Materials Science News

Metal Substrates Shape Two-Dimensional Boron Monolayers

September 2, 2015

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Theorists Show Flat Boron Form Would Depend on Metal Substrates

New calculations from theoretical physicists at Rice University show it may be possible to guide the formation of 2-D boron by tailoring boron-metal interactions. Rice University scientists have theoretically determined that the properties of atom-thick sheets of boron depend on where those atoms land. Calculation of the atom-by-atom energies involved in creating a sheet of […]

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Engineers Develop Optical Devices That Shape Light in Exotic Ways

September 1, 2015

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Ultrathin Optical Devices Shape Light in Exotic Ways

Engineers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology have developed innovative flat, optical lenses that are capable of manipulating light in ways that are difficult or impossible to achieve with conventional optical devices. The new lenses are not made of glass. Instead, silicon nanopillars are precisely arranged into a honeycomb pattern […]

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UJI Patents New Graphene-Based Catalysts

August 26, 2015

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New Graphene-Based Catalysts

By combining graphene and organometallic compounds, researchers have developed graphene-based materials that can catalyze reactions for the conversion and storage of energy. Researchers at the Universitat Jaume I have developed materials based on graphene that can catalyze reactions for the conversion and storage of energy. The technology patented by the UJI combines graphene and organometallic […]

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Yale Engineers Believe Cornstarch Could Lead To Better Protective Gear

August 24, 2015

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Cornstarch Could Lead To Better Protective Gear

New research from the Yale School of Engineering & Applied Science is examining how cornstarch could lead to better protective gear for police, military and athletes. A quick scan of Eric Brown’s laboratory finds all the requisite high-tech equipment and equation-filled whiteboards. More incongruous are the many containers of Argo cornstarch – the same kind […]

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Scientists Observed Conventional Superconductivity at Minus 70 Degrees Celsius

August 18, 2015

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Hydrogen Sulfide Becomes Superconductive at Minus 70 Degree Celsius

New research from the Max Planck Institute and the Johannes Gutenberg University reveals that hydrogen sulfide loses its electrical resistance under high pressure at minus 70 degrees Celsius. Up until now, no material has been able to conduct current with no resistance at such high temperatures: Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in […]

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Solid Electrolyte Paves the Way for Rechargeable Batteries with Almost Indefinite Lifetimes

August 17, 2015

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Rechargeable Batteries with Almost Indefinite Lifetimes

Engineers from MIT and Samsung have developed an approach for a solid electrolyte that could greatly improve both battery lifetime and safety, while providing a significant boost in the amount of power stored in a given space. If you pry open one of today’s ubiquitous high-tech devices — whether a cellphone, a laptop, or an […]

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Researchers Reveal Why Black Phosphorus May Surpass Graphene

August 15, 2015

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Phosphorene – The natural successor to Graphene?

In a newly published study, researchers from the Pohang University of Science and Technology detail how they were able to turn black phosphorus into a superior conductor that can be mass produced for electronic and optoelectronics devices. The research team operating out of Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), affiliated with the Institute for […]

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Scientists Predict Material with Record-Setting Melting Point, More Than 4,400 Kelvins

August 14, 2015

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Scientists from Brown Predict Material with Record-Setting Melting Point, More Than 4,400 Kelvins

Scientists at Brown University predict that a material made from hafnium, nitrogen, and carbon would have the highest known melting point, about two-thirds the temperature at the surface of the sun. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — Using powerful computer simulations, researchers from Brown University have identified a material with a higher melting point than […]

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Aluminum “Yolk-and-Shell” Nanoparticle Boosts Capacity and Power of Lithium-ion Batteries

August 14, 2015

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Yolks and Shells Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries

New research from MIT and Tsinghua University in China reveals that an aluminum “yolk-and-shell” nanoparticle could boost the capacity and power of lithium-ion batteries. One big problem faced by electrodes in rechargeable batteries, as they go through repeated cycles of charging and discharging, is that they must expand and shrink during each cycle — sometimes […]

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Scientists Reveal New Insights into the Coupling between Wetting and Catalytic Activity

August 6, 2015

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Reactivity of Perovskites with Water: Role of Hydroxylation in Wetting and Implications for Oxygen Electrocatalysis

In a newly published study, researchers reveal new insights into the coupling between wetting and catalytic activity and suggest that catalyst hydrophobicity should be considered in aqueous oxygen electrocatalysis. Two key physical phenomena take place at the surfaces of materials: catalysis and wetting. A catalyst enhances the rate of chemical reactions; wetting refers to how […]

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New Polymer Gel Could Create Edible Devices for Ultra-Long Drug Delivery

August 2, 2015

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New Technology Opens Possibilities for Super-Long-Acting Pills

A team of scientists has developed a polymer gel that could allow for the development of long-acting devices that reside in the stomach, including orally delivered capsules that can release drugs over a number of days, weeks, or potentially months following a single administration. Medical devices designed to reside in the stomach have a variety […]

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Gallium Nitride Electronics Poised to Drastically Cut Energy Usage

July 29, 2015

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Gallium Nitride is Poised to Become the Next Semiconductor

Using an exotic material called gallium nitride (GaN), Cambridge Electronics Inc. has announced a line of GaN transistors and power electronic circuits that promise to cut energy usage by 10 to 20 percent worldwide by 2025. In 2013, the Department of Energy (DOE) dedicated approximately half of a $140 million research institute for power electronics […]

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Hybrid Boron Nitride Nanostructures Will Keep Small Electronics Cool

July 21, 2015

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White Graphene Structures Excel at Thermal Management for Electronics

Researchers from Rice University have completed the first theoretical analysis of how 3D boron nitride might be used as a tunable material to control heat flow in small electronics devices. The research by Rouzbeh Shahsavari and Navid Sakhavand appears this month in the American Chemical Society journal Applied Materials and Interfaces. In its two-dimensional form, […]

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New Technology Could Transform Solar Energy Storage

July 21, 2015

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This New Technology Could Transform Solar Energy Storage

Chemists at UCLA have developed a new technology that is capable of storing solar energy for up to several weeks — an advance that could change the way scientists think about designing solar cells. The materials in most of today’s residential rooftop solar panels can store energy from the sun for only a few microseconds […]

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How Electrical Charge Carriers Move in Conjugated Polymers

July 15, 2015

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Solving the Mysteries of Conductivity in Polymers

In a newly published study scientists from MIT and Brookhaven National Laboratory reveal how electrical charge carriers move in conjugated polymers, potentially opening up further research on such applications. Materials known as conjugated polymers have been seen as very promising candidates for electronics applications, including capacitors, photodiodes, sensors, organic light-emitting diodes, and thermoelectric devices. But […]

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Engineers Develop a New Slimmer Design for Invisibility Cloaks

July 7, 2015

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Invisibility Cloaks Get a Slimmer Design

A team of engineers from UC San Diego have developed a new design for a cloaking device that overcomes some of the limitations of existing “invisibility cloaks.” In a new study, electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego have designed a cloaking device that is both thin and does not alter the brightness […]

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Niobium Nanowire Yarns Make High-Performance Supercapacitors

July 7, 2015

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Niobium Nanowire Improves Supercapacitors

Using yarns made from niobium nanowire, researchers at MIT have developed a new approach to making supercapacitors. Wearable electronic devices for health and fitness monitoring are a rapidly growing area of consumer electronics; one of their biggest limitations is the capacity of their tiny batteries to deliver enough power to transmit data. Now, researchers at […]

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LiquiGlide Nonstick Coating Coming to Consumer Goods

June 30, 2015

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LiquiGlide Nonstick Coating Ready for Consumer Goods

You won’t have to shake, rattle and roll those last drops of condiments out of the bottle anymore. LiquiGlide, a liquid-impregnated coating that acts as a slippery barrier between a surface and a viscous liquid, has just been licensed to a major consumer-goods company. The days of wasting condiments — and other products — that […]

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