Epidemiology News

Human Body Weight Influenced by Microbes in the Gut

November 7, 2014

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Research Shows Weight Influenced by Microbes in the Gut

New research from King’s College London and Cornell University reveals that genetic makeup influences whether people are fat or thin by shaping which types of microbes thrive in our body, paving the way for personalized probiotic therapies that are optimized to reduce the risk of obesity-related diseases based on an individual’s genetic make-up. By studying […]

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Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Share Eight Molecular Pathways

November 4, 2014

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Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease May Be Related

In a newly published study, researchers uncover several potential ways that type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease may be related at the level of genes, proteins, and fundamental physiology in women. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) appear to have a lot in common. They share risk […]

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Targeted Isolation May Be the Most Effective Way to Reduce Transmission of Ebola

October 28, 2014

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Isolation May Be the Most Effective Way to Reduce Transmission of Ebola

New research led by the Yale School of Public Health shows that isolating 75% of infected individuals in critical condition within four days of symptom onset has a high chance of eliminating the spread of Ebola. Isolating the most severely ill Ebola patients before the fifth day of their illness may be the most effective […]

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Meta-Analysis Identifies Four New Genetic Risk Factors for Testicular Cancer

May 13, 2013

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Researchers Identify Four New Genetic Risk Factors for Testicular Cancer

Researchers have identified four new genetic variants associated with an increased risk of testicular cancer, supporting the notion that testicular cancer is a disorder of germ cell development and maturation. Philadelphia — A new study looking at the genomes of more than 13,000 men identified four new genetic variants associated with an increased risk of […]

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Biodiversity and Disease Risk for Humans

April 1, 2013

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Biodiversity and Disease Risk for Humans

A newly published study pokes holes in widely accepted theory that connects biodiversity abundance with a reduced disease risk for humans, finding that the links between biodiversity and disease prevalence are variable and dependent on the disease system, local ecology and probably human social context. More than three quarters of new, emerging or re-emerging human […]

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Vitamin D Could Reduce the Risk of Type 1 Diabetes

February 6, 2013

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Vitamin D Could Halve the Risk of Type1 Diabetes

A new study from scientists at the Harvard School of Public Health suggests that vitamin D could protect against type 1 diabetes. Adequate levels of vitamin D during young adulthood may reduce the risk of adult-onset type 1 diabetes by as much as 50 percent, according to researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health […]

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Tick-Borne Infection Borrelia Miyamotoi Discovered in the United States

January 21, 2013

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Researchers Discover New Tick Borne Infection

Similar to Lyme disease, a new tick-borne infection known as Borrelia miyamotoi has been discovered in people in the United States. A new tick-borne infection that shares many similarities with Lyme disease has been discovered in 18 patients in southern New England and neighboring New York by researchers at the Yale Schools of Public Health […]

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Current State of Polio Eradication

January 11, 2013

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Administration of the RIBI oral polio vaccine. Credit: Flickr/RIBI

In Pakistan, nine health workers were killed last year. They were administering the polio vaccine, which has been cast by the Taliban as a plot against Islam. This is because the CIA used vaccination programs to get close to Osama bin Laden. Pakistan is one of three countries where the transmission of the virus has […]

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Drug Resistant Gonorrhea on the Rise in North America

January 10, 2013

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Common-STD-Resistance-On-The-Rise-in-North-America

The most common STIs in the USA, chlamydia and gonorrhea, are usually easy to eradicate thanks to doses of oral antibiotics, but now gonorrhea is getting more resistant to first line defense drugs. The scientists published their findings in The Journal of the American Medical Association¹. There are more than 321,000 cases of gonorrhea reported […]

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Antiseptics Used By Health Care Workers Might Cause Infections

January 3, 2013

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Credit: Flickr/Raindog

The FDA is warning that there is a possibility of health care-related infections caused by the antiseptics, which are supposed to prevent infections, used to disinfect skin before health care procedures. In the New England Journal of Medicine¹, Drs. Christina Y. Chang and Lesley-Anne Furlong of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research explain […]

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Compound in Panda Blood Could Fight Superbugs

January 2, 2013

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panda-blood-superbug

Researchers have discovered a potent antibody in panda blood, which could help fight increasingly prevalent drug-resistant strains of infections. Cathelicin-AM was discovered when researchers analyzed the DNA of pandas. It can kill fungi and bacteria. Scientists think that the antibiotic is released to protect the animals from infections in the wild. In studies, it was […]

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Drug Resistant Tuberculosis On The Rise

January 2, 2013

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A chest X-ray from a patient with tuberculosis (TB) in Lira, Uganda. Uganda is one of 22 countries accounting for roughly 80% of new TB cases each year. Credit: 
J. Matthews/Panos

Back in 2005, doctors at a remote hospital in the village of Tugela Ferry, South Africa, were puzzled when patients with HIV, who were initially responding well to antiretroviral drugs, began rapidly dying from tuberculosis. When patients contract ordinary TB, they start to feel better after a few weeks or months on a selection of […]

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H5N1 Work Will Probably Continue

December 20, 2012

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After a high-level meeting this week, work on the avian influenza H5N1 virus will probably continue by people who are not NIH funded. This is in the wake of a global debate about the risks and benefits of such research and a voluntary moratorium on the experiments lasting nearly a year. Experts met on Monday […]

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Kitchen Utensils Can Transfer Viruses

December 13, 2012

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knife-cutting-produce

According to a new study, cutting unclean fruits and vegetables can spread viruses to the knife. Scienitists already knew that bacteria could contaminate utensils this way, but this is the first study to see if the hepatitis A virus and norovirus can be transmitted this way. The scientists published their findings in the journal Food […]

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