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Feeding Behavior in Worms May Help Shed Light on Human Heart Function

August 1, 2015

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Feeding Behavior in Worms Could Shed Light on Human Heart Function

In a new study from MIT researchers reveal that a simple roundworm has the ability to spit out potentially deadly substances — a finding that could have surprising implications for human heart research. Tasting and spitting out toxic food is a survival trait shared by many complex organisms. To feed, the worm uses its pharynx, […]

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Yale Study Shows T Cell Lymphoma Caused by Gene Deletions

July 21, 2015

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Study Shows T Cell Lymphoma Caused by Unusually Large Number of Gene Deletions

A newly published study from Yale University shows that a deadly form of T cell lymphoma is caused by an unusually large number of gene deletions, making it distinct among cancers. Researchers conducted a genomic analysis of normal and cancer cells from patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, a cancer of T-cells of the immune system […]

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New Stem Cell Study May Lead to New Drug Targets for Autism Treatment

July 17, 2015

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New Stem Cell Study Could Help Predict ASD

Using stem cells generated from skin biopsies of four patients with ASD, researchers from Yale University grew the stem cells into three-dimensional simulated miniature human brains to compare gene expression between the patients and their family members. A larger head size — or macrocephaly — is seen in many children with severe autism spectrum disorder […]

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How Scent and Nectar Influence Pollinators and Herbivores

July 13, 2015

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Flowers Use Scent and Nectar to Manipulate Pollinators

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology reveal how flowers use scent and nectar to manipulate pollinators and herbivores. Some pollinators not only provide fertilization services for flowering plants, they also lay their eggs on the plants’ leaves after they have visited the flowers. Voracious caterpillars hatch from these eggs and their enormous […]

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New Technique Uses Regenerative Capacity of Stem Cells to Eliminate HIV

July 6, 2015

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Stem Cell Gene Therapy Holds Promise for Eliminating HIV

Scientists at UCLA have developed a new technique that harnesses the regenerative capacity of stem cells to generate an immune response to HIV, showing that the technique decreased HIV levels in mice by 80 to 95 percent. Scientists at the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research are one […]

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Cancer Drug Prolongs the Life of Fruit Flies, Could Do the Same for Humans

June 30, 2015

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Cancer Drug Prolongs Life

Using a cancer drug called Trametinib, biologists have extended the life expectancy in fruit flies by around twelve percent. The researchers believe that the substance could be used to develop future anti-aging drugs to extend life expectancy in humans. Humans, yeasts and fruit flies began to evolve separately millions of years ago. Nevertheless, the cellular […]

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Study Shows Muscle Contraction May Contribute to Stroke Damage

June 29, 2015

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New Research Shows Muscle Contraction May Contribute to Stroke Damage

The precise regulation of cerebral blood flow is critical for normal brain function, and its disruption underlies many neuropathologies. Using optical imaging, researchers from Yale University found that capillary pericytes in mice and humans do not express smooth muscle actin and are morphologically and functionally distinct from adjacent precapillary smooth muscle cells (SMCs). An investigation […]

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Researchers Create Engineered Particles that Kill Harmful Bacteria

June 25, 2015

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In this illustration, phagemid plasmids infect a targeted bacteria.

Deadly to targeted bacteria, engineered particles known as phagemids have been created to fight bacterial infections with great effectiveness while eliminating harmful side effects of more traditional treatments. The global rise in antibiotic resistance is a growing threat to public health, damaging our ability to fight deadly infections such as tuberculosis. What’s more, efforts to […]

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New Drug to Quiet Brain, Relieving Epilepsy and Tinnitus

June 24, 2015

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New Drug to Quiet Brain, Relieve Epilepsy and Tinnitus

Overly excited nerve cells cause problems like epilepsy and tinnitus. A new drug that selectively affects potassium channels promises relief with fewer side effects. A new drug may treat epilepsy and prevent tinnitus by selectively affecting potassium channels in the brain, UConn neurophysiologist Anastasios Tzingounis and colleagues report in the 10 June Journal of Neuroscience. […]

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High-Fat, High-Sugar Diets Causes Bacterial Changes Related to Loss of Cognitive Function

June 23, 2015

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High-Fat, High-Sugar Diets Causes Bacterial Changes Related to Loss of Cognitive Function

Changes in bacteria making up the gut microbiome caused by high-fat and high-sugar diets appear related to a loss of cognitive function according to a study at Oregon State University. A study at Oregon State University indicates that both a high-fat and a high-sugar diet, compared to a normal diet, cause changes in gut bacteria […]

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Researchers Increase Energy-Burning Brown Fat Cells

June 17, 2015

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New Discovery Could Help Researchers Increase Good Fat in Patients

A team of researchers has discovered a way to increase energy-burning human brown fat cells and to make them more active, a discovery that could have therapeutic potential for diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic diseases. Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) scientists have found a way to both make more energy-burning human brown fat cells and […]

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Researchers Show How Mechanical Forces Affect Cell Function

June 16, 2015

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Researchers Show Mechanical Forces Role in Cell Function

New research from Yale University reveals how mechanical forces play an integral part in cell function. Nuclear membranes protect genes — life’s most precious cargo — but little is known about why they function in different tissue types. For instance, nuclei in brain cells tend to be soft and pliable while those in bone cells […]

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New Evolution Study Reveals Massive Genome Shift

June 15, 2015

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New Evolution Study Finds Massive Genome Shift in One Generation

By applying the latest tools of genome sequencing and analysis to preserved evidence from experiments carried out at Notre Dame in the 1990s, a new evolution study finds a massive genome shift in one generation. A team of biologists from Rice University, the University of Notre Dame and three other schools has discovered that an […]

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Pupil Diameter Linked to Task Performance

June 15, 2015

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Pupil Diameter Predicts Task Performance

Researchers from the Yale School of Medicine reveal how changes in the activity of individual neurons during performance of a task correspond exactly to the diameter of the pupil, showing signatures of high arousal for a wide diameter and low arousal for a small diameter. If you want to know who is ready to perform […]

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Study Projects How Climate Change Will Affect the Functions Birds in Ecosystems Worldwide

June 10, 2015

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Climate Change Will Affect the Functions Performed by Birds

New research from Yale University projects how climate change will affect the functions performed by birds in ecosystems worldwide. As changing climate reshapes the geographic range of thousands of bird species in the coming decades, ecosystems across wide swaths of the planet may be compromised, a new study warns. Based on environmental projections for the […]

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New Species of Horned Dinosaur – Regaliceratops Peterhewsi

June 5, 2015

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New Species of Horned Dinosaur

A newly published study details the discovery of a new species of horned dinosaur, Regaliceratops peterhewsi. About 10 years ago, Peter Hews stumbled across some bones sticking out of a cliff along the Oldman River in southeastern Alberta, Canada. Now, scientists describe in the Cell Press journal Current Biology that those bones belonged to a […]

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Key Areas of the Brain Develop Differently in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

May 29, 2015

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Brain Development During Adolescence in Bipolar Disorder

A newly published study from Yale University shows that key areas of the brain that help regulate emotions develop differently in adolescents with bipolar disorder. In brain areas that regulate emotions, adolescents with bipolar disorder lose larger-than-anticipated volumes of gray matter, or neurons, and show no increase in white matter connections, which is a hallmark […]

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Neuroscientists Identify Brain Circuit That Controls Decision-Making Under Conflict

May 28, 2015

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Scientists Identify Brain Circuit that Controls Emotional Decisions

A newly published study details how neuroscientists from MIT identified a neural circuit that controls decision-making under conflict. Some decisions arouse far more anxiety than others. Among the most anxiety-provoking are those that involve options with both positive and negative elements, such choosing to take a higher-paying job in a city far from family and […]

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