Yale University News

CCNE1 Gene Turns Back Cellular Clock

May 22, 2015

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Researchers Discover Human-Specific Gene That Turns Back Cellular Clock

Yale researchers have discovered a gene that turns back the cellular clock, greatly aiding the reprogramming of mature cells. An exhaustive analysis of factors that allow mature cells to become like embryonic stem cells again has revealed a spliced form of a gene found only in primates that greatly aids the reprogramming of mature cells. […]

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Yale Researchers Illuminate Major Evolutionary Patterns of Snakes

May 20, 2015

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Researchers Generate a Family Tree for Living and Extinct Snakes

A team of researchers from Yale University analyzed snake genomes, modern snake anatomy, and information from the fossil record, generating a family tree for living and extinct snakes and illuminating major evolutionary patterns that have played out across snake evolutionary history. The ancestral snakes in the grass actually lived in the forest, according to the […]

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Brain Activity Predicts Weight Gain

May 20, 2015

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New Study Shows How the Brain Responds to Food Cues

A new study set to appear in The Journal Neuroscience illustrates that it is the way the brain responds to food cues when individuals are not hungry that predicts weight gain and that the reasons why people gain weight can be fundamentally different. The way the brain responds while sipping a delicious milkshake can predict […]

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Drug-Resistant EGFR May Have “Achilles Heel”

May 19, 2015

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Two Experimental Drugs Show Promise Against Drug-Resistant EGFR

Researchers from Yale University have discovered a key structural difference in the drug-resistant form of EGFR that could lead to new strategies to combat the disease. Drugs introduced more than a decade ago that target mutations in a protein known as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) held the promise of personalized treatments for a […]

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New Chemical Catalysts Are Less Expensive and More Sustainable

May 18, 2015

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New Chemical Catalysts

Researchers from Yale University have developed a new family of chemical catalysts that are expected to lower the cost and boost the sustainability of the production of chemical compounds used by a number of industries. The new catalysts are based on palladium, a rare and expensive metal. Palladium catalysts are used to form an array […]

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A Promising New Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

May 15, 2015

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Researchers Solve Multiple Sclerosis Puzzle

New research shows that auto-reactive T cells in MS patients produce different types of inflammatory hormones called cytokines than they do in healthy subjects, opening the door to new treatments for the disease. Evidence has long suggested multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease, but researchers have been puzzled because they found the same T […]

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New Mathematical Model Helps Predicts Optimal Use of Antibiotics

May 15, 2015

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Mathematical Model Predicts Optimal Use of Antibiotics

Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have developed a new mathematical model to help predict the optimal dosing of antibiotics. Although antibiotics were first introduced more than 70 years ago, substantial uncertainty remains about how the drugs should be used by patients to ensure recovery, while minimizing toxic side effects and the risk […]

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Gene Expression Evolves Best Under a House-of-Cards Model

May 15, 2015

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Gene Expression Evolves Under a House-of-Cards Model

Using sophisticated modeling of genomic data from diverse species, scientists from Yale University have answered a longstanding question about which competing model of evolution works best. Their research suggests that the “house of cards” model — which holds that mutations with large effects effectively reshuffle the genomic deck — explains evolutionary processes better than the […]

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Scientists Replicate the Molecular Processes That Led from Dinosaur Snouts to Bird Beaks

May 12, 2015

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Researchers Retrace the Bird’s Beak to Its Dinosaur Origins

Researchers have conducted the first successful reversion of a bird’s skull features, replicating ancestral molecular development to transform chicken embryos in a laboratory into specimens with a snout and palate configuration similar to that of small dinosaurs. Scientists have successfully replicated the molecular processes that led from dinosaur snouts to the first bird beaks. Using […]

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Yale Research Shows How Renalase Protects Kidney and Heart from Injury

May 11, 2015

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Study Details How Key Protein Protects Kidney and Heart from Injury

A newly published study from Yale University details how the protein renalase protects cells from the type of severe injury that could result in a heart attack or kidney failure. The finding may lead to new treatments that protect against those conditions. Dr. Gary V. Desir, professor of medicine, and fellow researchers at Yale School […]

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Vitamin A Receptor Helps Protect Lungs from Smoke Exposure and Viral Infections

May 8, 2015

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Vitamin A Receptor Protects Lungs from Smoking

New research shows that vitamin A that plays a key role in lung development and maintenance, and may play a protective role in lung injury caused by cigarette smoke exposure and viral infections. It’s no surprise that smoking is bad for the lungs. But only 10%-20% of long-term smokers will develop serious conditions that affect […]

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New Yale Video: Memory T Cells and Long-Term Immunity

May 7, 2015

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How Immune Cells Remember

This short video details why memory T cells are critical for long-term immunity. Yale associate professor of immunology Susan Kaech describes new mechanisms that underlie long-term immunity, which is essential for human health and vaccines. Her research was published May 7 in the journal Cell. Video produced by Kindealabs. Publication: Guoliang Cui, et al., “IL-7-Induced […]

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Astronomers Discover the Farthest Galaxy to Date

May 6, 2015

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Hubble Discovers Distant Luminous Galaxy

An international team of astronomers has pushed back the cosmic frontier of galaxy exploration to a time when the universe was only 5% of its present age, revealing a galaxy that existed over 13 billion years ago. The team discovered an exceptionally luminous galaxy more than 13 billion years in the past and determined its […]

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New Pathway for Passing Genetic Messages between Cells

May 4, 2015

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New Pathway for Passing Genetic Messages between Cells Discovered

New research from Yale University reveals a new pathway for passing genetic messages between cells. A Yale-led research team has described a novel pathway for the delivery of microRNA (miRNA), the tiny RNA molecules that can move between cells to regulate gene expression. The study was published on April 29 by PLOS ONE. Scientists previously […]

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TH17 Cells Convert from Pro-Inflammatory to Anti-Inflammatory

April 30, 2015

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Possible Therapeutic Strategy for Inflammation-Mediated Diseases

New research shows that TH17 cells can convert from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory, revealing a possible therapeutic strategy for inflammation-mediated diseases. A type of immune cell that promotes inflammation during the immune response, TH17, can convert into another type of cell that reduces inflammation, Yale researchers have found. The finding, published April 29 in Nature, points […]

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Nanoparticles Deliver PNA Molecules to Correct Mutation in Cystic Fibrosis

April 28, 2015

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Scientists Correct Mutation in Cystic Fibrosis

New research details how a team of scientists delivered peptide nucleic acids and donor DNA via microscopic nanoparticles to successfully corrected the most common mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is an inherited, life-threatening disorder that damages the lungs and digestive system. It is most commonly caused by a mutation in […]

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Fewer Doses of Prophylaxis Provides Near-Optimal Protection Against RSV

April 23, 2015

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Fewer Doses of Prophylaxis Provides Near-Optimal Protection

Researchers from Yale and the National Institutes of Health and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality reveal that fewer doses of the antibody for Respiratory Syncytial Virus can be given to children and still offer near-optimal protection. Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in U.S. children […]

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