Medicine News

New Drug Significantly Reduces Mortality Rate After Stroke

October 12, 2015

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New Drug Significantly Cuts Mortality Rate After Stroke

New medical trials reveal that the intravenous drug Cirara significantly reduces brain swelling following a stroke. An existing drug administered intravenously reduces the chances of dying from major stroke by 60%, according to results of a phase II trial announced October 9 at the annual Neurocritical Care Society meeting in Scottsdale, Arizona. “We’ve never seen […]

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Nanoparticulate Carbon Black Found in the Lungs of Smokers

October 7, 2015

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Nanoparticulate Carbon Black Particles Start Emphysema

Two new studies identify the black material found in the lungs of smokers who died of emphysema as mostly insoluble nanoparticulate carbon black. Physicians could only guess – until recently – at the composition of the black material found in the lungs of smokers who died of emphysema. But research by Baylor College of Medicine […]

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Yale Researchers Identify RNA That Controls Cholesterol

October 7, 2015

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Researchers Identify Tiny RNA That Controls Cholesterol

A new study from Yale University reveals that miR-148a modifies LDL receptors in liver cells of both mice and humans and suppresses a gene that is critical for controlling levels of HDL cholesterol. High levels of LDL cholesterol — the “bad” cholesterol — increase the risk of heart disease, the leading cause of death in […]

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Machine-Learning Systems That Can Help Predict the Effects of Neurodegenerative Disease

October 6, 2015

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Engineers Are Building Computer Systems to Predict Alzheimer’s and Changes in the Brain

By combining MRI and other data, engineers from MIT are developing a computer system that uses genetic, demographic, and clinical data to help predict the effects of disease on brain anatomy. In experiments, they trained a machine-learning system on MRI data from patients with neurodegenerative diseases and found that supplementing that training with other patient […]

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Breakthrough Research May Lead to “Exercise in a Bottle”

October 2, 2015

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Exercise Blueprint Could Lead to New Drug Treatments That Mimic Exercise

New research from the University of Sydney reveals around 1000 molecular reactions to exercise, opening the door for drug treatments to mirror the health benefits of exercise. Drugs that mimic the benefits of exercise could soon become a reality thanks to breakthrough research from the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Center. Published in Cell Metabolism, […]

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Yale Researchers Reveal How HIV Spreads in Real Time

October 2, 2015

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Scientists Reveal How HIV Spreads in Real Time

In a newly published study, scientists from Yale University directly visualize how HIV and related retroviruses disseminate in secondary lymphoid tissues of living mice. How retroviruses like HIV spread in their hosts had been unknown — until a Yale team devised a way to watch it actually happen in a living organism. The elaborate and […]

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New Research Reveals How Flu Viruses Gain the Ability to Spread

October 1, 2015

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New Study Reveals How Flu Viruses Gain the Ability to Spread

In a new study, scientists reveal that the soft palate (the soft tissue at the back of the roof of the mouth) plays a key role in viruses’ ability to travel through the air from one person to another. The findings, described in the September 23 online edition of Nature, should help scientists better understand […]

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Yeast Protein Reveals Clues to How Alzheimer’s Forms

September 25, 2015

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Yeast Protein Offers Clues to How Alzheimer’s Disease Begins

In a newly published study, biologists from MIT detail how a yeast protein may lead to anti-amyloid therapeutic opportunities. Fibrous protein clumps known as amyloids are most often associated with diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, where they form characteristic plaques in the brain. Scientists first described amyloids about 150 years ago; they have since been […]

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New Protein-Based Sensor Detects Viral Infection, Kills Cancer Cells

September 22, 2015

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Protein-Based Sensor Detects Viral Infection and Kills Cancer Cells

Biological engineers from MIT have designed a modular system of proteins that can detect a particular DNA sequence in a cell and then trigger a specific response, such as cell death. This protein-based sensor can be customized to detect any DNA sequence in a mammalian cell and then trigger a desired response, including killing cancer […]

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New System Converts MRI Scans into 3D-Printed Heart Models for Surgical Planning

September 17, 2015

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New System Can Convert MRI Scans into 3D-Printed Models

Engineers and computer scientists at MIT and Boston Children’s Hospital have developed a new system that can convert MRI scans of a patient’s heart into 3D-printed models. The models could provide a more intuitive way for surgeons to assess and prepare for the anatomical idiosyncrasies of individual patients. “Our collaborators are convinced that this will […]

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New Porous Hydrogel Could Improve the Success of Stem Cell Tissue Regeneration

September 15, 2015

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A New Porous Hydrogel Could Boost the Success of Stem-Cell Tissue Regeneration

Using a new porous hydrogel, scientists have experimentally improved bone repair by boosting the survival rate of transplanted stem cells and influencing their cell differentiation. Possible stem cell therapies often are limited by low survival of transplanted stem cells and the lack of precise control over their differentiation into the cell types needed to repair […]

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Yale Study Shows One in Four Hepatitis C Patients Denied Initial Drug Therapy

August 28, 2015

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Yale Study Shows One in Four Hepatitis C Patients Denied Initial Care

A new study from the Yale School of Medicine found that nearly one in four patients with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) are denied initial approval for a drug therapy that treats the most common strain of the infection. The finding, published August 27 in PLOS ONE, identifies a new barrier to caring for patients with […]

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P2Y2 Receptor Helps Control Blood Pressure

August 4, 2015

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Researchers Discover New Receptor for Controlling Blood Pressure

New research from the Max Planck Institute shows that the P2Y2 receptor in blood vessel cells is a key element in the chain of blood pressure regulation. High blood pressure is a primary risk factor in the development of many cardiovascular diseases. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad […]

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Feeding Behavior in Worms May Help Shed Light on Human Heart Function

August 1, 2015

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Feeding Behavior in Worms Could Shed Light on Human Heart Function

In a new study from MIT researchers reveal that a simple roundworm has the ability to spit out potentially deadly substances — a finding that could have surprising implications for human heart research. Tasting and spitting out toxic food is a survival trait shared by many complex organisms. To feed, the worm uses its pharynx, […]

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Gene Therapy Gives Ovarian Cancer Patients Hope

July 28, 2015

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Gene Therapy Improves Survival Rates in Patients with Ovarian Cancer

A team of researchers from Harvard and Mass General Hospital has found a gene therapy that delivers a protein which suppresses the development of female reproductive organs, possibly improving the survival of patients with ovarian cancer that has recurred after chemotherapy. A gene therapy that delivers a protein that suppresses the development of female reproductive […]

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Pharmaceutical Firms “Underinvest” in Long-Term Cancer Research

July 28, 2015

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Do Firms Underinvest in Long-Term Cancer Research

A newly published study from MIT and the University of Chicago reveals that pharmaceutical firms “underinvest” in long-term research to develop new cancer-fighting drugs due to the greater time and cost required to conduct such research. Specifically, drugs to treat late-stage cancers are less costly to develop than drugs for earlier-stage cancers, partly because the […]

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Researchers Develop a New Device for Studying Changes in T Cells

July 22, 2015

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New Device Tracks Changes in T Cells

Scientists at the Yale School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells. While studying latent HIV cells, researchers in the laboratory of Prof. Kathryn Miller-Jensen have developed a device that could make it a lot easier to track changes in cells […]

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Yale Researchers Successfully Treat Eczema with Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug

July 20, 2015

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Yale Researchers Successfully Treat Eczema with Arthritis Drug

A team of scientists at Yale University used a rheumatoid arthritis drug to successfully treated patients with moderate to severe eczema. The same rheumatoid arthritis drug (tofacitinib citrate) has recently shown to reverse two other disfiguring skin conditions, vitiligo and alopecia areata. The research findings are published early online in the Journal of the American […]

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