Physics News RSS feed for this section

New Research Helps Uncover the Mechanism Behind Solid-Solid Phase Transitions

September 15, 2014

1 Comment

Researchers Discover Mechanism Behind Solid-Solid Phase Transitions

An international team of researchers helps uncover mechanism behind solid-solid phase transitions, providing new insight for all sorts of solid-solid phase transformations. Two solids made of the same elements but with different geometric arrangements of the atoms, or crystal phases, can produce materials with different properties. Coal and diamond offer a spectacular example of this […]

Continue reading...

Using ‘Solid’ Light to Answer Previously Unsolvable Problems

September 10, 2014

2 Comments

Artificial Atom Could Help Answer Fundamental Questions about the Physics of Matter

By crystallizing light, Princeton University researchers have begun to address questions about the fundamental study of matter. The researchers are not shining light through crystal – they are transforming light into crystal. As part of an effort to develop exotic materials such as room-temperature superconductors, the researchers have locked together photons, the basic element of […]

Continue reading...

Experimental Cosmologists Probe Beyond the Big Bang

September 5, 2014

1 Comment

Cornell-Cosmologists-Probe-Beyond-the-Big-Bang

Cornell’s experimental cosmology research group recently announced the first results from a Cosmic Microwave Background study using a polarization-sensitive camera (ACTPol). A long tradition of cosmology research in Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences has given birth to a vigorous effort by a new generation of cosmologists to understand the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), the […]

Continue reading...

New Titania-Based Material Shows Promise as Superconductor Insulator

September 4, 2014

0 Comments

Titania Based Material Shows Promise as New Superconductor Insulator

In a newly published study, a team of researchers at North Carolina State University detail a new titania-based material that shows promise as an insulator for superconductors. Research from North Carolina State University shows that a type of modified titania, or titanium dioxide, holds promise as an electrical insulator for superconducting magnets, allowing heat to […]

Continue reading...

Physicists Reveal a Neutron Halo Around Neutron-Rich Magnesium Nuclei

August 29, 2014

0 Comments

Physicists Reveal a Neutron Halo

Using the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory, physicists have revealed that the extra neutrons in a neutron-rich magnesium nucleus produce a neutron halo. Most stable atomic nuclei are made up of roughly an equal number of protons and neutrons. With the right equipment, however, physicists can create nuclei with many additional neutrons. These neutron-rich nuclei […]

Continue reading...

Superabsorption Can Be Achieved and Sustained in Simple Nanostructures

August 28, 2014

1 Comment

Superabsorption of Light Via Quantum Engineering

Research from the University of Oxford establishes that superabsorption can be achieved and sustained in certain simple nanostructures, by trapping the system in a highly excited state while extracting energy into a non-radiative channel. The effect offers the prospect of a new class of quantum nanotechnology, capable of absorbing light many times faster than is […]

Continue reading...

Physicists Detect Neutrinos in the Sun’s Core

August 28, 2014

0 Comments

Physicists Detect Neutrinos Created by the Proton-Proton Fusion in the Sun

For the first time, an international team of physicists has directly detected neutrinos created by the proton-proton fusion process going on at the sun’s core. Amherst, Massachusetts – Using one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors on the planet, an international team of physicists including Andrea Pocar, Laura Cadonati and doctoral student Keith Otis at […]

Continue reading...

Physicists Preserve Spin Information for Much Longer than Previously Possible

August 25, 2014

0 Comments

Physicists Manipulate Spin Information in Graphene with Electric Fields

By isolating the spin information from the influence of the outside world in a nanoscale graphene device, physicists have found a way to preserve spin information for much longer than previously possible. Researchers from the FOM Foundation and University of Groningen have found a way to preserve spin information for much longer than previously possible. […]

Continue reading...

Mysterious 3D Grid of Quantum “Tornadoes” in Liquid Helium Revealed

August 22, 2014

1 Comment

Experiment Reveals Mysterious 3D Grid of Quantum Tornadoes in Liquid Helium

A new experiment at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory revealed a 3D grid of quantum “tornadoes” inside microscopic droplets of supercooled liquid helium, allowing scientists to see a manifestation of the quantum world on a macroscopic scale for the first time. Menlo Park, California — An experiment at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator […]

Continue reading...

Magneto-Optical Trapping of Strontium Monofluoride

August 21, 2014

1 Comment

Physicists Chilled Molecules to Very Near to Absolute Zero

Using magneto-optical trapping, Yale physicists cooled molecules of strontium monofluoride to 2.5 thousandths of a degree above absolute zero, the lowest temperature yet achieved by direct cooling of a molecule. It’s official. Yale physicists have chilled the world’s coolest molecules. The tiny titans in question are bits of strontium monofluoride, dropped to 2.5 thousandths of […]

Continue reading...

Theorists Show How Energy Landscapes Dominate Both Evolution and Folding of Proteins

August 19, 2014

0 Comments

Theorists Show How Energy Landscapes Dominate Both Evolution and Folding of Proteins

A team of biophysicists at Rice University used computer models to show that the energy landscape involved in the long-term evolution of proteins is essentially the same as that involved in the folding process that takes as little as microseconds. Nature’s artistic and engineering skills are evident in proteins, life’s robust molecular machines. Scientists at […]

Continue reading...

Higgs Boson May Explain the Earliest Expansion of the Universe

August 15, 2014

3 Comments

Higgs Versus the Big Bang

In a newly published study, physicists propose that the Higgs boson, which was recently confirmed to be the origin of mass, may also be responsible for the mode of inflation and shape of the Universe shortly after the Big Bang. Fedor Bezrukov from the RIKEN–BNL Research Center and Mikhail Shaposhnikov from the Swiss Federal Institute […]

Continue reading...

New Measurements May Help Identify Antiquark’s Role in Proton’s Spin

August 13, 2014

5 Comments

Particle Physicists Measure the Spin Contribution of Antiquark

Using the STAR detector at Brookhaven National Laboratory, scientists have identified a new method sensitive to the antiquark spin, which can shed light on where these quarks and antiquarks come from. This fundamental question has been a longstanding mystery in particle physics, although it was once thought that the answer would be fairly straightforward: The […]

Continue reading...

Our Universe May Have Emerged from a Black Hole in a Higher Dimensional Universe

August 8, 2014

44 Comments

Our Universe May Have Emerged from a Black Hole in a Higher Dimensional Universe

New research from theoretical physicists at the Perimeter Institute proposes that our universe may have emerged from a black hole in a higher-dimensional universe. The big bang poses a big question: if it was indeed the cataclysm that blasted our universe into existence 13.7 billion years ago, what sparked it? Three Perimeter Institute researchers have […]

Continue reading...

Atomic Scale Imaging of Magnetic Structures

August 6, 2014

0 Comments

Atomic Scale Imaging of Magnetic Structures

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research use atomic scale imaging of magnetic structures to study new aspects of high-temperature superconductivity. Superconductors raise many hopes, especially materials which lose their electrical resistance at quite high temperatures – be it for high-performance medical imaging technologies, the energy transportation or for maglev trains. High-temperature […]

Continue reading...

Engineers Clear a Path Toward Better Quantum Computers and Nanoscale Sensors

August 5, 2014

1 Comment

A Path Toward Better Quantum Computers and Nanoscale Sensors

Engineers at the University of Chicago have used a diamond defect called a nitrogen vacancy center to clear a path toward better quantum computers and nanoscale sensors. By carefully controlling the position of an atomic-scale diamond defect within a volume smaller than what some viruses would fill, researchers have cleared a path toward better quantum […]

Continue reading...

Scientists Demonstrate Experimentally that SmB6 is a Topological Insulator

July 30, 2014

0 Comments

Scientists Demonstrate Experimentally that SmB6 is a Topological Insulator

An international team of scientists has demonstrated experimentally, for the first time, that SmB6 is indeed a topological insulator. Spintronics is an emerging field of electronics, where devices work by manipulating the spin of electrons rather than the current generated by their motion. This field can offer significant advantages to computer technology. Controlling electron spin […]

Continue reading...

Physicists Measure Magnetic Interactions between Single Electrons

July 28, 2014

1 Comment

Weizmann Physicists Measure Magnetic Interactions between Single Electrons

By using a technique that binds two electrons together so that their spins point in opposite directions, physicists at the Weizmann Institute of Science were able to measure magnetic interactions between single electrons. Imagine trying to measure a tennis ball that bounces wildly, every time to a distance a million times its own size. The […]

Continue reading...