UCLA News

New Study Reveals Amount of Water Present in the Moon May Have Been Overestimated

April 2, 2014

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New computer simulations show that the unusually hydrogen-rich apatite crystals observed in many lunar rock samples may not have formed within a water-rich environment, revealing that the amount of water present in the moon may have been overestimated. The amount of water present in the moon may have been overestimated by scientists studying the mineral […]

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New Analyses May Imply the Existence of a Dark Matter Particle

March 11, 2014

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At a recent physics symposium, scientists from around the world presented several analyses that may imply the existence of a dark matter particle. Dark matter, the mysterious substance estimated to make up approximately more than one-quarter of the mass of the universe, is crucial to the formation of galaxies, stars and even life but has […]

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Using “Multiferroics” Researchers Make Major Improvements in Computer Processing

March 6, 2014

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A team of UCLA researchers has demonstrated that using an emerging class of magnetic materials called “multiferroics” to generate spin waves could reduce wasted heat and increase power efficiency for computer processing by up to 1,000 times. Have you ever wondered why your laptop or smartphone feels warm when you’re using it? That heat is […]

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Study Reveals Why Life in Earth’s Early Oceans Increased in Size

January 24, 2014

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A newly published study examined the earliest communities of large multicellular organisms in the fossil record, revealing why life in Earth’s early oceans increased in size. Why did life forms first begin to get larger and what advantage did this increase in size provide? UCLA biologists working with an international team of scientists examined the […]

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Gemini Planet Imager Will Begin Large-Scale Survey, Studying 600 Young Stars

January 14, 2014

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The Gemini Planet Imager team will begin a large-scale survey, studying 600 young stars to see what planets orbit them. After nearly a decade of development, construction and testing, the world’s most advanced instrument for directly imaging and analyzing planets outside our solar system is now collecting light from distant worlds. The Gemini Planet Imager […]

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Hubble Sees an Asteroid with Six Comet-Like Tails

November 8, 2013

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Using the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have viewed for the first time an asteroid with six comet-like tails of dust radiating from it. Astronomers viewing our solar system’s asteroid belt with NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have seen for the first time an asteroid with six comet-like tails of dust radiating from it like spokes on […]

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New Metabolic Pathway More Efficiently Converts Sugars into Biofuels

October 1, 2013

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UCLA scientists have developed a new synthetic glycolytic pathway that converts all six glucose carbon atoms into three molecules of acetyl-CoA without losing any as carbon dioxide. UCLA chemical engineering researchers have created a new synthetic metabolic pathway for breaking down glucose that could lead to a 50 percent increase in the production of biofuels. […]

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Scientists Explain the Formation of the Unusual Third Van Allen Radiation Ring

September 23, 2013

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UCLA scientists explain the formation of an unusual third radiation ring that briefly appeared between the inner and outer Van Allen radiation belts in September 2012 and persisted for a month. Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts in 1958, space scientists have believed these belts encircling the Earth consist of two doughnut-shaped […]

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“Grid Cells” Allow the Brain to Keep Track of Navigational Cues

August 6, 2013

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A team of researchers has identified a new type of cell in the brain that helps people to keep track of their relative location while navigating new environments. Using direct human brain recordings, a research team from Drexel University, the University of Pennsylvania, UCLA and Thomas Jefferson University has identified a new type of cell […]

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Brain Regions Associated With the Successful Spread of Ideas Identified

July 8, 2013

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UCLA scientists have identified for the first time the brain regions associated with the successful spread of ideas. How do ideas spread? What messages will go viral on social media, and can this be predicted? UCLA psychologists have taken a significant step toward answering these questions, identifying for the first time the brain regions associated […]

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A Third Radiation Belt Temporarily Appears in Earth’s Upper Atmosphere

June 24, 2013

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In a new study, scientists from the UCLA Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences explain the temporary appearance and dissipation of a third radiation belt in the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts in in the Earth’s upper atmosphere in 1958, space scientists have believed that these belts consisted […]

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Researchers Link Behavioral Abnormalities and Abnormal Structure of Synapses in Fragile X Syndrome

June 4, 2013

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Using a mouse model, UCLA researchers reveal a link between the abnormal structure of synapses in Fragile X syndrome and the behavioral abnormalities at the level of brain circuits. The genetic malady known as Fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited autism and intellectual disability. Brain scientists know the gene defect that […]

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