September 4, 2012

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NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Completes First Deep-Space Maneuver

NASA’s Juno spacecraft

NASA’s Juno spacecraft successfully performed its first deep-space maneuver, firing its main engine and changing its trajectory as it continues on its mission towards Jupiter. Pasadena, California – Earlier today, navigators and mission controllers for NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter watched their computer screens as their spacecraft successfully performed its first deep-space maneuver. This first […]

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September 4, 2012

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Spin-Velocity Correlation in an Ultracold, Dilute Gas of Atoms

spin-velocity correlation in an ultracold, dilute gas of atoms

A newly published study details how MIT scientists create and detect spin-orbit coupling in an atomic Fermi gas, a highly controllable form of quantum degenerate matter. Elementary particles have a property called “spin” that can be thought of as rotation around their axes. In work reported this week in the journal Physical Review Letters, MIT […]

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September 3, 2012

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Hubble Image of NGC 5806 with a Supernova Explosion

NGC 5806

This Hubble image shows spiral galaxy NGC 5806, which is located in the constellation Virgo roughly 80 million light years from Earth, and a supernova explosion called SN 2004dg. A new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows NGC 5806, a spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo (the Virgin). It lies around 80 million […]

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August 31, 2012

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Genome Study Links Paternal Age to Conditions Such As Autism

mutation-sperm

J.B.S. Haldane proposed in the 1930s that children might inherit more mutations from their fathers than their mothers. This year, thanks to whole-genome sequencing of dozens of Icelandic families, it has been proven that the age at which a father sires children determines how many mutations those offspring actually inherit. The scientists published their findings […]

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August 31, 2012

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Study Reveals How Lis1 Regulates Dynein Motility

By using common baker’s yeast as a model system, Harvard researchers discovered how the key motor protein dynein interacts with a molecule called Lis1. Molecular motors keep us alive. These cellular transport services, built from proteins, circulate essential chemical packages between the heart of the cell, the nucleus, and the cell periphery. In elongated cells […]

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August 31, 2012

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New Nano-Scale Device Can Weigh Individual Molecules

A gold particle five nanometers in width weighs just a few megadaltons, a tiny unit of measure used in biochemistry that is equivalent to the atomic mass unit. However, researchers at the California Institute of Technology and CEA-Leti, a government-funded research organization in Grenoble, France, have built a scale that weighs single objects, including nano-particles and […]

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August 31, 2012

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The Counterintuitive Behavior of the Cucumber Tendril

plant’s tendrils leads researchers to unusual spring

A new study from scientists at Harvard University describes the mechanism by which coiling occurs in the cucumber plant and suggests designs for biomimetic twistless springs with tunable mechanical responses. Harvard researchers, captivated by a strange coiling behavior in the grasping tendrils of the cucumber plant, have characterized a new type of spring that is […]

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August 31, 2012

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Natural Color View of Saturn and Titan

natural color view of Titan and Saturn from NASA's Cassini spacecraft

Created from by combining six images from the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera, this mosaic shows a natural color view of Saturn and Titan. A giant of a moon appears before a giant of a planet undergoing seasonal changes in this natural color view of Titan and Saturn from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, […]

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August 31, 2012

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Tuberculosis Resistance to Backup Drugs Increases

drug-resistant-tuberculosis

According to a new study, more than 40% of tuberculosis infections that are resistant to front-line antibiotic treatments have also become resistant to some common backup drugs. Efforts to control tuberculosis are being hindered by the emergence of multi drug-resistant (MDR) strains, making it harder to combat. Researchers published their findings in the journal The […]

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August 31, 2012

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Ancient Genome Reveals Relationships between Denisovans and Present-Day Humans

researchers describe Denisovan genome

A newly published study compares the Denisovan genome with those of the Neandertals and eleven modern humans from around the world, finding that modern populations from the islands of southeastern Asia share genes with the Denisovans and that the genomes of people from East Asia and South America include slightly more genes from Neandertals than […]

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August 31, 2012

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LRO Radar Data Indicates that the Walls of Shackleton Crater May Hold Ice

data indicate that the walls of Shackleton crater may hold ice

Using the Mini-RF radar on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, a team of scientists have estimated that as much as five to ten percent of material, by weight, could be patchy ice in the walls of Shackleton crater. Scientists using the Mini-RF radar on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) have estimated the maximum amount of ice […]

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August 31, 2012

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A Superbubble in NGC 1929

NGC 1929

Using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the Max-Planck-ESO telescope, this composite image shows a superbubble in NGC 1929, which is a star cluster embedded in the N44 nebula found in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This composite image shows a superbubble in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small satellite […]

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