Cassini Completes Dive Between Saturn and Its Rings, Back in Contact with Astronomers

NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft is back in contact with astronomers after completing its first-ever dive through the narrow gap between the planet Saturn and its rings. The spacecraft is in the process of beaming back science and engineering data collected during its passage, via NASA’s Deep Space Network Goldstone Complex in California’s Mojave Desert.

“In the grandest tradition of exploration, NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft has once again blazed a trail, showing us new wonders and demonstrating where our curiosity can take us if we dare,” said Jim Green, director of the Planetary Science Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

As it dove through the gap, Cassini came within about 1,900 miles (3,000 kilometers) of Saturn’s cloud tops (where the air pressure is 1 bar — comparable to the atmospheric pressure of Earth at sea level) and within about 200 miles (300 kilometers) of the innermost visible edge of the rings.

While mission managers were confident Cassini would pass through the gap successfully, they took extra precautions with this first dive, as the region had never been explored.

“No spacecraft has ever been this close to Saturn before. We could only rely on predictions, based on our experience with Saturn’s other rings, of what we thought this gap between the rings and Saturn would be like,” said Cassini Project Manager Earl Maize of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. “I am delighted to report that Cassini shot through the gap just as we planned and has come out the other side in excellent shape.”

The gap between the rings and the top of Saturn’s atmosphere is about 1,500 miles (2,000 kilometers) wide. The best models for the region suggested that if there were ring particles in the area where Cassini crossed the ring plane, they would be tiny, on the scale of smoke particles. The spacecraft zipped through this region at speeds of about 77,000 mph (124,000 kph) relative to the planet, so small particles hitting a sensitive area could potentially have disabled the spacecraft.

As a protective measure, the spacecraft used its large, dish-shaped high-gain antenna (13 feet or 4 meters across) as a shield, orienting it in the direction of oncoming ring particles. This meant that the spacecraft was out of contact with Earth during the ring-plane crossing, which took place at 2 a.m. PDT (5 a.m. EDT) on April 26. Cassini was programmed to collect science data while close to the planet and turn toward Earth to make contact about 20 hours after the crossing.

Cassini’s next dive through the gap is scheduled for May 2.


After the first-ever dive through the narrow gap between the planet Saturn and its rings, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft called home to mission control at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. See highlights from the scene at JPL on April 26-27, 2017, and some of the first raw images the spacecraft sent back from its closest-ever look at Saturn’s atmosphere. For more information about Cassini and its “Grand Finale,” visit https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/ .

Source: Preston Dyches, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

2 Comments on "Cassini Completes Dive Between Saturn and Its Rings, Back in Contact with Astronomers"

  1. Freaking the most amazing thing… why isn’t this the leading story in every news outlet in the world??? Not that there haven’t been other such freakin’ amazing similar things… but, are we all asleep? do people simply lack the knowledge to be able to appreciate this kind of amazing event?

  2. Farhad mokhberi | April 29, 2017 at 1:28 am | Reply

    I’ve got to say in general that your site is amazing,i love it. I’m very very very thankful.

Leave a comment

Email address is optional. If provided, your email will not be published or shared.