SEAS News

Engineers Develop Soft Robotic Sleeve to Help the Heart Beat

January 23, 2017

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Soft Robotic Sleeve Helps the Heart Beat

A team of researchers from Harvard University and Boston Children’s Hospital has developed a customizable soft robot that fits around the heart and helps it beat, potentially opening new treatment options for people suffering from heart failure. The soft robotic sleeve twists and compresses in synch with a beating heart, augmenting cardiovascular functions weakened by […]

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Yale Engineers Advance Quantum Technology With Photon Control

November 1, 2016

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Advancing Quantum Technology With Photon Control

Engineers from Yale University have developed a new technique to control the frequency of single photons. The ability to control the frequency of single photons is crucial to realize the potential of quantum communications and quantum computing. The current methods for changing photon frequency, however, bring with them significant drawbacks. Researchers in the lab of […]

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Harvard Engineers Create the First Fully 3D-Printed Heart-on-a-Chip

October 25, 2016

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The First 3D-Printed Heart on a Chip

Engineers from Harvard University have made the first entirely 3D-printed organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensing. Using a fully automated, digital manufacturing procedure, the 3D-printed heart-on-a-chip can be quickly fabricated and customized, allowing researchers to easily collect reliable data for short-term and long-term studies. This new approach to manufacturing may one day allow researchers to rapidly design […]

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SEAS Engineers 3D Print the First Autonomous, Entirely Soft Robot

September 1, 2016

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The First Autonomous Entirely Soft Robot

Using a 3D printer, Harvard engineers have demonstrated the first autonomous, untethered, entirely soft robot. The small robot — nicknamed the “octobot” — could pave the way for a new generation of such machines. Soft robotics could help revolutionize how humans interact with machines. But researchers have struggled to build entirely compliant robots. Electric power […]

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New Study Shows ‘Smoke Waves’ Will Affect Millions in the Coming Decades

August 23, 2016

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US Counties Risk Exposure to Pollution from Wildfires

Newly published research identifies the western U.S. counties with the highest risk of exposure to pollution from wildfires. Wildfires threaten more than land and homes. The smoke they produce contains fine particles (PM2.5) that can poison the air for hundreds of miles. Air pollution from the 2016 Fort McMurray fire in northern Alberta, Canada, sent […]

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Engineers Reveal a ‘New Universe’ of Organic Molecules That Can Store Energy in Flow Batteries

July 20, 2016

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A New Battery Inspired by Vitamins

Engineers from Harvard University have identified a whole new class of high-performing organic molecules, inspired by vitamin B2, that can safely store electricity from intermittent energy sources such as solar and wind power in large batteries. The development builds on previous work in which the team developed a high-capacity flow battery that stored energy in […]

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A New Design Strategy for Better Lithium Oxygen Batteries

July 12, 2016

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Yale Engineers Charging Toward Better Lithium Oxygen Batteries

Yale researchers have devised a method that brings marketable Li-O2 batteries closer to reality, improving both the batteries’ performance and the ability to study them. In recent years, lithium-oxygen batteries have intrigued researchers with their potential. They can store at least two to three times the energy as lithium-ion batteries can, which are the current standard […]

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New Bioprinting Technique Shows Potential for Tissue Repair and Regenerative Medicine

March 9, 2016

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Creating 3-D Tissue

New research details how scientists are moving closer to embedding vascular networks into thick human tissues, which could result in tissue repair and regeneration — and ultimately even replacement of whole organs. A team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard John A. Paulson School for Engineering and […]

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Yale Engineers Devise Quantum Technology On A Chip

January 22, 2016

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Quantum Interference in Heterogeneous Superconducting-Photonic Circuits on a Silicon Chip

Engineers at the Yale School of Engineering and Applied Science have devised a process of nanofabrication to create a silicon chip that contains all the components needed for a quantum information processor. The potential benefits of quantum technology are huge. Theoretically, it can complete in seconds certain tasks – like simulations of complex chemical processes […]

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Yale Engineers Believe Cornstarch Could Lead To Better Protective Gear

August 24, 2015

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Cornstarch Could Lead To Better Protective Gear

New research from the Yale School of Engineering & Applied Science is examining how cornstarch could lead to better protective gear for police, military and athletes. A quick scan of Eric Brown’s laboratory finds all the requisite high-tech equipment and equation-filled whiteboards. More incongruous are the many containers of Argo cornstarch – the same kind […]

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SEAS Engineers Develop More Efficient Solar Cells

August 12, 2015

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SEAS Researchers Develop More Efficient Solar Cells

Using a technique that mimics how plants use solar energy and forcing two otherwise incompatible molecules to work together to cover the full color spectrum, engineers from Yale University have significantly increased the efficiency of polymer solar cells. The researchers, in Dr. Andre Taylor’s Transformative Materials & Devices Lab, developed a solar cell that performed […]

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Harvard Engineers Create a 3D Printed Autonomous Robot

July 13, 2015

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3D Printed Soft Robot

Using a 3D printer, Harvard engineers have developed one of the first soft robots that moves autonomously. Traditional industrial robots are rigid — mostly metal — as well as fast, precise, and powerful. Their speed and accuracy come at the cost of complexity and can often pose a danger to humans who get too close. […]

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Scientists Create the First 3D Maps of Entire Folded Genomes

December 15, 2014

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The First High-Resolution 3D Maps of Entire Folded Genomes

A team of researchers has created the first 3D maps of entire folded genomes, identifying approximately 10,000 folding loops in the human genome. In a triumph for cell biology, researchers have assembled the first high-resolution, 3-D maps of entire folded genomes and found a structural basis for gene regulation, a kind of “genomic origami” that […]

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Injectable, Spontaneously Assembling Vaccines Could Fight Cancer

December 9, 2014

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New Injectable 3D Vaccines Could Fight Cancer

A newly published study from the Wyss Institute and Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences shows that programmable biomaterials can be delivered using needle injection to induce an immune response to fight cancer and infectious diseases. Cambridge, Massachusetts — One of the reasons cancer is so deadly is that it can evade attack from […]

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Chip-Scale Device Enables Yale Engineers to ‘See Without Looking’

October 20, 2014

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Yale Engineers Develop a Chip Scale Device That Uses Interaction Free Measurement

Engineers at the Yale School of Engineering & Applied Science have developed a chip-scale device that uses the wave-particle duality of single photons to sense the presence of an object without interacting with it – a technique known as “interaction-free measurement.” “Our device uses silicon photonics to create interaction-free measurement on an integrated chip—something previously […]

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Yale Engineers Develop Hybrid System for Quantum Communication

October 9, 2014

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Yale Engineers Develop System for Quantum Communication

Using microwaves and magnets, researchers at the Yale School of Engineering & Applied Science developed a hybrid system for quantum communication. Yale engineers have developed a hybrid system that strongly couples magnons—the smallest unit of measurement for a magnetic spin excitation—with microwave photons. According to the researchers, the hybrid system achieved an ultrahigh coherence between […]

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SEAS Engineers Develop an Organic Mega Flow Battery

January 9, 2014

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SEAS Engineers Develop Organic Mega Flow Battery

SEAS engineers have developed a metal-free flow battery, which relies on the electrochemistry of naturally abundant molecules called quinones, that could fundamentally transform the way electricity is stored on the grid. Cambridge, Massachusetts – A team of Harvard scientists and engineers has demonstrated a new type of battery that could fundamentally transform the way electricity […]

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New ‘Superglass’ Coating Repels Liquids and is Capable of Self-Repair

August 5, 2013

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Researchers Create Ultraslippery Coating for Glass

Using a glass honeycomb-like structure coated with a Teflon-like chemical, a team of researchers has created a “superglass” that could lead to self-cleaning, scratch-resistant windows, lenses, and solar panels. A new transparent, bioinspired coating makes ordinary glass tough, self-cleaning, and incredibly slippery, a team from Harvard University reported online July 31 in Nature Communications. The […]

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