August 28, 2012

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Early Intake of Antibiotics Linked to Obesity in Mice

obese-baby-mouse-mouselet

Bacteria living within the gut could have a link to obesity, possibly explaining how antibiotics fatten farm animals, and humans as well, and predispose some organisms to obesity. Researchers published their findings in the journal Nature. In the study, the scientists replicated what farmers have been doing for decades to fatten up their livestock: feeding […]

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August 28, 2012

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Rapid Star Formation Observed in the Phoenix Cluster

Phoenix Cluster

Using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Magellan telescopes in Chile, the South Pole Telescope in Antarctica, and other facilities, a team of astronomers discovered the Phoenix Cluster, which is located 5.7 billion light-years away and is undergoing a massive burst of star formation with about 740 solar-masses worth of new stars being created every year. […]

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August 27, 2012

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Brucella Blocked From Bonding with Host, Could Lead to Superbug Cure

brucella-bacterium

Pathogenic bacteria without their virulent factors could be rendered harmless and eliminated by the human immune system. That’s the goal that a group of researchers have been striving for, and they recently managed to block the Brucella bacteria from bonding with its host. The scientists published their findings in the journal Chemistry & Biology. Infectious […]

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August 27, 2012

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SOLITAIRE Dramatically Outperforms Standard Brain Clot Removal Tool

Solitaire Device

A newly published study details the findings from a clinical study involving 113 stroke patients at 18 hospitals in which the FDA approved SOLITAIRE Flow Restoration Device dramatically outperformed the standard mechanical treatment for removing stroke causing clots. Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and a common cause of long-term disability in the […]

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August 27, 2012

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NASA PhoneSat Plans on Launching Satellites Made from COTS Components

nasa-phonesat

NASA is currently basking in the success of their Curiosity mission to Mars, but if the space agency hopes to continue to lead the charge in space exploration, it needs to find new ways of doing old things. NASA’s PhoneSat project aims to launch low-cost satellites, easily assembled, and place them into orbit. Engineers have […]

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August 27, 2012

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The Neuroscience of Threat Response

neuroscience-threat-response

It’s a biological imperative how organisms respond to threats, and humans are no exception. Humans respond to threats, perceived or real, in an instinctual way, but the exact neuroscience behind these reactions is still somewhat of a mystery. DARPA, the Pentagon’s advanced research division, has just awarded a $300,000 grant to Alaa Ahmed, an integrative […]

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August 27, 2012

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3-D Scaffold That Could Monitor Electrical Activity of Engineered Tissue

3-D reconstructed confocal fluorescence micrograph of a tissue scaffold

Designed by a team of scientists from Harvard, MIT and Boston Children’s Hospital, electronic sensors made of silicon nanowires could be used to monitor electrical activity in engineered tissue and control drug release or screen drug candidates for their effects on the beating of heart tissue. To control the three-dimensional shape of engineered tissue, researchers […]

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August 27, 2012

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Disease Mapping Methods Indicate That Indo-European Languages Originated From Anatolia

disease-map-spread-indo-european-languages

Diverse languages, from English to Hindi, can trace their roots back 8,000 years to Anatolia (Asia Minor), a region that’s centered around modern-day Turkey. The study assessed 103 ancient and contemporary languages using a technique that’s normally used to study the spread and evolution of diseases. Languages such as English, Dutch, Spanish, Russian, Greek and […]

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August 27, 2012

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Hubble Views Messier 56

globular cluster Messier 56

Consisting of visible and near-infrared exposures from Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys, the above image shows globular cluster Messier 56, which is located in the Lyra constellation roughly 33,000 light years away from the Earth. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has produced this beautiful image of the globular cluster Messier 56 (also known as M […]

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August 24, 2012

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Curiosity’s ChemCam Laser Yields Good Results

ChemCam laser yields good results

The results are coming in and they look good. Scientists confirmed that the ChemCam laser on NASA’s Curiosity rover has produced strong, clear data about the composition of the Martian surface. Los Alamos, New Mexico — Members of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover ChemCam team, including Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, squeezed in a […]

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August 24, 2012

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Ultrathin Flat Lens Focuses Light without Optical Distortions

ultrathin, flat lens focuses light without imparting the optical distortions of conventional lenses

By plating a very thin wafer of silicon with a nanometer-thin layer of gold, applied physicists have created an ultrathin, flat lens that focuses light without imparting the distortions of conventional lenses. Cambridge, Massachusetts – Applied physicists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have created an ultrathin, flat lens that focuses […]

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August 24, 2012

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The First-Ever Direct Observations of a Type 1a Supernova Progenitor System

supernova PTF 11kx

Using data from the Palomar Transient Factory Real-Time Detection Pipeline, astronomers were able to verify and document the first-ever direct observations of a Type 1a supernova progenitor system, PTF 11kx. Berkeley, California — Exploding stars called Type 1a supernova are ideal for measuring cosmic distance because they are bright enough to spot across the Universe […]

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August 24, 2012

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Neurologists Repair Neurons Associated with Traumatic Nerve Injury Pain

Gene therapy shows promise in neuron repair

In an effort to find new treatments for people suffering from neuropathic pain, Yale University neurologists have managed to repair neurons associated with traumatic nerve injury pain in rats. Neuropathic pain associated with diabetes, shingles, and traumatic injury affects up to 18 percent of the population and can be difficult or impossible to effectively treat. […]

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August 24, 2012

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Nanocrystalline Alloys that Meet Operational Requirements

structure of the new tungsten-titanium alloy

In a newly published research paper, MIT scientists describe the method they used to identify and fabricate nanocrystalline alloys that meet operational requirements, even at elevated temperatures. Most metals — from the steel used to build bridges and skyscrapers to the copper and gold used to form wires in microchips — are made of crystals: […]

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August 24, 2012

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Kepler Data Used to Identify 41 New Transiting Planets

41 new transiting planets in Kepler field of view

Using data from NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope, scientists have verified 41 new transiting planets in 20 star systems, ranging from Earth-size to more than seven times the radius of Earth. Two newly submitted studies verify 41 new transiting planets in 20 star systems. These results may increase the number of Kepler’s confirmed planets by more […]

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August 23, 2012

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South Korean Rivers Hit By Algal Blooms, Dam Project Blamed

Cyanobacteria

Algal blooms are currently choking up several rivers in South Korea. Environmentalists blame The Four Major Rivers Restoration Project, which was completed last October at a cost of 22 trillion won (US$19+ billion), for this. The algal bloom covers the Han, Geum, Nakdong and Yeongsan rivers. The project built 16 dams and dredged up 520 […]

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August 23, 2012

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Arctic Sea Ice Set for a Record Breaking Melt

arctic-sea-ice-minimum-nasa-2011

Following a season of unstable conditions this summer, the Arctic ice cap will have a record-breaking melt. This has been reported by the National Snow and Ice Data Center. The numbers have been coming in and scientists have been looking at them with a sense of amazement. If the melt were to stop today, it […]

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