Disease News

Yale Researchers Reveal How Antibodies Access Neurons to Fight Infection

May 23, 2016

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Yale Researchers Show How Antibodies Access Neurons to Fight Infection

New research from Yale University reveals how antibodies enter the nervous system to control viral infections. The findings may have implications for the prevention and treatment of a range of conditions, including herpes and Guillain-Barre syndrome, which has been linked to the Zika virus. Many viruses — such as West Nile, Zika, and the herpes […]

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New Evidence That Diet and Gut Microbes Can Influence Brain Inflammation

May 16, 2016

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Researchers Find Evidence That Diet and Gut Microbes Can Influence Brain Inflammation

A newly discovered link between deficits in gut flora and brain inflammation may lead researchers to learn more about its impact on multiple sclerosis. A team of investigators at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) has found evidence that suggests that bacteria living in the gut may remotely influence the activity of cells in the […]

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New Approach Identifies Genetic Markers Linked to Complex Diseases

May 10, 2016

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Study Identifies New Gene Variants for Treating Arrhythmia

Researchers from MIT have developed a new approach that identifies genetic markers linked to complex diseases. Many diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and schizophrenia, tend to be passed down through families. After researchers sequenced the human genome about 15 years ago, they had high hopes that this trove of information would reveal the genes that […]

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Yale Researchers Identify a Genetic Mutation Linked to Acne

May 5, 2016

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Yale Study Zeroes in on Mutation Linked to Zits

New research from Yale University has identified a genetic mutation responsible for the defects that give rise to mild and severe acne, possibly revealing new targets for acne treatment. In the study, the Yale-led team took blood and tissue samples from three individuals with a rare form of acne known as nevus comedonicus. By sequencing […]

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New Study Shows Fructose Alters Brain Genes, Which Can Lead to Disease

April 25, 2016

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New Research Shows Fructose Alters Brain Genes, Can Lead to Disease

A new study by researchers at UCLA reveals that genes in the brain can be damaged by fructose, leading to diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. A range of diseases — from diabetes to cardiovascular disease, and from Alzheimer’s disease to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder — are linked to […]

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New Findings Provide a Design for an HIV Vaccine Germline-Targeting Immunogen

March 28, 2016

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Scientists Announce New Anti-HIV Agent

A team of researchers has found HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells that are present in most people, and has described the design of an HIV vaccine germline-targeting immunogen capable of binding those B cells. Some people infected with HIV naturally produce antibodies that effectively neutralize many strains of the rapidly mutating virus, and […]

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New Stem Cell Innovation Could Someday Help Treat Parkinson’s

March 17, 2016

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Stem Cell Innovation Could Treat Parkinson’s

A team of researchers from Rutgers and Stanford have created a new way to inject healthy human nerve cells into the brain that could someday help treat Parkinson’s disease and other devastating brain-related conditions that affect millions of people. The technology – a major innovation – involves converting adult tissue-derived stem cells into human neurons […]

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Yale Study Finds Racial Differences in Smoking Patterns

March 15, 2016

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Study Finds Differences in Smoking Habits between African Americans and Whites

A newly published study from Yale University reveals that differences in smoking habits between African Americans and whites may lead to a disparity in screening for lung cancer. The paper was published online March 15 in Nicotine & Tobacco Research. Cigarette smoking, the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, has been widely […]

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Scientists Reveal Amino Acids Supply Most Building Blocks for Tumor Cells

March 8, 2016

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Amino Acids Supply Most Building Blocks for Tumor Cells

New research shows that amino acids, not glucose, account for the majority of cell mass in proliferating mammalian cells. Cancer cells are notorious for their ability to divide uncontrollably and generate hordes of new tumor cells. Most of the fuel consumed by these rapidly proliferating cells is glucose, a type of sugar. Scientists had believed […]

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Neuroscientists Discover a Behavioral State Gene That May be Linked to Autism

March 7, 2016

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Gene for Behavioral State May be Linked to Autism

In a newly published study, neuroscientists from MIT reeval a gene that plays a critical role in controlling the switch between alternative behavioral states – which for humans include hunger and fullness, or sleep and wakefulness. This gene, which the researchers dubbed vps-50, helps to regulate neuropeptides — tiny proteins that carry messages between neurons […]

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MIT Research Shows How Diet Influences Colon Cancer

March 2, 2016

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MIT Study Shows How Diet Influences Colon Cancer

New research from MIT reveals ties high-fat diet to changes in intestinal stem cells, helping to explain an increased cancer risk. Over the past decade, studies have found that obesity and eating a high-fat, high-calorie diet are significant risk factors for many types of cancer. Now, a new study from MIT reveals how a high-fat […]

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Yale Scientists Reveal Underlying Cause of Myeloma

February 11, 2016

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Yale Scientists Discover Underlying Cause of Myeloma

Scientists from the Yale Cancer Center have identified what causes a third of all myelomas, a type of cancer affecting plasma cells. The findings, published February 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine, could fundamentally change the way this cancer and others are treated. Multiple myeloma is a cancer involving the growth of plasma […]

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New Yale Study Pinpoints Key Protein in Severe Vascular Disease

February 9, 2016

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Key Protein in Severe Vascular Disease Revealed

New research from Yale University investigates factors that squeeze, or narrow, the aorta in a common vascular disease, revealing a target for potential new treatments. Individuals who suffer from supravalvular aortic stenosis, a condition characterized by narrowing of the aorta, have only one copy instead of the usual two copies of the gene encoding elastin. […]

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Biochemists Identify Another Piece of the Parkinson’s Disease Pathology Puzzle

January 28, 2016

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Researchers Identify another Piece in the Parkinson's Disease Pathology Puzzle

An international team has discovered that the LRRK2 kinase regulates cellular trafficking by deactivating Rab proteins. This finding illuminates a novel route for therapeutic development and may accelerate testing of LRRK2 inhibitors as a disease-modifying therapy for Parkinson’s, the second most common neurodegenerative disease. An international public-private research consortium has identified and validated a cellular […]

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Yale Researchers Identify Molecular Link between Obesity and Fatty Liver Disease

January 26, 2016

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New Link between Obesity and a Common Liver Disease Discovered

The high levels of obesity in the United States contribute to fatty liver disease, the most common form of liver disease. A newly published study from Yale University identifies molecular links between the two, and points to a possible therapy. Fatty liver disease — also known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH — frequently progresses to […]

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Yale Examines How Bacteria Might Trigger and Treat Autoimmune Disease

January 11, 2016

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How Beneficial Bacteria Inside Our Bodies Might Trigger and Treat Autoimmune Disease

New research from Yale University is exploring how beneficial bacteria that live in the gut might trick the body into an autoimmune reaction known as antiphospholipid syndrome. Doctors often describe the body’s immune system in military terms. Physical barriers such as skin and mucus prevent invasion by disease-causing pathogens such as bacteria and viruses. If […]

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New Research Reveals How Cancer Cells Escape Blood Vessels

December 16, 2015

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Scientists Reveal How Cancer Cells Escape Blood Vessels

A newly published study from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital reveals how cancer cells latch onto blood vessels and invade tissues to form new tumors — a finding that could help researchers develop drugs that inhibit this process and prevent cancers from metastasizing. Cancer cells circulating in the bloodstream can stick to blood vessel walls […]

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Scientists Develop “Kill Switches” for Engineered Bacteria

December 14, 2015

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Engineered Bacteria with Kill Switches

To prevent genetically modified bacteria from escaping into the wider environment, MIT researchers have developed safeguards in the form of two so-called “kill switches,” which they call “Deadman” and “Passcode.” These kill switches can cause synthetic bacteria to die without the presence of certain chemicals. Many research teams are developing genetically modified bacteria that could […]

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