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Carnufex Carolinensis – North America’s Top Predator Before Dinosaurs?

March 20, 2015

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Carnufex Carolinensis

New research from North Carolina State University shows that a 9-foot long crocodile ancestor may have been North America’s top predator before the dinosaurs arrived. A newly discovered crocodilian ancestor may have filled one of North America’s top predator roles before dinosaurs arrived on the continent. Carnufex carolinensis, or the “Carolina Butcher,” was a 9-foot […]

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Neuroscientists Find That Cognitive Skills Peak at Different Ages

March 10, 2015

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Cognitive Skills Peak at Different Ages Across Adulthood

New research from neuroscientists at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital reveals that different parts of the brain work best at different ages. Scientists have long known that our ability to think quickly and recall information, also known as fluid intelligence, peaks around age 20 and then begins a slow decline. However, more recent findings, including […]

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Yale Study Reveals Connection Between Genes That Contribute to Autism

March 10, 2015

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Study Shows Connection Between Key Autism Risk Genes

A newly published study from Yale University reveals an important connection between key autism risk genes in the human brain, a major step toward understanding how brain development goes awry in some individuals with the disorder. The research shows that CHD8, a gene that is strongly linked to autism, acts as a master regulator in […]

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EPFL Sheds New Light on the Fundamental Mechanisms of Heat Dissipation in Graphene

March 6, 2015

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Researchers Shed New Light on the Fundamental Mechanisms of Heat Dissipation in Graphene

Scientists from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne shed new light on the fundamental mechanisms of heat dissipation in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. In the race to miniaturize electronic components, researchers are challenged with a major problem: the smaller or the faster your device, the more challenging it is to cool it down. One solution […]

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Scientists Reproduce the Building Blocks of Life

March 4, 2015

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The Building Blocks of Life Reproduced in a Laboratory

Scientists from NASA’s Ames Research Center have demonstrated for the first time that they can make uracil, cytosine, and thymine, all three components of RNA and DNA, non-biologically in a laboratory under conditions found in space. NASA scientists studying the origin of life have reproduced uracil, cytosine, and thymine, three key components of our hereditary […]

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Hubble 25th Anniversary Video – Meet Edwin Hubble

February 27, 2015

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Hubble 25th Anniversary Video

The Hubble Space Telescope is named after one of the preeminent astronomers of the last century, Edwin Hubble. This six minute video takes us on a journey through the life and times of the namesake of one of the most significant scientific instruments ever built. The famous Hubble Space Telescope marks 25 years of observations […]

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Yale Study: Climate Science Communication and the Measurement Problem

February 24, 2015

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Climate Science Literacy Unrelated to Public Acceptance of Human-Caused Global Warming

New research from Yale University shows that climate science literacy is unrelated to public acceptance of human-caused global warming. Deep public divisions over climate change are unrelated to differences in how well ordinary citizens understand scientific evidence on global warming, according to a new study published by Professor Dan Kahan. In fact, members of the […]

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Neuroscientists Examine How Brain Waves Guide Memory Formation

February 23, 2015

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Neuroscientists Reveal How Brain Waves Guide Memory Formation

New research from MIT shows that the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex use two different brain-wave frequencies to communicate as the brain learns to associate unrelated objects. Our brains generate a constant hum of activity: As neurons fire, they produce brain waves that oscillate at different frequencies. Long thought to be merely a byproduct of […]

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Isotopic Evidence Shows Life Could Have Flourished on Earth 3.2 Billion Years Ago

February 17, 2015

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Life Could Have Flourished on Earth 3.2 Billion Years Ago

New research from the University of Washington found evidence that life was pulling nitrogen out of the air and converting it into a form that could support larger communities 3.2 billion years ago. A spark from a lightning bolt, interstellar dust, or a subsea volcano could have triggered the very first life on Earth. But […]

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Nanoscale Cage Allows Before-and-After Sequencing of DNA Strand

February 13, 2015

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Nanoscale Cage Could Improve Nanopore Technology

Brown University researchers have designed a nanoscale cage that can trap a single DNA strand and allow before-and-after sequencing of the same DNA strand. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — Despite having a diameter tens of thousands of times smaller than a human hair, nanopores could be the next big thing in DNA sequencing. By […]

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A Closer Look at the Icy Conditions of Comets

February 11, 2015

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Study-Helps-Explain-Comet-Composition

New research from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory used a cryostat instrument, nicknamed “Himalaya,” to study the icy conditions under which comets form. Astronomers tinkering with ice and organics in the lab may have discovered why comets are encased in a hard, outer crust. Using an icebox-like instrument nicknamed Himalaya, the researchers show that fluffy ice […]

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New Insight Into HIV Vaccination Strategies

February 6, 2015

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New Research Yields Insight Into Generating Antibodies That Target Different Strains of HIV

New research yields insight into generating antibodies that target different strains of HIV, suggesting that sequentially administering several different forms of a potential HIV vaccine could stimulate a stronger immune response than delivering a cocktail of these variants all at once. Through an investigation of a fundamental process that guides the maturation of immune cells, […]

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Crystal Boundaries Can Enhance, or Reduce, Hydrogen Embrittlement

February 5, 2015

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Analysis Shows How to Prevent Metal Embrittlement

A newly published study from MIT details how certain crystal boundaries can enhance, or reduce, the damaging effects that lead to metal embrittlement. When a metal tube lines an oil well thousands of feet below the surface of the ocean, that metal had better be solid and reliable. Unfortunately, the environment in such deep wells […]

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High-Speed Images Reveal How Raindrops Spread Pathogens Among Plants

February 4, 2015

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How Raindrops Spread Pathogens Among Plants

A new theoretical model describes the relationship between a leaf’s flexibility, the fragmentation of the fluid, and its resulting pattern of raindrop-induced dispersal. Using high-speed images of raindrops splashing down on leaves, the researchers show that raindrops can act as a dispersing agent of contaminated droplets from one plant to another. Historical weather records suggest […]

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Archaeologists Reveal Factors that Contributed to the Demise of Early Rapa Nui Society

January 28, 2015

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Archaeologists Clarify Factors that Contributed to the Demise of Early Rapa Nui Society

Using flakes of obsidian as a dating tool, a newly published study helps clarify the factors that contributed to the demise of early Rapa Nui society. Long before the Europeans arrived on Easter Island in 1722, the native Polynesian culture known as Rapa Nui showed signs of demographic decline. However, the catalyst has long been […]

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Conformational Changes of EF-G on the Ribosome During tRNA Translocation

January 21, 2015

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Study Shows Ribosomal Motor is Crucial Part of Cellular Protein Factory

New research from Yale University provides insights into the conformational space that EF-G samples on the ribosome and reveals that tRNA translocation on the ribosome is facilitated by a structural transition of EF-G from a compact to an elongated conformation, which can be prevented by the antibiotic dityromycin. The ribosome is the protein-making “factory” within […]

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Earth’s Earliest Primates Lived in Trees

January 20, 2015

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Earth’s Earliest Primates Lived in Trees

New research from Yale University reveals that Earth’s earliest primates lived in trees. Earth’s earliest primates have taken a step up in the world, now that researchers have gotten a good look at their ankles. A new study has found that Purgatorius, a small mammal that lived on a diet of fruit and insects, was […]

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