Social Behavior News

New Yale Study Reveals That Gun Violence is a ‘Contagious’ Social Epidemic

January 9, 2017

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Yale Study Shows That Gun Violence is a ‘Contagious’ Social Epidemic

New research from Yale University reveals how gun violence spreads over social networks through a process of social contagion. Gun violence is often described as an epidemic or a public health concern, due to its alarmingly high levels in certain populations in the United States. It most often occurs within socially and economically disadvantaged minority […]

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Yale Study Shows Risk Avoidance in Older Adults is Related to Brain Anatomy, Not Age

December 13, 2016

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Neuroanatomy Accounts for Age-Related Changes in Risk

New research from Yale University and NYU reveals that older adults are less inclined to take risks due to changes in brain anatomy rather than age. The finding adds to scientific understanding of decision making and may lead to strategies for modifying changes in risk behavior as people age. Research has demonstrated that older adults […]

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New Equation Shows How Other People’s Fortunes Affect Our Happiness

June 17, 2016

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How Other People's Fortunes Affect Our Happiness

A new equation shows how our happiness depends not only on what happens to us and how this compares to other people.The team developed an equation to predict happiness in 2014, highlighting the importance of expectations, and the new updated equation also takes into account other people’s fortunes. The study, published in Nature Communications, found […]

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Children of Older Mothers Are Healthier, Taller and Obtain More Education

April 12, 2016

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Children of Older Mothers Do Better

New research shows that the benefits associated with being born in a later year outweigh the biological risks associated with being born to an older mother. Children of older mothers are healthier, taller and obtain more education than the children of younger mothers. The reason is that in industrialized countries educational opportunities are increasing, and […]

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Is There a Guide to Long Life? Scientists Examine Life Expectancy Disparities between Population Groups

October 11, 2015

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Is There a Guide to Long Life?

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute examine why life expectancy disparities between population groups have been increasing and see if there is a guide to a long life. At age 40, Finns, Swedes, and Norwegians have reached the approximate mid-point of life. It is well known that, on average, whether an individual has more or […]

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Yale Study Links Depression During Pregnancy to Risky Postpartum Sexual Behavior

August 21, 2015

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Study Links Depression During Pregnancy to Risky Postpartum Sexual Behavior

New research from Yale reveals that among young, urban women of color, depressive symptoms can start during pregnancy and can be a precursor to risky sexual behavior after a baby is born. The researchers, led by Shayna Cunningham, Ph.D., research scientist in Chronic Disease Epidemiology, did a randomized controlled trial of 1,233 females between the […]

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Hypothalamic Agrp Neurons Also Control Compulsive Behaviors

March 6, 2015

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Study Shows Hunger Neurons also Control Compulsive Behaviors

A newly published study from Yale University shows that in the absence of food Agrp neurons trigger foraging and repetitive behaviors in mice. In the absence of food, neurons that normally control appetite initiate complex, repetitive behaviors seen in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anorexia nervosa, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine […]

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Yale Study Links Increased Impulsivity and Hostility with Recreational Marijuana Use

January 16, 2015

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Study Links Increased Impulsivity and Hostility With Recreational Marijuana Use

A newly published study from Yale University found that recreational marijuana use was associated with increased impulsivity and greater hostile perceptions and behaviors. While the negative effects of chronic marijuana use are being documented in a growing body of research, it has been unclear whether recreational use of the substance produces problematic effects in everyday […]

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Yale Study Shows Strong Neighborhood Relationships Can Help Reduce Gun Violence

December 22, 2014

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Yale Study Strong Neighborhood Relationships Can Help Reduce Gun Violence

New research presented at the Institute of Medicine’s Means of Violence workshop shows that strong neighborhood ties can help reduce gun violence. The bonds that tie a neighborhood together can help shield community members from gun violence, according to new findings by Yale School of Medicine researchers in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars […]

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Targeted Computer Games Improve Neurobiological Dysfunctions of Psychopaths

December 18, 2014

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Study Shows Computer Games Can Change the Behavior of Psychopaths

New research from Yale University shows that computer games can be used to change the behavior of psychopaths, teaching them to consider emotion and other pieces of information when they make decisions. Psychopaths generally do not feel fear and fail to consider the emotions of others, or reflect upon their behavior — traits that make […]

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Chimps Engage in Violent Behavior Regardless of Human Effects on Local Ecology

September 19, 2014

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Study Shows Deadly Violence a Natural Tendency in Chimps

Using data collected from 18 chimpanzee research sites, a newly published study shows that chimps engage in violent and sometimes lethal behavior regardless of human effects on local ecology. For decades, scientists studying chimpanzees in the wild have noted the ways our closest relatives are similar to humans — they form tightly knit social groups, […]

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Yale Study Shows Links between Smoking and Education

May 23, 2014

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Yale Study Shows Links between Smoking and Education

A newly published study from Yale University reveals that the links between smoking and education in adulthood are in fact explained by characteristics and choices made in adolescence. It’s well established that adults with college degrees are much less likely to smoke than adults with less education, but the reasons for this inequality are unclear. […]

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Yale Research Shows People with a Mental Illness are More Likely to Smoke

April 16, 2014

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Research Shows People with a Mental Illness are More Likely to Smoke

New research from Yale University shows that people with a mental illness are much more likely to smoke cigarettes and are less likely to quit smoking than those without mental illness. Those in the United States with a mental illness diagnosis are much more likely to smoke cigarettes and smoke more heavily, and are less […]

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UC Berkeley Study Links Sleep Deprivation to Junk Food Cravings

August 9, 2013

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Study Links Sleep Deprivation to Junk Food Cravings

A UC Berkeley has linked sleep deprivation to junk food cravings, finding that high-level brain regions required for complex judgments and decisions become blunted by a lack of sleep, while more primal brain structures that control motivation and desire are amplified. Berkeley — A sleepless night makes us more likely to reach for doughnuts or […]

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Warmer Weather and Precipitation Increase the Risk of Violence

August 5, 2013

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Slight Spikes in Temperature and Precipitation Increased the Risk of Violence and Social Upheaval

A newly published study from Princeton University and UC Berkeley reveals that slight increases in temperature and precipitation result in increased human conflict. Should climate change trigger the upsurge in heat and rainfall that scientists predict, people may face a threat just as perilous and volatile as extreme weather — each other. Researchers from Princeton […]

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Attractive Bonobo Females Are More Likely to Win Conflicts Against Males

July 15, 2013

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Attractive Females Are More likely to Win Conflicts Against Males

In a new study, evolutionary anthropologists reveal that attractive bonobo females are more likely to win conflicts against males. Female social dominance over males is rare among mammal species. Bonobos, one of our closest living relatives, are known for females holding relatively high social statuses when compared to males; though this is puzzling as the […]

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Brain Regions Associated With the Successful Spread of Ideas Identified

July 8, 2013

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Brain Regions Associated with the Successful Spread of Ideas Identified

UCLA scientists have identified for the first time the brain regions associated with the successful spread of ideas. How do ideas spread? What messages will go viral on social media, and can this be predicted? UCLA psychologists have taken a significant step toward answering these questions, identifying for the first time the brain regions associated […]

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Hunger Affects Behavior and Changes Pathways in the Brain

July 1, 2013

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Hunger Modifies Behavior and Changes Pathways in the Brain

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute have shown in a new study that hunger modifies behavior and changes pathways in the brain, revealing that hunger affects decision making and perception of risk in fruit flies. Hungry people are often difficult to deal with. A good meal can affect more than our mood, it can also […]

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