Cell Biology News

Yale Scientists Track the Development of the Embryo

January 2, 2017

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Researchers Track the Development of the Embryo

Scientists at Yale University have discovered a way to track the precise bits of RNA that control the development of the embryo into trillions of specialized cells in a living animal. The new assay, tested on the genome of zebra fish, allows scientists to pinpoint function of myriad of signals activated after fertilization. “The problem […]

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Inhibiting the AIM2 Pathway Could Potentially Limit Radiation Damage to Cells

November 11, 2016

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Study Pinpoints Protein That Detects Damage from Radiation

New research from Yale University shows that a drug that blocks or inhibits the AIM2 pathway could potentially limit the deleterious side effect of chemotherapy or radiotherapy on cancer patients. High doses of radiation from cancer treatment can cause severe damage to cells and tissues, resulting in injury to bone marrow and the gastrointestinal tract. […]

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Researchers Identify a New Way to Suppress Lung Tumors

October 3, 2016

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A New Way to Suppress Lung Tumors

A team of researchers has identified a new blocking mechanism that acts more like a dimmer switch and potently inhibits lung tumor cell growth. Lung cancer cell growth depends on certain proteins that require the addition of sugar molecule chains to become active. Scientists have long thought that the addition of these sugar chains is […]

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New Yale Studies Explore the Science of Cardiovascular Diseases

September 26, 2016

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Cardiologists Explore the Science of Cardiovascular Diseases

Yale University scientists detail how basic science research insights are key to future breakthroughs in cardiovascular disease. Professor of cardiology Martin A. Schwartz led two recently published studies that advance knowledge of the underlying biology of cardiovascular diseases, which are among the most common causes of chronic illness and death worldwide. The first study, published […]

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Genomic Regions That Set Humans Apart From Other Primates Carry Many Autism-Linked Mutations

September 22, 2016

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Autism and Evolution

New research from Harvard Medical School suggests that mutations in genetic regulatory elements may be important in both autism spectrum disorder and human evolution. Small regions of the genome where humans have diverged from chimpanzees contain a variety of mutations implicated in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, report Harvard Medical School researchers at Boston Children’s […]

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MIT Biologists Reveal How lncRNA Helps to Control Cell Fate

September 12, 2016

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Biologists Discover How RNA Helps Control Cell Fate

New research details how biologists from MIT deciphered the structure of one type of long noncoding RNA and used that information to figure out how it interacts with a cellular protein to control the development of heart muscle cells. Several years ago, biologists discovered a new type of genetic material known as long noncoding RNA. […]

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UCSD Researchers Use Adenosine to Command Stem Cells to Build New Bone

September 1, 2016

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Researchers Command Stem Cells to Build New Bone

A team of scientists from UC San Diego have discovered an easy and efficient way to coax human pluripotent stem cells to regenerate bone tissue — by feeding them adenosine, a naturally occurring molecule in the body. The stem-cell-derived bone tissue helped repair cranial bone defects in mice without developing tumors or causing infection. The […]

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Study Reveals a Promising New Target to Treat Type 2 Diabetes

August 31, 2016

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Yale Study Reveals Protein to Target in Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists at Yale University reveal promising new target for drugs to treat type 2 diabetes. When the body’s cells don’t respond normally to insulin — a condition known as insulin resistance — blood glucose levels can increase, resulting in type 2 diabetes. Researchers have long known that insulin resistance is linked to defects in the […]

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Harvard Researchers Identify a Key Instigator in Lou Gehrig’s Disease

August 26, 2016

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Scientists Identify Instigator That Ignites Nerve Cell Damage in Lou Gehrig’s Disease

A team of scientists from Harvard Medical School has identified a key instigator of nerve cell damage in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorder. Researchers say the findings of their study, published in the journal Science, may lead to new therapies to halt the progression of the uniformly fatal disease […]

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MIT Biological Engineers Program Human Cells to Store Complex Histories in Their DNA

August 22, 2016

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Recording Analog Memories in Human Cells

Newly published research details how biological engineers from MIT developed a way to record complex histories in the DNA of human cells, allowing them to retrieve “memories” of past events by sequencing the DNA. This analog memory storage system — the first that can record the duration and/or intensity of events in human cells — […]

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Yale Scientists Recode Organisms to Resist Viral Contamination

July 18, 2016

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Scientists Recode Organisms to Resist Viral Contamination

Scientists from Yale University have discovered a novel way to combat viral contamination of bio-factories that produce a growing number of drugs, chemicals, and fuels. The new method involves recoding organisms to stop horizontal transfer of genes — which viruses use to infect and hijack cellular machinery to reproduce. The study is published in the […]

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New Study Improves Our Understanding of Intercellular Communication

July 6, 2016

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Biologists Improve Our Understanding of Intercellular Communication

New research reveals how cells can pack and release active ephrins and Eph receptors through extracellular vesicles, improving our understanding of intercellular communication and paving the way for new therapeutic strategies. Eph receptors and their partner proteins, the ephrins, are vital for intercellular communication. In the developing brain, they guide young neurons to the right […]

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Yale Study Reveals How a Cancer Gene Promotes Tumor Growth

June 27, 2016

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How a Cancer Gene Promotes Tumor Growth

A new discovery by Yale researchers may help lead to individualized treatments for lung cancer and other types of cancer. A Yale-led study describes how a known cancer gene, EGFR, silences genes that typically suppress tumors. The finding, published in Cell Reports, may lead to the development of more effective, individualized treatment for patients with […]

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New Findings Provide a Design for an HIV Vaccine Germline-Targeting Immunogen

March 28, 2016

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Scientists Announce New Anti-HIV Agent

A team of researchers has found HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells that are present in most people, and has described the design of an HIV vaccine germline-targeting immunogen capable of binding those B cells. Some people infected with HIV naturally produce antibodies that effectively neutralize many strains of the rapidly mutating virus, and […]

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Yale Study Shows Key Protein In Pancreatic Cancer Growth May Also Be Its Undoing

March 14, 2016

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A New Target for Attacking Pancreatic Cancer

In a newly published study, Yale scientists reveal that the overexpression of a protein called renalase in pancreatic cancer plays a critical role in spurring the cancer’s growth while also providing a possible new target for attacking the tumors it helps develop. Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, causing about 40,000 deaths annually […]

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Scientists Reveal Amino Acids Supply Most Building Blocks for Tumor Cells

March 8, 2016

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Amino Acids Supply Most Building Blocks for Tumor Cells

New research shows that amino acids, not glucose, account for the majority of cell mass in proliferating mammalian cells. Cancer cells are notorious for their ability to divide uncontrollably and generate hordes of new tumor cells. Most of the fuel consumed by these rapidly proliferating cells is glucose, a type of sugar. Scientists had believed […]

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Yale Study Shows Gut Bacteria Aggressively Protect Their Territory

March 8, 2016

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Study Shows Friendly Bacteria Aggressively Protect Their Territory

A newly published study from Yale University details how human gut bacteria take on many tasks crucial to health. Bacterially speaking, it gets very crowded in the human gut, with trillions of cells jostling for a position to carry out a host of specialized and often crucial tasks. A new Yale study, published the week […]

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MIT Research Shows How Diet Influences Colon Cancer

March 2, 2016

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MIT Study Shows How Diet Influences Colon Cancer

New research from MIT reveals ties high-fat diet to changes in intestinal stem cells, helping to explain an increased cancer risk. Over the past decade, studies have found that obesity and eating a high-fat, high-calorie diet are significant risk factors for many types of cancer. Now, a new study from MIT reveals how a high-fat […]

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