Neuroscience News

Media Multitaskers Have Lower Grey-Matter Density in the Brain

September 25, 2014

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Study Shows Multitasking May Change Brain Structure

New research from the University of Sussex shows that people who frequently use several media devices at the same time have lower grey-matter density in one particular region of the brain compared to those who use just one device occasionally. Simultaneously using mobile phones, laptops and other media devices could be changing the structure of […]

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Zebrafish Larva Eye Distinguishes Between Prey and Predator

September 18, 2014

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Eye of Zebrafish Larva Distinguishes Between Prey and Predator

A new study from the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research reveals how the eye of a zebrafish larva can already distinguish between prey and predator. Red or green? Small or large? Fast or slow? Humans and animals rely on their visual organs to classify objects in their environment. Decisions about how we best respond […]

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Brain Structure of the Parietal Cortex Could Predict Risky Behavior

September 10, 2014

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Brain Structure Could Predict Risky Behavior

New research shows that brain structure may predict risky behavior, revealing that those with a larger volume in a particular part of the parietal cortex were willing to take more risks than those with less volume in this part of the brain. Some people avoid risks at all costs, while others will put their wealth, […]

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Researchers Reveal a New Pathway to Help Treat Perinatal Brain Injuries

September 9, 2014

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A New Pathway to Help Treat Perinatal Brain Injuries

A team of researchers has uncovered a new pathway to help treat perinatal brain injuries, revealing that a synthetic molecule derived from the embryo called PreImplantation Factor (sPIF) protects against neuronal death and brain injury by targeting let-7. Researchers at Yale School of Medicine and their colleagues have uncovered a new pathway to help treat […]

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Chimpanzees Outplay Humans in Brain Games

September 3, 2014

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Chimps Outplay Humans in Brain Games

In a new study chimpanzees outplay humans in a two-player game, suggesting that chimps may have a superior memory and strategy when it comes to recalling their opponent’s choice history. We humans assume we are the smartest of all creations. In a world with over 8.7 million species, only we have the ability to understand […]

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Neuroscientists Reverse Emotional Association of Specific Memories

August 28, 2014

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Neuroscientists Reverse Emotional Association of Memories

Neuroscientists from MIT have identified the brain circuit that controls how memories become linked with positive or negative emotions, revealing that they could reverse the emotional association of specific memories by manipulating brain cells with optogenetics. Most memories have some kind of emotion associated with them: Recalling the week you just spent at the beach […]

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Neuroscientists Improve Touch Sensitivity in Mice

August 27, 2014

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Neuroscientists Improve Touch Sensitivity in Mice

Neuroscientists from Brown University show that faint sensations can be made more vivid by triggering a brain rhythm that appears to shift sensory attention in mice. This newly published study provides the first direct evidence that the brain’s “gamma” rhythms have a causal role in processing the sense of touch. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) […]

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A New Treatment Approach for Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

August 26, 2014

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Potential Therapy for Charcot Marie Tooth Disease

A team of scientists from the Department of Neurogenetics at the Max Planck Institute and University Medical Center Göttingen has discovered a new treatment approach for the hereditary neurological disorder Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is the most common inherited disease affecting the peripheral nervous system. Researchers from the Department of Neurogenetics […]

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Area of Brain Responsible for Exercise Motivation Discovered, May Help Improve Treatments for Depression

August 25, 2014

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Researchers Discover Area of Brain Responsible for Exercise Motivation

Scientists at Seattle Children’s Research Institute have discovered that the dorsal medial habenula region in the brain controls the desire to exercise in mice, possibly helping researchers develop more targeted and effective treatments for depression. Scientists at Seattle Children’s Research Institute have discovered an area of the brain that could control a person’s motivation to […]

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Psychology and Public Health Experts Claim Regular Marijuana Use Bad for Teens’ Brains

August 11, 2014

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Researchers Show Regular Marijuana Use Bad for Teens Brains

Psychology and public health experts claim that that regular cannabis use, which they consider once a week, is not safe and may result in addiction and significant neurocognitive damage to the brains of teenagers and young adults. Washington — Frequent marijuana use can have a significant negative effect on the brains of teenagers and young […]

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Magnetic Stimulation Shifts Abnormal Neural Connections Towards Their Correct Locations

August 7, 2014

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Reprogramming Your Brain to Work Better

A newly published study demonstrated that weak sequential electromagnetic pulses on mice can shift abnormal neural connections towards their correct locations in the brain. Researchers from The University of Western Australia have shown that electromagnetic stimulation can alter brain organisation which may make your brain work better. In results from a study published today in […]

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Researchers Find Clues to Preventing Weight Gain

August 5, 2014

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Researchers Find Clues to Preventing Weight Gain

A new study from Yale University shows that when the researchers blocked the effects of the nuclear receptor PPARgamma in a small number of brain cells in mice, the animals ate less and became resistant to a high-fat diet. Preventing weight gain, obesity, and ultimately diabetes could be as simple as keeping a nuclear receptor […]

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