Social And Behavioural Sciences News

New Study Shows Individual Lifespans Are Becoming More Similar

November 28, 2016

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The Emergence of Longevous Populations

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research have discovered a novel regularity for vastly different human societies and epochs. On average, as lives get longer, the difference in the age at which people die becomes smaller. By analyzing data from 44 countries, researchers have now proven that life expectancy and the variation of […]

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Is There a Guide to Long Life? Scientists Examine Life Expectancy Disparities between Population Groups

October 11, 2015

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Is There a Guide to Long Life?

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute examine why life expectancy disparities between population groups have been increasing and see if there is a guide to a long life. At age 40, Finns, Swedes, and Norwegians have reached the approximate mid-point of life. It is well known that, on average, whether an individual has more or […]

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New Research Shows Having Kids Later is Associated with Higher Satisfaction Levels

July 7, 2015

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Having Kids Later Results in Happier Parents

A newly published study from the Max Planck Institute reveals that the satisfaction levels of parents depend not only on the number of children they have, but also on the point in time when they start a family. “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way,” according to one […]

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Yale Study Shows Links between Smoking and Education

May 23, 2014

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Yale Study Shows Links between Smoking and Education

A newly published study from Yale University reveals that the links between smoking and education in adulthood are in fact explained by characteristics and choices made in adolescence. It’s well established that adults with college degrees are much less likely to smoke than adults with less education, but the reasons for this inequality are unclear. […]

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Study Reveals Age-Related Cognitive-Motor Decline after Age 24

April 15, 2014

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Study Reveals Cognitive Motor Skills Decline after Age 24

A new study from Simon Fraser University reveals that cognitive motor performance starts to decline in individuals after age 24. It’s a hard pill to swallow, but if you’re over 24 years of age you’ve already reached your peak in terms of your cognitive motor performance, according to a new Simon Fraser University study. SFU’s […]

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Study Shows Link Between Individual Experience and Brain Structure

May 13, 2013

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New Study Examines How Individuality Develops

In a new study, neuroscientists examine how individual experiences influence the development of new neurons, leading to measurable changes in the brains of mice. How do organisms evolve into individuals that are distinguished from others by their own personal brain structure and behavior? Scientists in Dresden, Berlin, Münster, and Saarbrücken have now taken a decisive […]

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Meditation Reduces Loneliness and Expression of Inflammatory Genes

August 15, 2012

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study finds that meditation reduces loneliness

Using 40 adults between the ages of 55 and 85, a newly published study from UCLA scientists found that a two-month program of mindfulness-based stress reduction successfully reduced the feelings of loneliness and the expression of inflammatory genes. Many elderly people spend their last years alone. Spouses pass and children scatter. But being lonely is […]

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Study Suggests Whole Fruit May Prompt Kids to Make Healthier Choices

July 25, 2012

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fruit prompts kids to make better food choices

A study by scientists at Cornell’s Center for Behavioral Economics in Child Nutrition Programs suggests that the presence of certain foods in school cafeterias may prompt kids to make healthier lunch choices. Just because healthful foods are available in school cafeterias doesn’t mean children are going to eat them, but in some cases, the very […]

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Protective Factors are Important in Preventing Violence in Veterans

June 26, 2012

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factors related to violence in veterans

A new study from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine suggests veterans with protective factors in place such as employment, spiritual faith, living stability, and social support were 92 percent less likely to report severe violence than veterans without these factors. Chapel Hill, North Carolina – A national survey identifies which U.S. military […]

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Email Data Reveals Global Migration Trends

June 25, 2012

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Global migration trends discovered in email data

By analyzing the countries derived from IP addresses for a set of messages sent by 43 million anonymous Yahoo! account holders between September 2009 and June 2011, Max Planck researchers calculated the rates of migration to and from almost every country in the world. For the first time comparable migration data is available for almost […]

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