May 15, 2015

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A Promising New Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

Researchers Solve Multiple Sclerosis Puzzle

New research shows that auto-reactive T cells in MS patients produce different types of inflammatory hormones called cytokines than they do in healthy subjects, opening the door to new treatments for the disease. Evidence has long suggested multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease, but researchers have been puzzled because they found the same T […]

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May 15, 2015

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New Mathematical Model Helps Predicts Optimal Use of Antibiotics

Mathematical Model Predicts Optimal Use of Antibiotics

Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have developed a new mathematical model to help predict the optimal dosing of antibiotics. Although antibiotics were first introduced more than 70 years ago, substantial uncertainty remains about how the drugs should be used by patients to ensure recovery, while minimizing toxic side effects and the risk […]

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May 15, 2015

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Gene Expression Evolves Best Under a House-of-Cards Model

Gene Expression Evolves Under a House-of-Cards Model

Using sophisticated modeling of genomic data from diverse species, scientists from Yale University have answered a longstanding question about which competing model of evolution works best. Their research suggests that the “house of cards” model — which holds that mutations with large effects effectively reshuffle the genomic deck — explains evolutionary processes better than the […]

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May 15, 2015

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Kepler Observes Neptune and Its Moons Triton and Nereid

Kepler Observes Neptune and Its Moons

Seventy days worth of solar system observations from NASA’s Kepler spacecraft, taken during its reinvented “K2″ mission, are highlighted in this sped-up movie. The planet Neptune appears on day 15, followed by its moon Triton, which looks small and faint. Keen-eyed observers can also spot Neptune’s tiny moon Nereid at day 24. Neptune is not […]

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May 15, 2015

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Antarctica’s Larsen B Ice Shelf Will Disintegrate Before the End of the Decade

Antarctica’s Larsen B Ice Shelf Nearing Its Final Act

A newly published NASA study reveals that the last remaining section of Antarctica’s Larsen B Ice Shelf is weakening and will likely to disintegrate completely before the end of the decade. A team led by Ala Khazendar of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, found the remnant of the Larsen B Ice Shelf […]

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May 15, 2015

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Hubble Reveals Diffusion of Stars Through the Core of the Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae

Astronomers Measure the Rate of Diffusion of Stars Through the Core of the Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae

New images from the Hubble Space Telescope show for the first time snapshots of white dwarf stars beginning their 40-million-year migration from the crowded center of an ancient star cluster to the less populated suburbs. White dwarfs are the burned-out relics of stars that rapidly lose mass, cool down and shut off their nuclear furnaces. […]

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May 14, 2015

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Strangulation is the Primary Mechanism for Star Formation Shut Down

Strangulation Primary Mechanism for Galaxy Star Formation Shut Down

Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, astronomers from the University of Cambridge detail why certain galaxies can longer produce stars. As murder mysteries go, it’s a big one: how do galaxies die and what kills them? A new study, published today in the journal Nature, has found that the primary cause of galactic […]

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May 14, 2015

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A New Study Links Infant Antibiotic Use to Adult Diseases

Infant Antibiotic Use Linked to Adult Diseases

New research from the University of Minnesota reveals a three-way link among antibiotic use in infants, changes in the gut bacteria, and disease later in life. Imbalances in gut microbes have been tied to infectious diseases, allergies and other autoimmune disorders, and even obesity. The study, led by Biomedical Informatics and Computational Biology program graduate […]

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May 14, 2015

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Galactic Cosmic Rays Can Cause Dementia-Like Symptoms During Extended Space Travel

Study Shows Extended Space Travel May Warp Astronauts' Brains

A new study from UC Irvine shows that galactic cosmic rays can cause dementia-like symptoms, making extended space trips to locations such as Mars more difficult to accomplish. What happens to an astronaut’s brain during a mission to Mars? Nothing good. It’s besieged by destructive particles that can forever impair cognition, according to a UC […]

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May 14, 2015

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New Shortcut Simplifies the Production of Solar Cells

Researchers Develop a New Shortcut to Solar Cells

By using the top electrode as the catalyst that turns plain silicon into valuable black silicon, scientists from Rice University have developed a way to simplify the production of solar cells. The Rice lab of chemist Andrew Barron disclosed the research in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. Black silicon is […]

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May 14, 2015

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Physicists Build a Quantum-Gas Microscope for Fermionic Atoms

MIT Physicists Build a Quantum-Gas Microscope for Fermionic Atoms

A team of physicists has built a microscope that is able to freeze and image 1,000 individual fermionic atoms at once. Fermions are the building blocks of matter, interacting in a multitude of permutations to give rise to the elements of the periodic table. Without fermions, the physical world would not exist. Examples of fermions […]

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May 14, 2015

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Asteroid 1999 FN53 to Flyby Earth on Thursday

Asteroid 1999 FN53

Asteroid 1999 FN53 will safely flyby Earth on May 14 at a distance of no less than 6.3 million miles. An asteroid, designated 1999 FN53, will safely pass more than 26 times the distance of Earth to the moon on May 14. To put it another way, at its closest point, the asteroid will get […]

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May 13, 2015

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Larsen C Ice Shelf is Thinning from Above and Below

Antarctic Ice Shelf Thinning from Above and Below

Using satellite data and eight radar surveys captured during a 15-year period from 1998–2012, researchers reveal that the Larsen C Ice Shelf is thinning from above and below. A decade-long scientific debate about what’s causing the thinning of one of Antarctica’s largest ice shelves is settled this week (Wednesday 13 May) with the publication of […]

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May 13, 2015

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Kepler Finds Evidence of Daily Weather Cycles on Exoplanets

Kepler Finds Evidence of Weather Cycles on Exoplanets

Using Kepler data, researchers from the University of Toronto reveal evidence of daily weather cycles on six extra-solar planets. Toronto, Ontario – “Cloudy for the morning, turning to clear with scorching heat in the afternoon.” While this might describe a typical late-summer day in many places on Earth, it may also apply to planets outside […]

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May 13, 2015

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TEMPO Space-Based Pollution Monitoring Instrument Passes NASA Review

TEMPO Pollution Monitoring Instrument Passes Critical Review

A new space-based instrument that will monitor major air pollutants across North America on an hourly basis has successfully completed a critical review by NASA. Cambridge, Massachusetts – The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument passed a major milestone April 10, 2015 by successfully completing a critical NASA confirmation review. It has been confirmed […]

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May 13, 2015

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Study Shows Europa’s Mystery Dark Material Could Be Sea Salt

Europa's Mystery Material Could Be Sea Salt

New research from NASA reveals that the dark material coating some geological features of Jupiter’s moon Europa is likely sea salt from a subsurface ocean, discolored by exposure to radiation. The presence of sea salt on Europa’s surface suggests the ocean is interacting with its rocky seafloor — an important consideration in determining whether the […]

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May 13, 2015

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New Horizons Photographs Pluto’s Faintest Known Moons for the First Time

New Horizons Spots Pluto’s Faintest Known Moons

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has photographed Kerberos and Styx – the smallest and faintest of Pluto’s five known moons. It’s a complete Pluto family photo – or at least a photo of the family members we’ve already met. Following the spacecraft’s detection of Pluto’s giant moon Charon in July 2013, and Pluto’s smaller moons Hydra […]

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