Nanotechnology News

Engineers Develop New System to Harness the Full Spectrum of Available Solar Radiation

September 29, 2014

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New System Aims to Harness the Full Spectrum of Available Solar Radiation

Engineers at MIT have developed a two-dimensional metallic dielectric photonic crystal that has the ability to absorb sunlight from a wide range of angles while withstanding extremely high temperatures. The key to creating a material that would be ideal for converting solar energy to heat is tuning the material’s spectrum of absorption just right: It […]

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New “Gold Nanocluster” Technology Improves Solar Cell Performance

September 26, 2014

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Scientists Addvance Solar Power with New Gold Nanocluster Technology

Using approximately 10,000 times less gold than in previous studies, researchers from Western University improve solar power performance with new “gold nanocluster” technology. Scientists at Western University have discovered that a small molecule created with just 144 atoms of gold can increase solar cell performance by more than 10 per cent. These findings, published recently […]

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Researchers Track Interactions Between Individual DNA Molecule Segments

September 25, 2014

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Single Unlabeled Biomolecules Detected Through Light

Using an optical microstructure and gold nanoparticles, researchers at the Max Planck Institute have amplified the interaction of light with DNA to the extent that they can now track interactions between individual DNA molecule segments. Being able to track individual biomolecules and observe them at work is every biochemist’s dream. This would enable the scientists […]

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Carbon Nanotube Patches Improve Heart Function

September 23, 2014

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Carbon Nanotubes Improve Electrical Signaling Between Immature Heart Cells

Using carbon nanotubes, researchers at Rice University and Texas Children’s Hospital have created heart-defect patches that improve electrical signaling between immature heart cells. Living heart cells called ventricular myocytes cultured in nanotube-infused hydrogel beat in an experiment by Rice University and Texas Children’s scientists, who are creating patches to repair pediatric heart defects. Courtesy of […]

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Phase-Change Materials Increase the Speed Limit for Computers

September 19, 2014

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Phase Change Materials Increase the Speed Limit for Computers

By replacing silicon with phase-change materials, new research shows that computers could be capable of processing information up to 1,000 times faster than currently models. The present size and speed limitations of computer processors and memory could be overcome by replacing silicon with ‘phase-change materials’ (PCMs), which are capable of reversibly switching between two structural […]

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New Graphene Sensor Detects Cancer Biomarkers

September 19, 2014

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New Sensor Tracks Down Cancer Biomarkers

Scientists from the University of Swansea have developed an ultrasensitive graphene biosensor that can detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer. The biosensor has been shown to be more than five times more sensitive than bioassay tests currently in use, and was able to provide results in a matter of minutes, opening […]

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Engineers Develop New Temperature Switchable Membrane to Regulate Flow

September 19, 2014

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Researchers Develop New Temperature Switchable Membrane

Researchers from the University of Connecticut and Yale University have developed a new membrane with highly aligned nanoscale pores that open and close in response to temperature; this highly porous, valve-like material has many potential filtration applications, including water purification and molecular separation. The membrane was created from a block copolymer that self-assembles into alternating […]

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Liquid Inks Create More Efficient and Cheaper Solar Cells

September 18, 2014

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Researchers Create Better Solar Cells with Liquid Inks

A team of scientists from the California NanoSystems Institute is using liquid inks to create better solar cells, improving efficiency and lowering costs. The basic function of solar cells is to harvest sunlight and turn it into electricity. Thus, it is critically important that the film that collects the light on the surface of the […]

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Graphene Nanoribbon Film Keeps Glass Ice-Free

September 18, 2014

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Scientists Create a De-Icing Film for Glass

Researchers from Rice University have developed a transparent graphene nanoribbon film that can be used to prevent ice and fog buildup on glass and plastic, as well as radar domes and antennas. Rice University scientists who created a de-icing film for radar domes have now refined the technology to work as a transparent coating for […]

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Programmable Biofilm-Based Materials That Self-Assemble

September 18, 2014

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Researchers Use Biofilms to Create Self-Healing Materials

A newly published study details how researchers at Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University are using biofilms to create self-healing materials and other technologies. For many people, biofilms conjure up images of slippery stones in streambeds or dirty drains. A team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University […]

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Scientists Develop First Water-Based Nuclear Battery

September 17, 2014

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First Water Based Nuclear Battery to Generate Electricity

Using a water-based solution, researchers at the University of Missouri have created a long-lasting and more efficient nuclear battery. Columbia, Missouri – From cell phones to cars and flashlights, batteries play an important role in everyday life. Scientists and technology companies constantly are seeking ways to improve battery life and efficiency. Now, for the first […]

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Copper Foam Provides a New Way to Turn CO2 into Useful Chemicals

September 16, 2014

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Copper Foam Could Provide a New Way of Converting Excess CO2 into Useful Industrial Chemicals

A team of researchers at Brown University’s Center for Capture and Conversion of CO2 have discovered that copper foam could provide a new way of converting excess CO2 into useful industrial chemicals, including formic acid. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — A catalyst made from a foamy form of copper has vastly different electrochemical properties […]

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