Psychology News

Yale Researchers Show Parents Underestimate Their Children’s Weight

March 24, 2016

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Yale Study Shows Parents Underestimate Their Children's Weight

A new study form Yale University details how some parents underestimate their children’s weight, a misperception with important implications for clinical prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. Janet A. Lydecker, PhD, postdoctoral associate in psychiatry, and Carlos M. Grilo, PhD, professor of psychiatry and of psychology, and director of the Yale Program for Obesity Weight […]

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Yale Study: Climate Science Communication and the Measurement Problem

February 24, 2015

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Climate Science Literacy Unrelated to Public Acceptance of Human-Caused Global Warming

New research from Yale University shows that climate science literacy is unrelated to public acceptance of human-caused global warming. Deep public divisions over climate change are unrelated to differences in how well ordinary citizens understand scientific evidence on global warming, according to a new study published by Professor Dan Kahan. In fact, members of the […]

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Targeted Computer Games Improve Neurobiological Dysfunctions of Psychopaths

December 18, 2014

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Study Shows Computer Games Can Change the Behavior of Psychopaths

New research from Yale University shows that computer games can be used to change the behavior of psychopaths, teaching them to consider emotion and other pieces of information when they make decisions. Psychopaths generally do not feel fear and fail to consider the emotions of others, or reflect upon their behavior — traits that make […]

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Study Shows Hypertension Medication May Help Smokers Quit

December 17, 2014

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Hypertension Medication May Help Smokers Quit

A newly published study from Yale University reveals that a hypertension medication that targets stress may help smokers quit. Smokers trying to quit often light up a cigarette to deal with stress. Now an interdisciplinary team of Yale researchers has shown that guanfacine, a medication approved for treating hypertension that reduces stress and enhances cognition, […]

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Unlike People, Capuchin Monkeys Aren’t Fooled by Expensive Brands

December 3, 2014

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Monkeys Aren’t Fooled by Expensive Brands

A newly published study from Yale University shows that although Capuchin monkeys exhibit a number of irrational behaviors similar to humans, the monkeys aren’t fooled by expensive brands. In at least one respect, Capuchin monkeys are smarter than humans — they don’t assume a higher price tag means better quality, according to a new Yale […]

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Psychology and Public Health Experts Claim Regular Marijuana Use Bad for Teens’ Brains

August 11, 2014

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Researchers Show Regular Marijuana Use Bad for Teens Brains

Psychology and public health experts claim that that regular cannabis use, which they consider once a week, is not safe and may result in addiction and significant neurocognitive damage to the brains of teenagers and young adults. Washington — Frequent marijuana use can have a significant negative effect on the brains of teenagers and young […]

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Brain Regions Associated With the Successful Spread of Ideas Identified

July 8, 2013

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Brain Regions Associated with the Successful Spread of Ideas Identified

UCLA scientists have identified for the first time the brain regions associated with the successful spread of ideas. How do ideas spread? What messages will go viral on social media, and can this be predicted? UCLA psychologists have taken a significant step toward answering these questions, identifying for the first time the brain regions associated […]

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Research Shows Frequent Multitaskers Overrate Their Ability

January 25, 2013

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Multitaskers Are Bad at It

New research from the University of Utah shows that the people most likely to multitask have the lowest multitasking ability, including people who talk on cell phones while driving. Most people believe they can multitask effectively, but a University of Utah study indicates that people who multitask the most – including talking on a cell […]

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Babies Begin Learning Language in Womb

January 10, 2013

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Newborn babies only a few hours old are able to differentiate between sounds from their native language and a foreign one. A new study indicates that babies begin absorbing language while still in the womb, earlier than previously thought. The scientists published their findings in the journal Acta Paediatrica. Sensory and brain mechanisms for hearing […]

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Happier People Earn More Money

January 9, 2013

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Credit: Thinkstock

New research indicates that happier people actually earn more money. This comes as a result of a study of 10,000 Americans that showed that those who experienced more positive daily emotions and felt more satisfied with their lives while growing up, earned more income by age 29. The scientists published their findings in the journal […]

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Health Problems Future Mars Astronauts May Face

January 8, 2013

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Mars500-experiment

A newly published study found that astronauts going to Mars could have trouble sleeping, become lethargic, and have problems with mental tasks over the course of a long mission. The Mars 520-d experiment is an international test run by the Russian Academy of Science, in conjunction with the ESA and the Chinese space agency. The […]

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People Underestimate How Much They’ll Change in the Future

January 4, 2013

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A new study suggests that people’s tastes change more than they think they will. Credit: Joshua Lott/Reuters

According to a new study, many people underestimate how much they will change in the future. The scientists published their findings in the journal Science¹. Many of the choices that people make rest on assumptions. The psychologists devised a series of online experiments, in which more than 19,000 people participated. Adults between 18 and 68 […]

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Controversial Psychiatry Change Could See Bereavement as a Disease

January 3, 2013

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Credit: allspice1/Flickr

A change in the official psychiatric guidelines for depression has raised fears that grief over the death of a loved one could to be classified as clinical depression. The change is contained in new revisions to the DSM-5, a set of standards used to categorize mental illness, and it eliminates the bereavement exclusion, which exempts […]

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Kinder Children Are Happier & More Popular Than Bullies

January 3, 2013

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CREDIT: School photo via Shutterstock

New research indicates that children who are kinder are also happier and more popular. Simple acts of kindness could help reduce bullying in schools. The scientists published their findings in the journal PLoS ONE¹. Happy people often do good for others, but being more prosocial increases people’s sense of well-being. Scientists carried out an experiment […]

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Depression is the Top Disability Among US & Canadian Teens

December 24, 2012

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Credit: Shuttershock

According to a new study led by researchers at the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington in Seattle, depression has surpassed asthma as the largest contributor to ‘years lived with disabilities’ for youths aged 10 -14. The scientists published their findings in the journal The Lancet¹. The estimation of […]

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Curing Boredom

December 22, 2012

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bored-baby

Many normal situations have the potential to be unbelievably boring. Boredom is more than just one of life’s minor irritations; it has been linked to drug use, alcoholism, problematic gambling and compulsive behavior. It has even been tied to potentially lethal errors in job execution since bored personnel preform less reliably than people engaged in […]

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Nostalgia Makes Us Warm & Colder Temperatures Make Us Nostalgic

December 17, 2012

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nostalgia-warmer

Smell, touch, and music have all proven to evoke nostalgia and researchers at the University of Southampton have discovered that nostalgia is linked to the physical feeling of warmth. The scientists published their findings in the journal Emotion. The scientists recruited college students to participate in five basic studies centering around nostalgia and warmth. One […]

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Why Narcissists Seem More Attractive

December 17, 2012

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dark-shadows-johnny-depp

While most people don’t consider narcissism or psychopathy desirable qualities in their romantic partners, many are still drawn towards people with these traits, which have been immortalized in fiction as the mean girls, the dangerous boys, and arrogant jerks. The scientists published their findings in the journal Social Psychological & Personality Science. The researchers were […]

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