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New Yale Studies Explore the Science of Cardiovascular Diseases

September 26, 2016

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Cardiologists Explore the Science of Cardiovascular Diseases

Yale University scientists detail how basic science research insights are key to future breakthroughs in cardiovascular disease. Professor of cardiology Martin A. Schwartz led two recently published studies that advance knowledge of the underlying biology of cardiovascular diseases, which are among the most common causes of chronic illness and death worldwide. The first study, published […]

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Genomic Regions That Set Humans Apart From Other Primates Carry Many Autism-Linked Mutations

September 22, 2016

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Autism and Evolution

New research from Harvard Medical School suggests that mutations in genetic regulatory elements may be important in both autism spectrum disorder and human evolution. Small regions of the genome where humans have diverged from chimpanzees contain a variety of mutations implicated in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, report Harvard Medical School researchers at Boston Children’s […]

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MIT Biologists Reveal How lncRNA Helps to Control Cell Fate

September 12, 2016

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Biologists Discover How RNA Helps Control Cell Fate

New research details how biologists from MIT deciphered the structure of one type of long noncoding RNA and used that information to figure out how it interacts with a cellular protein to control the development of heart muscle cells. Several years ago, biologists discovered a new type of genetic material known as long noncoding RNA. […]

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UCSD Researchers Use Adenosine to Command Stem Cells to Build New Bone

September 1, 2016

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Researchers Command Stem Cells to Build New Bone

A team of scientists from UC San Diego have discovered an easy and efficient way to coax human pluripotent stem cells to regenerate bone tissue — by feeding them adenosine, a naturally occurring molecule in the body. The stem-cell-derived bone tissue helped repair cranial bone defects in mice without developing tumors or causing infection. The […]

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Yale Scientists Discover a New Therapy for a Chronic Brain Disease

August 23, 2016

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Yale Biologists Uncover Marker for a Chronic Brain Disease

Yale scientists have discovered a new and effective therapy for cerebral cavernous malformations. A team of researchers led by Yale professor of pathology Wang Min have pinpointed a marker that contributes to a chronic condition affecting the brain. Known as cerebral cavernous malformations, the condition is characterized by a tangle of capillaries in the brain’s […]

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MIT Biological Engineers Program Human Cells to Store Complex Histories in Their DNA

August 22, 2016

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Recording Analog Memories in Human Cells

Newly published research details how biological engineers from MIT developed a way to record complex histories in the DNA of human cells, allowing them to retrieve “memories” of past events by sequencing the DNA. This analog memory storage system — the first that can record the duration and/or intensity of events in human cells — […]

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Scientists Show How Synapses Are Arranged with Respect to Each Other

July 19, 2016

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How Synapses Are Arranged with Respect to Each Other

For the first time, neurobiologists show that contact points between specific neuron types are clustered in groups on the target neuron. The cerebral cortex resembles a vast switchboard. Countless lines carrying information about the environment, for example from the sensory organs, converge in the cerebral cortex. In order to direct the flow of data into […]

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Yale Scientists Recode Organisms to Resist Viral Contamination

July 18, 2016

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Scientists Recode Organisms to Resist Viral Contamination

Scientists from Yale University have discovered a novel way to combat viral contamination of bio-factories that produce a growing number of drugs, chemicals, and fuels. The new method involves recoding organisms to stop horizontal transfer of genes — which viruses use to infect and hijack cellular machinery to reproduce. The study is published in the […]

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New Study Improves Our Understanding of Intercellular Communication

July 6, 2016

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Biologists Improve Our Understanding of Intercellular Communication

New research reveals how cells can pack and release active ephrins and Eph receptors through extracellular vesicles, improving our understanding of intercellular communication and paving the way for new therapeutic strategies. Eph receptors and their partner proteins, the ephrins, are vital for intercellular communication. In the developing brain, they guide young neurons to the right […]

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Bird Brains Have Significantly More Neurons Than Primate Brains Of The Same Mass

June 14, 2016

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Birds Have Primate-Like Numbers of Neurons in the Forebrain

A new study systematically measures the number of neurons in the brains of birds, revealing that they have significantly more neurons packed into their small brains than are stuffed into mammalian and even primate brains of the same mass. The macaw has a brain the size of an unshelled walnut, while the macaque monkey has […]

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Researchers Identify the Molecular Pathways Involved in the Aging of Human Eggs

June 8, 2016

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Yale Researchers Identify the Molecular Pathways Involved in the Aging of Human Eggs

Researchers from the Yale School of Medicine have identified the molecular pathways involved in the aging of human eggs; which could eventually lead to treatments to correct age-related damage and improve fertility in women age 40 and older. Published in the June 6 issue of the journal Molecular Human Reproduction, the study examined the sharp […]

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New Research Shows Neanderthals Were Born with Wide Bodies and Robust Bones

May 25, 2016

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New Study Shows Neanderthals Were Stocky from Birth

Scientists investigated whether the differences in physique between Neanderthals and modern humans are genetic or caused by differences in lifestyle, finding that Neanderthals’ wide bodies and robust bones were formed by birth. If a Neanderthal were to sit down next to us on the underground, we would probably first notice his receding forehead, prominent brow […]

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New Approach Identifies Genetic Markers Linked to Complex Diseases

May 10, 2016

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Study Identifies New Gene Variants for Treating Arrhythmia

Researchers from MIT have developed a new approach that identifies genetic markers linked to complex diseases. Many diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and schizophrenia, tend to be passed down through families. After researchers sequenced the human genome about 15 years ago, they had high hopes that this trove of information would reveal the genes that […]

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New Study Details How Bacteria Become Individualists

May 9, 2016

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Bacteria Cells Respond Differently to Lack of Nutrients

No two bacteria are identical – even when they are genetically the same. New research reveals the conditions under which bacteria become individualists and how they help their group grow when times get tough. Whether you are a human or a bacterium, your environment determines how you can develop. In particular, there are two fundamental […]

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Researchers Discover 305 Million-Year-Old “Early Spider” Fossil

March 31, 2016

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305 Million-Year-Old Early Spider Fossil

A team of scientists has discovered the fossil of a 305 million-year-old arachnid, revealing more about the early origins of modern-day spiders. The new species, named Idmonarachne brasieri in honor of Professor Martin Brasier, University of Oxford, who passed away in December 2014, was found in Montceau-les-Mines, France, and researchers from The University of Manchester, […]

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New Findings Provide a Design for an HIV Vaccine Germline-Targeting Immunogen

March 28, 2016

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Scientists Announce New Anti-HIV Agent

A team of researchers has found HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells that are present in most people, and has described the design of an HIV vaccine germline-targeting immunogen capable of binding those B cells. Some people infected with HIV naturally produce antibodies that effectively neutralize many strains of the rapidly mutating virus, and […]

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Yale Biologists Solve the Mystery of the Tully Monster

March 21, 2016

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Mystery of the Tully Monster Solved

A newly published study from Yale University reveals that the Tully Monster had gills and a notochord, which functioned as a rudimentary spinal cord. The Tully Monster, an oddly configured sea creature with teeth at the end of a narrow, trunk-like extension of its head and eyes that perch on either side of a long, […]

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New Stem Cell Innovation Could Someday Help Treat Parkinson’s

March 17, 2016

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Stem Cell Innovation Could Treat Parkinson’s

A team of researchers from Rutgers and Stanford have created a new way to inject healthy human nerve cells into the brain that could someday help treat Parkinson’s disease and other devastating brain-related conditions that affect millions of people. The technology – a major innovation – involves converting adult tissue-derived stem cells into human neurons […]

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