Weather News

New NASA/NOAA Animations Reveal Water Vapor Over Oceans

June 25, 2014

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Scientists have used observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites to create two new types of animations that indicate where water vapor is moving over the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific oceans. Knowing where water vapor is in the atmosphere is one of many factors forecasters use to identify weather features. […]

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New ScienceCast Video Examines the Evidence That an El Niño is Developing

May 21, 2014

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A new four minute long ScienceCast video examines the evidence that an El Niño is developing in the Pacific. Every ten days, the NASA/French Space Agency Jason-2 satellite maps all the world’s oceans, monitoring changes in sea surface height, a measure of heat in the upper layers of the water. Because our planet is more […]

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AIM Monitors Electric-Blue Noctilucent Clouds over Antarctica

December 24, 2013

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New data from NASA’s AIM spacecraft show a vast bank of noctilucent clouds blanketing Antarctica. Data from NASA’s AIM spacecraft show that noctilucent clouds are like a great “geophysical light bulb.” They turn on every year in late spring, reaching almost full intensity over a period of no more than 5 to 10 days. News […]

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NASA Satellites View Super Typhoon Haiyan

November 11, 2013

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New satellite data from NASA provide a glimpse into one of the most powerful storms ever recorded on Earth, Super Typhoon Haiyan. New satellite images just obtained from NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua spacecraft and the Indian Space Research Organization’s OceanSAT-2 ocean wind scatterometer provide a glimpse into one of the […]

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Climate Models Predict 21st Century Temperature and Precipitation Changes

September 27, 2013

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This four minute video shows climate model estimates on how global temperature and precipitation patterns will change throughout the 21st century given current rising greenhouse gas levels. Models used by the IPCC estimate global temperature and precipitation patterns will change throughout the 21st century given current rising greenhouse gas levels. This video depicts a scenario […]

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ISS “Firestation” Experiment to Explore the Tops of Thunderstorms

September 11, 2013

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A new four minute ScienceCast video explores the strange phenomena coming from the tops of thunderstorms and details the new ISS experiment called “Firestation” that is set to explore the links between Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes, ordinary lightning, and sprites. We all know what comes out of the bottom of thunderstorms: bolts of lightning. Jagged columns […]

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Warmer Weather and Precipitation Increase the Risk of Violence

August 5, 2013

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A newly published study from Princeton University and UC Berkeley reveals that slight increases in temperature and precipitation result in increased human conflict. Should climate change trigger the upsurge in heat and rainfall that scientists predict, people may face a threat just as perilous and volatile as extreme weather — each other. Researchers from Princeton […]

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Weather on Uranus and Neptune Limited to a “Weather Layer”

May 16, 2013

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In a newly published study, researchers detail the atmospheric circulation patterns of Uranus and Neptune, finding that the streams of gas observed in the atmosphere are limited to a “weather layer” of no more than about 1000 km in depth. What is the long-range weather forecast for the giant planets Uranus and Neptune? These planets […]

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Amazon Area Twice the Size of California Still Suffering from the Effects of a Megadrought

January 18, 2013

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A new study from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory found that 700,000 square kilometers of forest in southwestern Amazonia is still suffering from a megadrought that began 2005. Pasadena, California – An area of the Amazon rainforest twice the size of California continues to suffer from the effects of a megadrought that began in 2005, finds […]

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The Inherent Unpredictability of El Nino Events

January 5, 2013

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El Niño events are not as predictable as previously thought. According to new analyses of climate records locked within ancient corals, the frequency and strength of the ocean-warming phenomenon were more variable during the last century than, on average, during the past 7,000 years. The scientists published their findings in the journal Science¹. The finding […]

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Atmospheric River Observatories Allow Accurate Weather Prediction of Floods

January 3, 2013

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Atmospheric rivers are long, narrow conveyor belts of rainstorms that stream in from the Pacific Ocean. Meteorologists have been able to predict the storms five days in advance, thanks to a new network of weather sensors recently installed in California. The network is only partially complete, and will be finished in 2014. It should allow […]

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Commercial Network of Microsatellites Aims to Help Weather Prediction

November 28, 2012

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cosmic-satellites

Most orbiting satellites point down towards Earth, but the satellites of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology look sideways. Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) look towards the curving horizon in order to track the dozens of satellites that are part of the Global Positioning System. By tracking their radio signals, COSMIC is providing atmospheric data that […]

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