Social Behavior News

Chimps Engage in Violent Behavior Regardless of Human Effects on Local Ecology

September 19, 2014

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Study Shows Deadly Violence a Natural Tendency in Chimps

Using data collected from 18 chimpanzee research sites, a newly published study shows that chimps engage in violent and sometimes lethal behavior regardless of human effects on local ecology. For decades, scientists studying chimpanzees in the wild have noted the ways our closest relatives are similar to humans — they form tightly knit social groups, […]

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Yale Study Shows Links between Smoking and Education

May 23, 2014

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Yale Study Shows Links between Smoking and Education

A newly published study from Yale University reveals that the links between smoking and education in adulthood are in fact explained by characteristics and choices made in adolescence. It’s well established that adults with college degrees are much less likely to smoke than adults with less education, but the reasons for this inequality are unclear. […]

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Yale Research Shows People with a Mental Illness are More Likely to Smoke

April 16, 2014

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Research Shows People with a Mental Illness are More Likely to Smoke

New research from Yale University shows that people with a mental illness are much more likely to smoke cigarettes and are less likely to quit smoking than those without mental illness. Those in the United States with a mental illness diagnosis are much more likely to smoke cigarettes and smoke more heavily, and are less […]

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UC Berkeley Study Links Sleep Deprivation to Junk Food Cravings

August 9, 2013

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Study Links Sleep Deprivation to Junk Food Cravings

A UC Berkeley has linked sleep deprivation to junk food cravings, finding that high-level brain regions required for complex judgments and decisions become blunted by a lack of sleep, while more primal brain structures that control motivation and desire are amplified. Berkeley — A sleepless night makes us more likely to reach for doughnuts or […]

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Warmer Weather and Precipitation Increase the Risk of Violence

August 5, 2013

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Slight Spikes in Temperature and Precipitation Increased the Risk of Violence and Social Upheaval

A newly published study from Princeton University and UC Berkeley reveals that slight increases in temperature and precipitation result in increased human conflict. Should climate change trigger the upsurge in heat and rainfall that scientists predict, people may face a threat just as perilous and volatile as extreme weather — each other. Researchers from Princeton […]

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Attractive Bonobo Females Are More Likely to Win Conflicts Against Males

July 15, 2013

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Attractive Females Are More likely to Win Conflicts Against Males

In a new study, evolutionary anthropologists reveal that attractive bonobo females are more likely to win conflicts against males. Female social dominance over males is rare among mammal species. Bonobos, one of our closest living relatives, are known for females holding relatively high social statuses when compared to males; though this is puzzling as the […]

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Brain Regions Associated With the Successful Spread of Ideas Identified

July 8, 2013

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Brain Regions Associated with the Successful Spread of Ideas Identified

UCLA scientists have identified for the first time the brain regions associated with the successful spread of ideas. How do ideas spread? What messages will go viral on social media, and can this be predicted? UCLA psychologists have taken a significant step toward answering these questions, identifying for the first time the brain regions associated […]

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Hunger Affects Behavior and Changes Pathways in the Brain

July 1, 2013

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Hunger Modifies Behavior and Changes Pathways in the Brain

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute have shown in a new study that hunger modifies behavior and changes pathways in the brain, revealing that hunger affects decision making and perception of risk in fruit flies. Hungry people are often difficult to deal with. A good meal can affect more than our mood, it can also […]

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Scientists Synthesize the First Biologically Effective Perfume

February 5, 2013

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Formula for a Biologically Effective Perfume

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute discovered that women prefer the smell of men who have different immune gene variants than they themselves have, cracking the olfactory code for partner selection and synthesizing the first biologically effective perfume. Individual body odor plays an important role in partner selection. Humans, mice, fish and birds, and probably […]

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Sexual Frequency between Married Couples Linked to Household Chores

January 30, 2013

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More Sex for Married Couples

A new study from the University of Washington shows that sex between married couples is linked to what types of chores each spouse completes. Married men and women who divide household chores in traditional ways report having more sex than couples who share so-called men’s and women’s work, according to a new study co-authored by […]

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Dolphins Form “Life Raft” to Try to Save Dying Companion

January 28, 2013

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Dolphins Try to Save Dying Companion

For the first time caught on video, Korean-based scientists witnessed a group of dolphins trying to help another dying dolphin by forming a “life raft.” Details of the behavior are reported in the journal Marine Mammal Science. Publication: Kyum J. Park, Hawsun Sohn, Yong R. An, Dae Y. Moon, Seok G. Choi, Doo H. An, […]

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Research Shows Frequent Multitaskers Overrate Their Ability

January 25, 2013

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Multitaskers Are Bad at It

New research from the University of Utah shows that the people most likely to multitask have the lowest multitasking ability, including people who talk on cell phones while driving. Most people believe they can multitask effectively, but a University of Utah study indicates that people who multitask the most – including talking on a cell […]

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The Hormone Oxytocin Plays a Key Role in Maintaining Social Relations in Chimpanzees

January 23, 2013

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The Hormone Oxytocin in Chimpanzees is Likely to Play a Key Role in Maintaining Social Relations

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute have discovered that cooperative relationships between chimpanzees are facilitated by an endocrinological mechanism involving the hormone oxytocin, even when these are between non-kin. Animals which maintain cooperative relationships show gains in longevity and offspring survival. However, little is known about the cognitive or hormonal mechanisms involved in cooperation. Researchers […]

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