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Biologists Identify a New Approach to Cancer Immunotherapy

August 27, 2015

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A New Approach to Cancer Immunotherapy

Scientists from Yale University have identified a new way to boost immune response by metabolically “rewiring” immune cells. Inside a tumor, immune cells and cancer cells battle for survival. The advantage may go to the cells that metabolize the most glucose, say Yale researchers who have identified a new way to boost immune response by […]

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Scientists Develop New Technique To Improve Kidney Research

August 25, 2015

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Scientists Develop New Technique for Kidney Research

Scientists at Yale School of Medicine have developed a new 3D-imaging technique to better understand and to help treat kidney disease. One in four patients treated with the widely used anti-cancer drug cisplatin develop chronic kidney disease. To better understand how the treatment leads to kidney damage, and possibly prevent it, a team of researchers […]

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Calprotectin Plays a Key Role in Blocking Pathogen Survival

August 24, 2015

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Calprotectin Fends off Microbial Invaders

New research from MIT reveals the process by which human calprotectin prevents invading pathogens from obtaining iron. Invading microbial pathogens must scavenge essential nutrients from their host organism in order to survive and replicate. To defend themselves from infection, hosts attempt to block pathogens’ access to these nutrients. Now researchers at MIT have discovered the […]

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Researchers Reveal That Cost Considerations Are Wired Into The Learning of Habits

August 21, 2015

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Researchers Discover Neurons That Drive Habits

A newly published study from MIT shows that habit formation in primates is driven by neurons that represent the cost of a habit, as well as the reward. We are creatures of habit, nearly mindlessly executing routine after routine. Some habits we feel good about; others, less so. Habits are, after all, thought to be […]

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Researchers Discover Pathway That Controls Metabolism

August 20, 2015

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Researchers Discover a Switch That Controls Metabolism

By analyzing the cellular circuitry underlying the strongest genetic association with obesity, a team of researchers from MIT and Harvard Medical School have unveiled a new pathway that controls human metabolism by prompting our adipocytes, or fat cells, to store fat or burn it away. Obesity is one of the biggest public health challenges of […]

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Recent Discoveries Change How We Think about Dinosaurs

August 19, 2015

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Triceratops Had a Relative Named Hellboy

Five recent discoveries has re-shaped how scientists and the general public view dinosaurs. Dinosaurs are cool. That’s not up for debate. But, even though the ancient lizards have been extinct for 65 million years, there’s still plenty of exciting, new research challenging the things we think we know about dinosaurs. Over the past few years […]

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Biologists Recreate the Evolutionary Lineage of Adeno-Associated Viruses

August 19, 2015

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Researchers Recreate the Evolutionary Lineage of Adeno-Associated Viruses

A team of researchers from Harvard Medical School has recreated the evolutionary lineage of adeno-associated viruses, allowing them to better understand the intricate structure of viruses and how different properties arose throughout evolution. Harvard Medical School researchers have recreated the evolutionary lineage of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) to reconstruct an ancient viral particle that is highly […]

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How Birds Got Their Beaks

August 19, 2015

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A Closer Look at How Birds Got Their Beaks

In a new study evolutionary biologists reveal that bird beaks are the result of skeletal changes controlled by two genetic pathways, shedding light on the origins of one of nature’s most efficient tools. Birds are among the most successful creatures on the planet, with more than 10,000 species living across the globe, occupying a dizzying […]

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Newly Developed Simple Protein Plays Active Role in Cellular Function

August 11, 2015

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Yale Scientists Develope Simple New Proteins

Scientists from Yale University have created a synthetic protein that is active, despite its simplicity. Yale scientists have developed simple new proteins almost devoid of chemical diversity that still play a surprisingly active and specific role in cellular function, causing cells to act like cancer cells, they report August 10 in the Proceedings of the […]

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P2Y2 Receptor Helps Control Blood Pressure

August 4, 2015

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Researchers Discover New Receptor for Controlling Blood Pressure

New research from the Max Planck Institute shows that the P2Y2 receptor in blood vessel cells is a key element in the chain of blood pressure regulation. High blood pressure is a primary risk factor in the development of many cardiovascular diseases. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad […]

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Feeding Behavior in Worms May Help Shed Light on Human Heart Function

August 1, 2015

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Feeding Behavior in Worms Could Shed Light on Human Heart Function

In a new study from MIT researchers reveal that a simple roundworm has the ability to spit out potentially deadly substances — a finding that could have surprising implications for human heart research. Tasting and spitting out toxic food is a survival trait shared by many complex organisms. To feed, the worm uses its pharynx, […]

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Yale Study Shows T Cell Lymphoma Caused by Gene Deletions

July 21, 2015

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Study Shows T Cell Lymphoma Caused by Unusually Large Number of Gene Deletions

A newly published study from Yale University shows that a deadly form of T cell lymphoma is caused by an unusually large number of gene deletions, making it distinct among cancers. Researchers conducted a genomic analysis of normal and cancer cells from patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, a cancer of T-cells of the immune system […]

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New Stem Cell Study May Lead to New Drug Targets for Autism Treatment

July 17, 2015

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New Stem Cell Study Could Help Predict ASD

Using stem cells generated from skin biopsies of four patients with ASD, researchers from Yale University grew the stem cells into three-dimensional simulated miniature human brains to compare gene expression between the patients and their family members. A larger head size — or macrocephaly — is seen in many children with severe autism spectrum disorder […]

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How Scent and Nectar Influence Pollinators and Herbivores

July 13, 2015

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Flowers Use Scent and Nectar to Manipulate Pollinators

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology reveal how flowers use scent and nectar to manipulate pollinators and herbivores. Some pollinators not only provide fertilization services for flowering plants, they also lay their eggs on the plants’ leaves after they have visited the flowers. Voracious caterpillars hatch from these eggs and their enormous […]

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New Technique Uses Regenerative Capacity of Stem Cells to Eliminate HIV

July 6, 2015

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Stem Cell Gene Therapy Holds Promise for Eliminating HIV

Scientists at UCLA have developed a new technique that harnesses the regenerative capacity of stem cells to generate an immune response to HIV, showing that the technique decreased HIV levels in mice by 80 to 95 percent. Scientists at the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research are one […]

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Cancer Drug Prolongs the Life of Fruit Flies, Could Do the Same for Humans

June 30, 2015

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Cancer Drug Prolongs Life

Using a cancer drug called Trametinib, biologists have extended the life expectancy in fruit flies by around twelve percent. The researchers believe that the substance could be used to develop future anti-aging drugs to extend life expectancy in humans. Humans, yeasts and fruit flies began to evolve separately millions of years ago. Nevertheless, the cellular […]

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Study Shows Muscle Contraction May Contribute to Stroke Damage

June 29, 2015

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New Research Shows Muscle Contraction May Contribute to Stroke Damage

The precise regulation of cerebral blood flow is critical for normal brain function, and its disruption underlies many neuropathologies. Using optical imaging, researchers from Yale University found that capillary pericytes in mice and humans do not express smooth muscle actin and are morphologically and functionally distinct from adjacent precapillary smooth muscle cells (SMCs). An investigation […]

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Researchers Create Engineered Particles that Kill Harmful Bacteria

June 25, 2015

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In this illustration, phagemid plasmids infect a targeted bacteria.

Deadly to targeted bacteria, engineered particles known as phagemids have been created to fight bacterial infections with great effectiveness while eliminating harmful side effects of more traditional treatments. The global rise in antibiotic resistance is a growing threat to public health, damaging our ability to fight deadly infections such as tuberculosis. What’s more, efforts to […]

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