Neuroscience News

Study Reveals Age-Related Cognitive-Motor Decline after Age 24

April 15, 2014

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A new study from Simon Fraser University reveals that cognitive motor performance starts to decline in individuals after age 24. It’s a hard pill to swallow, but if you’re over 24 years of age you’ve already reached your peak in terms of your cognitive motor performance, according to a new Simon Fraser University study. SFU’s […]

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Neurobiologists Block the Effects of Stress

April 14, 2014

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By deleting the REDD1 gene in mice, researchers from Yale University were able to block the synaptic and behavioral deficits caused by stress. Ketamine, an anesthetic sometimes abused as a street drug, increases the synaptic connections between brain cells and in low doses acts as a powerful antidepressant, Yale researchers have found. However, stress has […]

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Researchers Use Brain Signals to Move Paralyzed Limbs

February 20, 2014

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A newly published study details a cortical-spinal prosthesis that directs “targeted movement” in paralyzed limbs. Ithaca, New York – To help people suffering paralysis from injury, stroke or disease, scientists have invented brain-machine interfaces that record electrical signals of neurons in the brain and translate them to movement. Usually, that means the neural signals direct […]

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Gene Linking Brain Structure to Intelligence Identified

February 12, 2014

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An international team of scientists has identified a gene linking brain structure to intelligence, finding that teenagers carrying a particular gene variant had a thinner cortex in the left cerebral hemisphere and performed less well on tests for intellectual ability. For the first time, scientists at King’s College London have identified a gene linking the […]

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Researchers Discover New Link between Processes Associated with a Parkinson’s Related Gene Defect

January 30, 2014

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Researchers from the Max Planck Institute have discovered a new link between processes associated with a Parkinson’s-related gene defect, paving the way to the development of more refined GDNF therapies in the future. Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease involve the death of thousands of neurons in the brain. Nerve growth factors produced by the body, […]

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How the Anatomical Structure of the Brain Impacts Its Functioning

January 16, 2014

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By simultaneously analyzing 1.6 billion connections within the brain, researchers have discovered how the architecture of the brain shapes its functioning. The structure of the human brain is complex, reminiscent of a circuit diagram with countless connections. But what role does this architecture play in the functioning of the brain? To answer this question, researchers […]

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Study Shows Caffeine Has a Positive Effect on Memory

January 14, 2014

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A newly published study from John Hopkins University shows that caffeine has a positive effect of memory, enhancing certain memories at least up to 24 hours after it is consumed. Whether it’s a mug full of fresh-brewed coffee, a cup of hot tea, or a can of soda, consuming caffeine is the energy boost of […]

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Study Shows Human Brain Development is Divided into Three Major Phases

December 27, 2013

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In a newly published study, researchers analyzed gene expression in human and macaque monkey neocortex, finding that human neocortical development is divided into three major phases. The human brain develops with an exquisitely timed choreography marked by distinct patterns of gene activity at different stages from the womb to adulthood, Yale researchers report in the […]

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Study Shows Oxytocin Improves Brain Function in Children with Autism

December 3, 2013

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A new study from Yale University is the first study to evaluate the impact of oxytocin on brain function in children with autism spectrum disorders, finding that a single spray of oxytocin improves brain function in children with autism. A single dose of the hormone oxytocin, delivered via nasal spray, has been shown to enhance […]

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Neuroscientists Discover that Dendritic Spikes Enhance the Brain’s Computing Power

October 28, 2013

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New research from UNC Health Care and UNC School of Medicine shows that dendrites actively process information, multiplying the brain’s computing power. Chapel Hill, North Carolina – Dendrites, the branch-like projections of neurons, were once thought to be passive wiring in the brain. But now researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill […]

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Scientists Discover the Earliest Known Complete Nervous System

October 17, 2013

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Scientists have discovered the earliest known complete nervous system preserved in the fossilized remains of a 520 million year old arthropod. A team of researchers led by University of Arizona Regents’ Professor Nick Strausfeld and London Natural History Museum’s Greg Edgecombe have discovered the earliest known complete nervous system, exquisitely preserved in the fossilized remains […]

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New Method of Measuring Brain Activity Could Lead to “Mind-Reading” Devices

October 16, 2013

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Scientists from the Stanford School of Medicine have developed a new method of recording brain activity that could lead to “mind-reading” applications that would allow a patient who is rendered mute by a stroke to communicate via passive thinking. A brain region activated when people are asked to perform mathematical calculations in an experimental setting […]

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