Particle Physics News

New Results from Large Underground Xenon (LUX) Dark Matter Experiment

December 16, 2015

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New Results from the Large Underground Xenon Dark Matter Experiment

A new set of calibration techniques employed by LUX scientists has dramatically improved the sensitivity of the LUX Dark Matter Experiment. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment, which operates nearly a mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in the Black Hills of South Dakota, has already proven itself to be […]

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Physicists Make First Ever Measurement of Antiproton Interactions

November 5, 2015

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Scientists Make First Measurement of Antiproton Attraction

A team of scientists has announced the first ever measurement of antiproton interactions that make possible the existence of antimatter nuclei. The discovery gives physicists new ways to look at the forces that bind matter and antimatter. Peering at the debris from particle collisions that recreate the conditions of the very early universe, scientists have […]

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MicroBooNE Physics Experiment Detects Its First Neutrino Candidates

November 2, 2015

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The First Neutrino Event Candidates in MicroBooNE

MicroBooNE started receiving its very first neutrino beam from the Fermilab Booster accelerator on October 15, 2015. On November 2, 2015, sceiietnsts released the first neutrino event candidates that their automated neutrino event reconstruction identified. Halloween has come and gone, but Yale physicist Bonnie Fleming still has ghosts in her machine. On October 15, Fleming […]

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Glueball – A Particle Purely Made of Nuclear Force

October 20, 2015

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Glueball a Particle Purely Made of Nuclear Force

Scientists from Vienna University believe they may have discovered the long-sought-after glueball, a particle composed of pure force. For decades, scientists have been looking for so-called “glueballs”. Now it seems they have been found at last. A glueball is an exotic particle, made up entirely of gluons – the “sticky” particles that keep nuclear particles […]

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New Results from the Large Hadron Collider

October 14, 2015

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Large Hadron Collider Precisely Counts Particles

The latest experiment at Large Hadron Collider reports on the run’s very first particle collisions, and describes what an average collision between two protons looks like at 13 TeV. After a two-year hiatus, the Large Hadron Collider, the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world, began its second run of experiments in June, […]

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Plasma Wakefield Acceleration, A Step Toward Smaller Particle Colliders

September 6, 2015

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Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Could Enable Smaller Particle Colliders

In a new study, researchers detail how a technique called plasma wakefield acceleration could enable them to build more economical particle colliders. A study led by researchers from UCLA and the U.S. Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has demonstrated a more efficient way to accelerate positrons, the antimatter opposites of electrons. The method […]

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New CERN Study Suggests Subatomic Particles Could Defy the Standard Model

August 30, 2015

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LHCb Experiment Suggests Subatomic Particles Could Defy the Standard Model

New research from physicists working at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider shows evidence of leptons acting out against time-tested predictions, suggesting that subatomic particles may defy the Standard Model. The Standard Model of particle physics, which explains most of the known behaviors and interactions of fundamental subatomic particles, has held up remarkably well over several decades. […]

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CERN Experiments Reveal No Difference in Mass of Proton and Antiproton

August 18, 2015

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Experiments Reveal No Difference in Mass of Proton and Antiproton

The most precise experiments ever to compare the mass of the proton and antiproton reveal no difference between the particles, determining that the masses of the proton and antiproton are identical to eleven decimal places. The existence of our world is anything but self-evident. The Big Bang created matter and antimatter in equal measure. Why […]

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Physicists Observe Weyl Points for the First Time

July 17, 2015

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Weyl Point Confirmed by Direct Observation for the First Time

An international team of physicists has confirmed for the first time the experimental observation of Weyl points. Part of a 1929 prediction by physicist Hermann Weyl — of a kind of massless particle that features a singular point in its energy spectrum called the “Weyl point” — has finally been confirmed by direct observation for […]

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CERN Reports Observation of Pentaquark Particles

July 14, 2015

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CERN’s LHCb Experiment Detects Exotic Pentaquark Particles

Physicists at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider have reported the discovery of a class of particles known as pentaquarks. “The pentaquark is not just any new particle,” said LHCb spokesperson Guy Wilkinson. “It represents a way to aggregate quarks, namely the fundamental constituents of ordinary protons and neutrons, in a pattern that has never been observed […]

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New Tabletop Detector Identifies Single Electrons

April 21, 2015

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New Detector Sees Single Electrons

A new tabletop particle detector is able to identify single electrons in a radioactive gas, a big step toward measuring the mass of a neutrino. As the gas decays and gives off electrons, the detector uses a magnet to trap them in a magnetic bottle. A radio antenna then picks up very weak signals emitted […]

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A Way To Self-Propel Subatomic Particles Without External Forces

January 21, 2015

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Study Shows How to Self-Propel Subatomic Particles

Using a new variation on the methods used to bend light, a team of physicists reveal that subatomic particles can be induced to speed up all by themselves without the application of any external forces. Some physical principles have been considered immutable since the time of Isaac Newton: Light always travels in straight lines. No […]

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Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Milestone

November 6, 2014

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Milestone Reached in Accelerating Particles with Plasma

Researchers hit a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, boosting bunches of electrons to energies 400 to 500 times higher than they could reach traveling the same distance in a conventional accelerator. Menlo Park, California — Scientists from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the University of California, Los […]

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Interactions between Cold Dark Matter and Radiation Leads to a Dramatic Reduction in Satellite Galaxies

September 9, 2014

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Interactions between Cold Dark Matter and Radiation

A newly published study from Durham University shows that interactions between cold dark matter and radiation leads to a dramatic reduction in the number of satellite galaxies, alleviating the Milky Way’s missing satellite galaxies problem and indicating that physics beyond gravity may be essential to making accurate predictions of structure formation on small scales. Scientists […]

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Physicists Reveal a Neutron Halo Around Neutron-Rich Magnesium Nuclei

August 29, 2014

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Physicists Reveal a Neutron Halo

Using the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory, physicists have revealed that the extra neutrons in a neutron-rich magnesium nucleus produce a neutron halo. Most stable atomic nuclei are made up of roughly an equal number of protons and neutrons. With the right equipment, however, physicists can create nuclei with many additional neutrons. These neutron-rich nuclei […]

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Superabsorption Can Be Achieved and Sustained in Simple Nanostructures

August 28, 2014

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Superabsorption of Light Via Quantum Engineering

Research from the University of Oxford establishes that superabsorption can be achieved and sustained in certain simple nanostructures, by trapping the system in a highly excited state while extracting energy into a non-radiative channel. The effect offers the prospect of a new class of quantum nanotechnology, capable of absorbing light many times faster than is […]

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Magneto-Optical Trapping of Strontium Monofluoride

August 21, 2014

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Physicists Chilled Molecules to Very Near to Absolute Zero

Using magneto-optical trapping, Yale physicists cooled molecules of strontium monofluoride to 2.5 thousandths of a degree above absolute zero, the lowest temperature yet achieved by direct cooling of a molecule. It’s official. Yale physicists have chilled the world’s coolest molecules. The tiny titans in question are bits of strontium monofluoride, dropped to 2.5 thousandths of […]

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New Measurements May Help Identify Antiquark’s Role in Proton’s Spin

August 13, 2014

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Particle Physicists Measure the Spin Contribution of Antiquark

Using the STAR detector at Brookhaven National Laboratory, scientists have identified a new method sensitive to the antiquark spin, which can shed light on where these quarks and antiquarks come from. This fundamental question has been a longstanding mystery in particle physics, although it was once thought that the answer would be fairly straightforward: The […]

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