UCLA News

Liquid Inks Create More Efficient and Cheaper Solar Cells

September 18, 2014

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Researchers Create Better Solar Cells with Liquid Inks

A team of scientists from the California NanoSystems Institute is using liquid inks to create better solar cells, improving efficiency and lowering costs. The basic function of solar cells is to harvest sunlight and turn it into electricity. Thus, it is critically important that the film that collects the light on the surface of the […]

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Biologists Delay the Aging Process by Increasing AMPK Gene

September 9, 2014

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Biologists Delay the Aging Process

Working with fruit flies, UCLA biologists showed that increasing the amount of the AMPK gene in fruit flies’ intestines increased their lifespans by about 30 percent. UCLA biologists have identified a gene that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems. Working with fruit flies, the life […]

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Consortium to Focus on Developing a New Architecture for the Internet

September 4, 2014

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Consortium to Focus on Developing a New Architecture for the Internet

UCLA will host a consortium of universities and leading technology companies on September 4 and 5 to promote the development and adoption of Named Data Networking (NDN) – an emerging Internet architecture that promises to increase network security, accommodate growing bandwidth requirements and simplify the creation of increasingly sophisticated applications. The consortium is being organized […]

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New Research Shows Protein in ‘Good Cholesterol’ Helps Reduce Pulmonary Hypertension

August 28, 2014

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Protein in HDL May Be a Key to Treating Pulmonary Hypertension

A team of researchers from UCLA has showed that a peptide mimicking part of the main protein in high-density lipoprotein may help reduce the production of oxidized lipids in pulmonary hypertension, which improved the heart and lung function in the rodent model. Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels […]

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Holey Graphene Framework Boosts the Energy Density of Electrochemical Capacitors

August 8, 2014

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Special Graphene Material Significantly Boosts the Energy Density of Electrochemical Capacitors

Scientists at UCLA have developed a new graphene material that bridges gap between traditional capacitors and batteries, boosting the energy density of electrochemical capacitors and putting them on a par with lead acid batteries. Researchers at the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at UCLA have set the stage for a watershed in mobile energy storage by […]

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Construction to Begin on the Thirty Meter Telescope

August 6, 2014

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Construction to Begin on Worlds Most Advanced Telescope

The recent approval of a sublease brings the most advanced and powerful optical telescope, the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), one step closer to reality. With the recent approval of a sublease by Hawaii’s Board of Land and Natural Resources, initial construction on the Thirty Meter Telescope — destined to be the most advanced and powerful […]

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Messenger Spacecraft Reveals Mercury’s Bizarre Magnetic Field

July 30, 2014

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Mercury Reveals How Its Interior is Different from Earth

Scientists used data from NASA’s Messenger spacecraft to reveal how Mercury’s core is different from Earth’s, explaining why the planet has such a bizarre magnetic field. Earth and Mercury are both rocky planets with iron cores, but Mercury’s interior differs from Earth’s in a way that explains why the planet has such a bizarre magnetic […]

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New Terahertz Modulator Could Lead to More Advanced Medical and Security Imaging

July 24, 2014

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New Terahertz Modulator Could Lead to More Advanced Medical and Security Imaging

Researchers from UCLA have developed a terahertz modulator that performs across a wide range of the terahertz band with very high efficiency and signal clarity, which could eventually lead to more advanced medical and security imaging systems. A UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science research team has developed a breakthrough broadband modulator […]

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Nanoscale Structures Could Yield Higher-Performance Computer Memory

June 18, 2014

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Nanoscale Structure Could Yield Higher Performance Memory

UCLA researchers have created nanoscale structures for computer chips that could yield higher-performance memory in computers, mobile electronics such as smart phones and tablets, as well as large computing systems for big data. Researchers at UCLA have created a nanoscale magnetic component for computer memory chips that could significantly improve their energy efficiency and scalability. […]

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UCLA Scientists Use Nanoparticles to Control Molecular Growth of Materials

May 27, 2014

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New Process Uses Nanoparticles to Control Molecular Growth

Scientists from UCLA have developed a new process that uses nanoparticles to control molecular growth within the “building block” components of inorganic materials. Growth is a ubiquitous phenomenon in plants and animals. But it also occurs naturally in chemicals, metals and other inorganic materials. That fact has, for decades, posed a major challenge for scientists […]

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New Class of Topological Insulators is 1,000 Times More Energy-Efficient

May 15, 2014

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UCLA Develops Magnetic Topological Insulators That Are 1,000 Times More Energy Efficient

Researchers at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science have developed a new class of topological insulators that use 1,000 times less energy to switch polarity than comparable memory structures. Topological insulators are an emerging class of materials that act as both insulators and conductors, and could potentially be used in smartphones, […]

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New Study Reveals Amount of Water Present in the Moon May Have Been Overestimated

April 2, 2014

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Mineral May Have Resulted in Overestimate of Water in the Moon

New computer simulations show that the unusually hydrogen-rich apatite crystals observed in many lunar rock samples may not have formed within a water-rich environment, revealing that the amount of water present in the moon may have been overestimated. The amount of water present in the moon may have been overestimated by scientists studying the mineral […]

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