimates of DNA’s mutation rate work like a molecular clock that underpins genetic […]

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September 19, 2012

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Overcoming Barriers to Stem Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine

colony of induced pluripotent stem cells

In a newly published paper, a team of researchers from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and their collaborators at UC San Diego found that there is a consistent signature difference between embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells; findings that could help implement the use of induced stem cells in regenerative medicine. La Jolla, California […]

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September 19, 2012

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Arctic Sea Ice Melt Might Spur Extreme Weather Conditions in Europe

extreme-winter

This year, the Arctic sea experienced a record ice melt during the summer and this might mean that northern Europe will experience a frigid winter. In the past years, when there was a lot of ice melt, there were bad winters. Jennifer Francis, a researcher at Rutgers University, states that they can’t make any certain […]

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September 19, 2012

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Understanding the Evolution of Organic Molecules in our Solar System

Researchers mimic materials at the edge of our solar system

A newly published study from scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory provides the first direct look at the organic chemistry that takes place on icy particles in the frigid reaches of our solar system. Would you like icy organics with that? Maybe not in your coffee, but researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, […]

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September 19, 2012

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Room-Temperature Superconductivity Might Have Been Attained

boron-doped-carbon

Material scientists in Germany have claimed that they have discovered a material that can act at a superconductor at room temperature. If this is accurate, then there could be huge potential energy savings since superconductors transmit electricity with zero resistance. Until now, the superconductors work at temperatures of about -110°C and lower. The scientists have […]

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September 18, 2012

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Dark Energy Camera Captures its First Images

first images captured by the Dark Energy Camera

Located on a mountaintop in Chile, the newly-constructed Dark Energy Camera is the most powerful sky-mapping machine ever created and has captured and recorded its first rays of light from distant galaxies. When the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) opened its giant eye last week and began taking pictures of the ancient light from far-off galaxies, […]

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September 18, 2012

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Sleeping Longer On Weekends Doesn’t Erase Sleep Debt

sleep-cycle

Unlike the popular belief that sleeping more on the weekends can help sleep deprived people catch up on sleep, a new sleep study has shown that sleeping in on the weekends will make you sleepier come Monday morning. The scientists announced their findings through UT Southwestern.  A great myth of sleep deprivation is that if […]

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September 18, 2012

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Prevalence of Multi-Drug Resistant E. Coli Rising ICAAC 2 Reports

Ecoli-close-up

Infections with multi-drug resistant E. coli, which is also known as ESBL (extended spectrum beta-lactamase), have been assumed to be a hospital phenomenon. A recent analysis presented at The Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) surveyed records from five hospital across the USA (New York, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Texas, and Iowa) and identified 291 […]

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September 18, 2012

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Probable Distance to Remnant of Kepler’s Supernova

An image of the Kepler supernova remnant

Scientists at CfA have taken an important step in determining the distance of the remnant of Kepler’s supernova, concluding that the remnant distance is probably greater than about twenty-one thousand light-years. Supernovae, the explosive deaths of massive stars, are among the most momentous events in the cosmos because they disburse into space all of the […]

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September 18, 2012

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Atomic Bond Types Clearly Discernible Thanks to Single-Molecule Images

atomic-bonds

A team from IBM in Zürich has released images they captured of single-molecules that are so detailed that the type of atomic bonds between their atoms can be discerned. The scientists published their findings in the journal Science. The same IBM team took the first ever single-molecule images in 2009 and most recently published the […]

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September 18, 2012

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NASA’s Opportunity Discovers Geological Mystery on Mars

Puzzling Little Martian Spheres nicknamed 'Blueberries'

NASA’s Opportunity rover discovered puzzling spherical objects on Mars at a rock outcrop called Kirkwood. The spherules vary in composition, concentration, distribution and structure from the spherules that were discovered eight-and-a-half years earlier and nicknamed “blueberries.” Pasadena, California — NASA’s long-lived rover Opportunity has returned an image of the Martian surface that is puzzling researchers. […]

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