Categories: Technology

NASA Engineers Test J-2X Powerpack

J-2X PowerPack Test

In a brief but dazzling display, a 1.86-second burst of flame emerges from the A-1 test stand at Stennis Space Center as NASA kicks off the first in a series of J-2X powerpack tests the evening of February 15. Credit: NASA/SSC

The first test was conducted yesterday on the J-2X engine powerpack by engineers at NASA’s Stennis Space Center. This initial test was the first time cryogenic fuels were introduced into the powerpack and was designed to ensure that the powerpack and facility control systems are functioning properly.

Engineers at NASA’s Stennis Space Center conducted an initial test of the J-2X engine powerpack February 15, kicking off a series of key tests in development of the rocket engine that will carry humans deeper into space than ever before.

This test is the first of about a dozen various powerpack tests that will be conducted throughout the year at Stennis. The initial test was designed to ensure powerpack and facility control systems are functioning properly. It also marked the first step in establishing start sequencing for tests and was the first time cryogenic fuels were introduced into the powerpack to ensure the integrity of the facility and the test article in preparation for full power, longer duration testing.

The powerpack is a system of components on the top portion of the J-2X engine, including the gas generator, oxygen and fuel turbopumps, and related ducts and valves. On the full J-2X engine, the powerpack system feeds the thrust chamber system which produces engine thrust.

The J-2X is being developed by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne for NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. It is the first human-rated liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen rocket engine to be developed in 40 years. The J-2X will provide upper-stage power for NASA’s Space Launch System, a new heavy-lift vehicle capable of missions beyond low-Earth orbit.

The new powerpack test series is the second for the J-2X engine. Testing of an Apollo-era powerpack at Stennis in 2008 provided critical data for development of the new, more advanced turbomachinery.

Share
By
NASA

Recent Posts

Fatty Liver Disease: A Hidden Danger to Your Brain?

A study conducted by the Roger Williams Institute of Hepatology, affiliated with King's College London…

February 8, 2023

Space Mystery: Unexpected New Ring System Discovered in Our Own Solar System

ESA’s Cheops finds an unexpected ring around dwarf planet Quaoar During a break from looking…

February 8, 2023

Smart Energy Savings: Chameleon-Like Building Material Changes Its Infrared Color

To address the challenge of saving energy in the face of increasingly frequent extreme weather…

February 8, 2023

Cancer Conundrum Solved: Researchers Unravel a Population of ‘Cheating’ Cells

The study provides answers to multiple conundrums about cancer, while also uncovering new areas for…

February 8, 2023

Unlocking the Mystery of the Stellar Initial Mass Function: A New Breakthrough Discovery

The fate of galaxies is determined by the initial mass distribution at the birth of…

February 8, 2023

NASA Awards $11.7 Million to Historically Black Colleges and Universities

NASA is awarding $11.7 million to eight Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) through the…

February 8, 2023