July 24, 2012

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New Class of Proteins Inhibit HIV Infection in Cell Cultures

a new class of proteins that inhibit HIV

A newly published study details how Yale scientists constructed an entirely new class of proteins that inhibit HIV infection in cell cultures. Yale Cancer Center scientists have developed a new class of proteins that inhibit HIV infection in cell cultures and may open the way to new strategies for treating and preventing infection by the […]

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July 23, 2012

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Image of the Aurora Australis over Concordia Station

green glow of Aurora Australis high over Concordia station

A recent image taken by Alexander Kumar and his colleague Erick Bondoux shows the Aurora Australis, also known as the southern lights, over Concordia Station. The ethereal green glow of Aurora Australis high over Concordia station on July 18, 2012. It was taken by ESA-sponsored scientist Alexander Kumar and his colleague Erick Bondoux from about […]

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July 23, 2012

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Experimental Evidence Verifies High-Pressure Structure for Cold-Compressed Graphite

physicists confirm the structure of cold-compressed graphite

Using high-pressure experiments, Yale researchers confirmed in a published study the structure of cold-compressed graphite for the first time, possibly opening the door for uses electronic and industrial applications. A Yale-led team of mineral physicists has for the first time confirmed through high-pressure experiments the structure of cold-compressed graphite, a form of carbon that is […]

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July 23, 2012

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Nanotechnology Used to Create “Magnetic Domain-Wall Ratchet” Memory

computer memory that is built up from moving bits of magnetised areas

A newly published study details how scientists at the Eindhoven University of Technology developed “magnetic domain-wall ratchet” memory, computer memory that is built up from moving bits of magnetized areas. Researchers from TU/e and the FOM Foundation have successfully made a ‘magnetic domain-wall ratchet’ memory, a computer memory that is built up from moving bits […]

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July 23, 2012

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Medusoid, A Tissue-Engineered Jellyfish with the Ability to Swim

researchers reverse engineers a jellyfish with the ability to swim

After thoroughly studying jellyfish propulsion, including the arrangement of their muscles, how their bodies contract and recoil, and how fluid-dynamic effects help or hinder their movements, a team of scientists tissue-engineered a jellyfish with biomimetic propulsion from chemically dissociated rat tissue and silicone polymer. Pasadena, California — When one observes a colorful jellyfish pulsating through […]

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July 23, 2012

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Accretion Around TW Hydrae

TW Hydrae

While studying TW Hydrae, a relatively young star in the TW Hydrae stellar association, astronomers were able to track an accretion flare spectroscopically, providing direct information on how the excitation of the gas evolves during these events. The star TW Hydrae is located about 150 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation of […]

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July 23, 2012

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Genomic Analysis of Colon Cancer Reveals New Potential Drug Targets

Cancer Genome Reveals New Drug Targets

A new genome-scale analysis to characterize somatic alterations in colorectal carcinoma is the largest analysis of its kind, involving more than 150 researchers at dozens of institutions and more than 270 tumor samples. A comprehensive genomic analysis suggests that colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer and reveals previously unsuspected therapeutic targets […]

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July 23, 2012

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How Airports Will Influence the Spread of a Contagious Disease

how airports are to influence the spread of a contagious disease originating in their home cities

By focusing on the initial days of an epidemic and determining how likely the largest U.S. airports are to influence the spread of a contagious disease originating in their home cities, a new study from MIT scientists aims to help public health officials in determining appropriate measures for containing infection in specific geographic areas. Public […]

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July 23, 2012

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Hubble Captures a New Image of Messier 107

An Audience of Stellar Flashbulbs

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has captured a new image of globular star cluster Messier 107, which is located in the constellation of Ophiuchus. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured a crowd of stars that looks rather like a stadium darkened before a show, lit only by the flashbulbs of the audience’s cameras. Yet the […]

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July 20, 2012

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First Whole-Cell Computational Model of the Life Cycle of an Organism

first complete computer model of an organism

Using data from more than 900 scientific papers, a team of Stanford researchers produced the first whole-cell computational model of the life cycle of the human pathogen Mycoplasma genitalium, including all of its molecular components and their interactions. In a breakthrough effort for computational biology, the world’s first complete computer model of an organism has […]

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July 20, 2012

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NASA’s High Resolution Coronal Imager Captures Sharpest Images of Sun’s Corona

the highest-resolution images ever taken of the sun's corona in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength

With a resolution that is roughly five times more detailed than the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument flying aboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, NASA’s High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) provides images with clarity 10 times better than high definition television and provides more comprehensive science data faster than any solar observing spacecraft in history. A telescope […]

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July 20, 2012

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Marine Reserves Enhance Resilience to Climatic Impacts & Aid in Ecosystem Recovery

Marine Reserves Enhance Resilience to Climatic Impacts

A new study from scientists at Stanford University and the Monterey Bay Aquarium reveals scientific evidence suggesting that marine reserves enhance resilience to climatic impacts, helping ecosystems bounce back after environmental disasters. For years, scientists, fishers and government regulators could only speculate that marine reserves, pockets of ocean that are off limits to fishing, could […]

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July 20, 2012

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Highly Transparent Polymer Solar Cell Produces Energy by Absorbing Near-Infrared Light

transparent solar cells for windows

Using a photoactive plastic that converts infrared light into an electrical current, scientists developed a new kind of polymer solar cell that produces energy by absorbing mainly near-infrared light, not visible light, making the cells nearly 70% transparent to the human eye. UCLA researchers have developed a new transparent solar cell that is an advance […]

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July 20, 2012

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Intermediate-Mass Black Hole Candidates Discovered at the Center of the Milky Way

IMBH Candidates Discovered at the Center of the Milky Way

Using radio telescopes, a team of scientists at Keio University have discovered several intermediate-mass black hole candidates, which are considered to be the “seeds” that form and grow massive black holes, at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. A research team at Keio University, led by Associate Professor Tomoharu Oka, has discovered intermediate-mass black […]

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July 20, 2012

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Nanomaterials Actively Self-Regulate in Response to Environmental Change

SMARTS self-regulating nanomaterials

A newly published study from a team of engineers describes a strategy for building self-thermoregulating nanomaterials called SMARTS, which may be able to be tailored to maintain just about any desired parameter by meeting the environmental changes with a compensatory chemical feedback response. Living organisms have developed sophisticated ways to maintain stability in a changing […]

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July 20, 2012

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Engineers to Develop a Smart Suit That Improves Physical Endurance

Smart suit improves human physical endurance

Engineers at the Wyss Institute are working on a smart suit that helps improve physical endurance for soldiers in the field, delaying the onset of fatigue and potentially improving the body’s resistance to injuries when carrying heavy loads. The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University today announced that it has received a […]

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July 20, 2012

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Limited River Erosion on Titan has Scientists Looking for Possible Explanations

surface of Saturn’s largest moon may have undergone a recent transformation

Using images taken from Cassini-Huygens, a team of researchers analyzed and mapped 52 prominent liquid methane river networks from four regions on Saturn’s moon Titan, finding surprisingly little erosion and raising questions about what has been happening on Titan in the last billion years. For many years, Titan’s thick, methane- and nitrogen-rich atmosphere kept astronomers […]

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