Disease News

Study Shows Aspirin Use Lowers the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

January 9, 2017

0 Comments

Aspirin Lowers Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

New research led by the Yale School of Public Health shows that regular use of aspirin lowers the risk for pancreatic cancer by almost 50 percent. Researchers studied patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer at 37 Shanghai hospitals from December 2006 to January 2011. The 761 patients were interviewed in person about their use of […]

Continue reading...

FDA-Approved Drug Treats a Rare Cardiac Disease

December 15, 2016

0 Comments

Cancer Drug Treats Rare Cardiac Disease

New research shows that a low-dose of the FDA-approved drug dasatinib improves heart function in Noonan syndrome. About 1 in 2,500 babies born in the United States each year have Noonan syndrome (NS), a genetic disorder that results in severe heart defects, among other symptoms. A mutation in a gene called PTPN11 which encodes for […]

Continue reading...

Common Mechanism May Be Responsible for the Spread of Alzheimer’s and CTE

December 8, 2016

0 Comments

Alzheimer’s and CTE May Spread Via a Common Mechanism

A newly published study from UC San Francisco reveals that a shared biological mechanism may drive the progression of both Alzheimer’s disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Both Alzheimer’s and CTE are classified as “tauopathies,” a category of diseases characterized by the improper folding and clumping together of a protein called tau (rhymes with “how”) inside […]

Continue reading...

‘NoBody’ – A Microprotein on a Mission

December 5, 2016

1 Comment

NoBody, A Microprotein on a Mission

Using a technique that has revealed more than 400 new proteins too tiny to be found by other means, scientists from Yale University have helped identify a novel, functional “microprotein” encoded in the human genome. One of those microproteins, called NoBody, is a molecular workhorse involved in sweeping out unneeded genetic material inside cells. Its […]

Continue reading...

New Study Links Zika and Glaucoma

November 30, 2016

0 Comments

Zika and Glaucoma Linked for First Time

A newly published study demonstrates for the first time that the Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants who were exposed to the virus during gestation. Exposure to the Zika virus during pregnancy causes birth defects of the central nervous system, including microcephaly. Brazilian and Yale School of Public Health researchers had reported early during […]

Continue reading...

New Yale Study Points to a Possible Treatment for a Rare Vascular Disease

November 29, 2016

0 Comments

Study Reveals a Possible Treatment for a Rare Vascular Disease

New research from Yale University points to a possible treatment for a rare genetic disorder that affects blood vessels. In individuals with a rare genetic disorder that affects blood vessels, arteries and veins develop abnormal connections, causing bleeding in the skin, nose, and other organs. In most cases, the condition — hereditary hemorraghic telangiectasia, or […]

Continue reading...

Do Community Factors Affect Your Weight?

November 18, 2016

0 Comments

Does Where You Live Affect What You Weigh

A newly published study from Yale University shows that community-level factors may be associated with reduced adult obesity rates in counties within states that have a high adult obesity rate. Adult obesity rates in the United States have reached epidemic proportions, with one in four people considered obese. Yet, obesity rates vary considerably across states […]

Continue reading...

Researchers Find Antibody That ‘Neutralizes’ Zika Virus

November 8, 2016

0 Comments

Study Finds Antibody That ‘Neutralizes’ Zika Virus

A team of researchers has isolated a human monoclonal antibody that in a mouse model “markedly reduced” infection by the Zika virus. The antibody, called ZIKV-117, also protected the fetus in pregnant mice infected with the virus, the researchers reported today in the journal Nature. Zika is believed to cause microcephaly, unusually small heads, and […]

Continue reading...

Scientists Identify Potential Treatment for Fatal Leptospirosis

November 7, 2016

0 Comments

Researchers Identify Potential Treatment for Fatal Leptospirosis

New research on leptospirosis sheds light on how the disease causes death and reveals a potentially novel treatment. While rare in the United States, leptospirosis remains an important health threat for impoverished populations in developing countries, causing more than one million illnesses and 60,000 deaths annually. The reasons why leptospirosis causes life-threatening manifestations, such as […]

Continue reading...

MIT Engineers Design a New Weapon Against Bacteria

November 2, 2016

0 Comments

Engineers Design a New Weapon Against Bacteria

An international team of engineers has developed an antimicrobial peptide that can destroy many types of bacteria, including some that are resistant to most antibiotics. Over the past few decades, many bacteria have become resistant to existing antibiotics, and few new drugs have emerged. A recent study from a U.K. commission on antimicrobial resistance estimated […]

Continue reading...

How Nanoscience Will Improve Our Lives in the Coming Years

October 31, 2016

0 Comments

Nanoscience Will Improve Our Health and Lives in the Coming Years

In a newly published study, nanoscientists look ahead to what we can expect in the coming decade, and conclude that nanoscience is poised to make important contributions in many areas, including health care, electronics, energy, food and water. Nanoscience research involves molecules that are only 1/100th the size of cancer cells and that have the potential to […]

Continue reading...

A Promising New Form of Immunotherapy for Cancer

October 27, 2016

0 Comments

New Approach to Cancer Treatment

New research suggests a way to increase the staying power of CAR T cells, a promising form of immunotherapy for cancer. In people with chronic infections or cancer, disease-fighting T cells tend to behave like an overworked militia — wheezing, ill-prepared, tentative, in a state of “exhaustion” that allows disease to persist. In a paper […]

Continue reading...

Yale Develops New Gene Editing Strategy to Correct Mutations

October 26, 2016

0 Comments

New Gene Editing Strategy to Correct Mutations

Using a new gene editing strategy, researchers from Yale University can correct mutations that cause thalassemia, a form of anemia. Their gene editing technique provided corrections to the mutations and alleviated the disease in mice, the researchers said. The finding could lead to studies of a similar gene therapy to treat people with inherited blood […]

Continue reading...

Two-Pronged Immune Response Destroys Tumors

October 24, 2016

0 Comments

New Treatment Elicits Two-Pronged Immune Response That Destroys Tumors in Mice

Using a combination of four different therapies, researchers from MIT reveal a new treatment that destroys tumors in mice. Harnessing the body’s own immune system to destroy tumors is a tantalizing prospect that has yet to realize its full potential. However, a new advance from MIT may bring this strategy, known as cancer immunotherapy, closer […]

Continue reading...

STEP Protein Linked to Alzheimer’s May Also Play a Role in Schizophrenia

October 18, 2016

1 Comment

Protein linked to Alzheimer’s May Also Play a Role in Schizophrenia

New research from Yale University shows that an increase in the STEP (STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase) protein leads to a disruption of synaptic function and contributes to cognitive disorders. A specific protein implicated in the cognitive decline of Alzheimer’s disease also appears to play a role in genetic predisposition to schizophrenia, meaning that a drug […]

Continue reading...

New Research Provides Hope for Better Wound Healing for Diabetics

October 17, 2016

0 Comments

New Hope for Better Wound Healing for People with Diabetes

New research from the Max Planck Institute could lead to the development of new wound treatment methods for people with diabetes. Diabetics often have to contend with wounds that heal poorly. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, the CECAD Excellence Cluster and the Institute of Genetics of the University of Cologne […]

Continue reading...

Yale Researchers Reveal Genes Behind Aggressive Ovarian and Endometrial Cancers

October 11, 2016

0 Comments

Researchers Find Genes Behind Aggressive Ovarian and Endometrial Cancers

Researchers from Yale University have defined the genetic landscape of rare, highly aggressive tumors called carcinosarcomas, pointing the way to possible new treatments. The findings are published in the early edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Endometrial and ovarian cancers are the most prevalent gynecologic tumors in women, with over 76,160 newly […]

Continue reading...

Researchers Identify a New Way to Suppress Lung Tumors

October 3, 2016

1 Comment

A New Way to Suppress Lung Tumors

A team of researchers has identified a new blocking mechanism that acts more like a dimmer switch and potently inhibits lung tumor cell growth. Lung cancer cell growth depends on certain proteins that require the addition of sugar molecule chains to become active. Scientists have long thought that the addition of these sugar chains is […]

Continue reading...