Neuroscience News

New Technique Enlarges Tissue Samples, Making Them Easier to Image

January 16, 2015

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New Technique Enables Nanoscale-Resolution Microscopy

By physically enlarging the specimen itself, researchers from MIT have invented a new way to visualize the nanoscale structure of the brain and other tissues. Beginning with the invention of the first microscope in the late 1500s, scientists have been trying to peer into preserved cells and tissues with ever-greater magnification. The latest generation of […]

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Duke Study Provides Close-Up of Synapse Refinement

January 12, 2015

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Study Pinpoints Autism-Linked Protein for Sculpting Brain Connections

A new study from Duke University provides a close-up of synapse refinement and identifies that the protein hevin is crucial in this process. Durham, North Carolina – Shortly after birth, human brains expand rapidly with the experience of an entirely new world. During this period, neurons in the newborn brain compete with one another to […]

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Onset of Schizophrenia Linked to Elevated Neural Links

January 7, 2015

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Schizophrenia Onset Linked to Elevated Neural Links

New research from Yale scientists, in conjunction with colleagues at the Huaxi Magnetic Resonance Research Center at Sichuan University in China, reveals that that the onset of the schizophrenia is marked by an abnormal spike in neural connections. In its chronic stage, schizophrenia is typically marked by a dearth of links between brain cells in […]

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New Research Identifies Enzyme Crucial to the Shaping and Division of Brain Cells

January 5, 2015

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Study Identifies Enzyme Crucial to the Shaping and Division of Brain Cells

A newly published study identifies a “cutting” enzyme crucial to the shaping and division of brain cells as well as the replenishment of neural stem cells. The study, appearing online December 17 in the journal Neuron, helps explain the molecular basis of complex brain abnormalities, including small brain size (microcephaly) observed in children who were […]

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Study Shows Digital Books Can Adversely Impact Overall Health

December 31, 2014

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E-Readers Foil Good Night’s Sleep

A newly published study from Harvard Medical School reveals that using light-emitting electronic devices before bedtime can adversely impact overall health. Use of a light-emitting electronic book (LE-eBook) in the hours before bedtime can adversely impact overall health, alertness and the circadian clock, which synchronizes the daily rhythm of sleep to external environmental time cues, […]

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New Non-Invasive MRI Technology Detects Alzheimer’s Disease Early

December 23, 2014

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New Non-Invasive Method Can Detect Alzheimer’s Disease Early

A newly published study details how a new MRI probe that pairs a magnetic nanostructure with an antibody can detect Alzheimer’s disease early. Evanston, Illinois — No methods currently exist for the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease, which affects one out of nine people over the age of 65. Now, an interdisciplinary team of Northwestern […]

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New Computer Neural Networks Identify As Well As The Primate Brain

December 19, 2014

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New Computer Neural Networks Can Visually Identify as Well as the Primate Brain

A new study from MIT neuroscientists shows that the newest computer neural networks can identify visual objects as well as the primate brain. For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual skills such as recognizing objects, which the human brain does very accurately and quickly. Until now, no computer […]

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Neuroscientists Reveal Fundamental Discovery about Cortical Neurons

December 11, 2014

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Neuroscientists Reveal Fundamental Discovery about Cortical Neurons

Neuroscientists from the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory uncover a fundamental discovery about cortical neurons, showing that inhibitory neuron functionality is not an immutable property of cortical cells, but a consequence of more complex network dynamics. The two major types of neuron in the brain’s cerebral cortex are connected by intricate cortical circuits that […]

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Brain’s Response to Smoking is Different in Men and Women

December 10, 2014

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Men and Women Respond Differently to Cigarettes

New research from Yale University shows that men and women respond to cigarettes differently, demonstrating for the first time that smoking-induced dopamine activation occurs in a different brain region and much faster in nicotine-dependent men than women. Yale researchers using a new brain imaging analysis method have confirmed that smoking cigarettes activates a dopamine-driven pleasure […]

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Proper Copper Levels Essential to Spontaneous Neural Activity

December 2, 2014

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Proper Copper Levels Essential to Spontaneous Neural Activity

A new study from the Berkeley Lab reveals that proper copper levels are essential to the health of a brain at rest and suggests that mismanagement of copper in the brain linked to Alzheimer’s and other neurological disorders can also contribute to misregulation of signaling in cell−to-cell communications. In recent years it has been established […]

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New Study Shows Brain stimulation Counteracts Dangerous Side Effect of Seizures

December 2, 2014

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Brain Stimulation Can Restore Consciousness after a Seizure

In a newly published study, neurologists from Yale University have reawakened rats after seizures by stimulating parts of the brain involved in conscious awareness. The research may lead to treatments for individuals with epilepsy. Loss of consciousness is a common and dangerous side effect of epileptic seizures. A study published this week in the journal […]

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White Matter Changes Allow Older People to Learn New Visual Tasks

November 21, 2014

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White Matter Changes Allow Older Brains to Learn

New research from Brown University shows that older people can learn a visual task just as well as younger ones, revealing that a significant change in the white matter of the brain takes place when the older subjects learn. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — A widely presumed problem of aging is that the brain […]

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Study Shows Calorie-Restricting Diets Slow Aging

November 18, 2014

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Calorie-Restricting Diets Slow Aging

Neuroscientists show that calorie-reduced diets stop the normal rise and fall in activity levels of close to 900 different genes linked to aging and memory formation in mice. The adage ‘you are what you eat’ has been around for years. Now, important new research provides another reason to be careful with your calories. In a […]

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Decoy Drug Allows Brains of Adult Mice to Form New Synapses

October 29, 2014

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Decoy Drug Allows Brain to Form New Connections

New research from Stanford Bio-X scientists shows that the brains of adult mice are able to form new synapses by disabling the function of a single protein for as little as a week. This research has the potential to help adults recover from stroke and forms of blindness or to prevent the loss of connections […]

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Targeted Chemotherapy Delivery Could Kill Tumor Cells More Effectively

October 28, 2014

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New Approach Could Kill Tumor Cells in the Brain More Effectively

New research shows that delivering chemotherapy directly into the brain cavity may kill tumor cells in the brain more effectively and avoid side effects. Every year, about 100,000 Americans are diagnosed with brain tumors that have spread from elsewhere in the body. These tumors, known as metastases, are usually treated with surgery followed by chemotherapy, […]

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Dietary Cocoa Flavanols Reverse Age-Related Memory Decline in Older Adults

October 27, 2014

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Dietary Cocoa Flavanols Reverse Age-Related Memory Decline in Healthy Older Adults

A new study from Columbia University Medical Center shows that dietary cocoa flavanols reverse age-related memory decline in healthy older adults. New York, New York — Dietary cocoa flavanols—naturally occurring bioactives found in cocoa—reversed age-related memory decline in healthy older adults, according to a study led by Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) scientists. The study, […]

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Previously Unknown Mechanism Repairs Brain after Stroke

October 10, 2014

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Researchers Discover Mechanism that Repairs Brain after Stroke

Working with mice, researchers from Lund University and the Karolinska Institute have discovered a previously unknown mechanism through which the brain produces new nerve cells after a stroke. The findings have been published in the journal Science. A stroke is caused by a blood clot blocking a blood vessel in the brain, which leads to […]

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