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New Yale Study Points to a Possible Treatment for a Rare Vascular Disease

November 29, 2016

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Study Reveals a Possible Treatment for a Rare Vascular Disease

New research from Yale University points to a possible treatment for a rare genetic disorder that affects blood vessels. In individuals with a rare genetic disorder that affects blood vessels, arteries and veins develop abnormal connections, causing bleeding in the skin, nose, and other organs. In most cases, the condition — hereditary hemorraghic telangiectasia, or […]

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Inhibiting the AIM2 Pathway Could Potentially Limit Radiation Damage to Cells

November 11, 2016

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Study Pinpoints Protein That Detects Damage from Radiation

New research from Yale University shows that a drug that blocks or inhibits the AIM2 pathway could potentially limit the deleterious side effect of chemotherapy or radiotherapy on cancer patients. High doses of radiation from cancer treatment can cause severe damage to cells and tissues, resulting in injury to bone marrow and the gastrointestinal tract. […]

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Study Shows A Widespread Disruption of Brain Activity During Absence Seizures

November 8, 2016

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Disruptions of Brain Activity in Absence Seizures

New research from Yale University shows that the entire brain is disrupted for 10 seconds or more at a time in absence seizures. Scientists believed that absence seizures — the brief loss of consciousness often mistaken for day-dreaming — was caused by a localized disruption of brain activity. A new Yale study finds the entire […]

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A Promising New Form of Immunotherapy for Cancer

October 27, 2016

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New Approach to Cancer Treatment

New research suggests a way to increase the staying power of CAR T cells, a promising form of immunotherapy for cancer. In people with chronic infections or cancer, disease-fighting T cells tend to behave like an overworked militia — wheezing, ill-prepared, tentative, in a state of “exhaustion” that allows disease to persist. In a paper […]

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Yale Develops New Gene Editing Strategy to Correct Mutations

October 26, 2016

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New Gene Editing Strategy to Correct Mutations

Using a new gene editing strategy, researchers from Yale University can correct mutations that cause thalassemia, a form of anemia. Their gene editing technique provided corrections to the mutations and alleviated the disease in mice, the researchers said. The finding could lead to studies of a similar gene therapy to treat people with inherited blood […]

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Two-Pronged Immune Response Destroys Tumors

October 24, 2016

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New Treatment Elicits Two-Pronged Immune Response That Destroys Tumors in Mice

Using a combination of four different therapies, researchers from MIT reveal a new treatment that destroys tumors in mice. Harnessing the body’s own immune system to destroy tumors is a tantalizing prospect that has yet to realize its full potential. However, a new advance from MIT may bring this strategy, known as cancer immunotherapy, closer […]

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Neuroscientists Identify Two Key Groups of Neurons That Help Regulate Appetite

October 21, 2016

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Scientists Identify Two Key Groups of Neurons That Help Regulate Appetite

In a newly published study, Scientists from MIT have identify two key groups of neurons within the hypothalamus that help regulate appetite. MIT neuroscientists have discovered that brain cells called glial cells play a critical role in controlling appetite and feeding behavior. In a study of mice, the researchers found that activating these cells stimulates […]

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STEP Protein Linked to Alzheimer’s May Also Play a Role in Schizophrenia

October 18, 2016

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Protein linked to Alzheimer’s May Also Play a Role in Schizophrenia

New research from Yale University shows that an increase in the STEP (STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase) protein leads to a disruption of synaptic function and contributes to cognitive disorders. A specific protein implicated in the cognitive decline of Alzheimer’s disease also appears to play a role in genetic predisposition to schizophrenia, meaning that a drug […]

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New Research Shows Female Hippocampus Structure Changes in Sync with Hormones

October 10, 2016

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Study Shows Female Brains Change in Sync with Hormones

New research from the Max Planck Institute shows that in women, in parallel to the rhythm of the level of estrogen across their menstrual cycle, the structures of the Hippocampus vary — a brain area that is crucial for memories, mood and emotions. Although it has already been known for some time that the brain […]

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Drepanosaurus – A Small Reptile with a Rearsome Finger

October 3, 2016

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Drepanosaurus a Cross between a Chameleon and an Anteater

A newly published study confirms that Drepanosaurus, a prehistoric cross between a chameleon and an anteater, was a small reptile with a fearsome finger. The second digit of its forelimb sported a massive claw. Scientists analyzed 212-million-year-old Drepanosaurus arm fossils that were discovered at the Hayden Quarry in Ghost Ranch, New Mexico. The researchers describe […]

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Memory Changes May Occur in Women Decades Earlier Than Previously Thought

September 28, 2016

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Study Shows Changes in Memory Tied to Menopausal Status

New research from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital reveals that reproductive stage, not simply chronological age, may contribute to changes in memory and brain function for women. Many women report forgetfulness and changes in memory as they transition to menopause. But studies that target participants who are 65 and older do not account for cognitive […]

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New Yale Studies Explore the Science of Cardiovascular Diseases

September 26, 2016

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Cardiologists Explore the Science of Cardiovascular Diseases

Yale University scientists detail how basic science research insights are key to future breakthroughs in cardiovascular disease. Professor of cardiology Martin A. Schwartz led two recently published studies that advance knowledge of the underlying biology of cardiovascular diseases, which are among the most common causes of chronic illness and death worldwide. The first study, published […]

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Genomic Regions That Set Humans Apart From Other Primates Carry Many Autism-Linked Mutations

September 22, 2016

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Autism and Evolution

New research from Harvard Medical School suggests that mutations in genetic regulatory elements may be important in both autism spectrum disorder and human evolution. Small regions of the genome where humans have diverged from chimpanzees contain a variety of mutations implicated in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, report Harvard Medical School researchers at Boston Children’s […]

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MIT Biologists Reveal How lncRNA Helps to Control Cell Fate

September 12, 2016

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Biologists Discover How RNA Helps Control Cell Fate

New research details how biologists from MIT deciphered the structure of one type of long noncoding RNA and used that information to figure out how it interacts with a cellular protein to control the development of heart muscle cells. Several years ago, biologists discovered a new type of genetic material known as long noncoding RNA. […]

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UCSD Researchers Use Adenosine to Command Stem Cells to Build New Bone

September 1, 2016

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Researchers Command Stem Cells to Build New Bone

A team of scientists from UC San Diego have discovered an easy and efficient way to coax human pluripotent stem cells to regenerate bone tissue — by feeding them adenosine, a naturally occurring molecule in the body. The stem-cell-derived bone tissue helped repair cranial bone defects in mice without developing tumors or causing infection. The […]

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Yale Scientists Discover a New Therapy for a Chronic Brain Disease

August 23, 2016

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Yale Biologists Uncover Marker for a Chronic Brain Disease

Yale scientists have discovered a new and effective therapy for cerebral cavernous malformations. A team of researchers led by Yale professor of pathology Wang Min have pinpointed a marker that contributes to a chronic condition affecting the brain. Known as cerebral cavernous malformations, the condition is characterized by a tangle of capillaries in the brain’s […]

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MIT Biological Engineers Program Human Cells to Store Complex Histories in Their DNA

August 22, 2016

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Recording Analog Memories in Human Cells

Newly published research details how biological engineers from MIT developed a way to record complex histories in the DNA of human cells, allowing them to retrieve “memories” of past events by sequencing the DNA. This analog memory storage system — the first that can record the duration and/or intensity of events in human cells — […]

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Scientists Show How Synapses Are Arranged with Respect to Each Other

July 19, 2016

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How Synapses Are Arranged with Respect to Each Other

For the first time, neurobiologists show that contact points between specific neuron types are clustered in groups on the target neuron. The cerebral cortex resembles a vast switchboard. Countless lines carrying information about the environment, for example from the sensory organs, converge in the cerebral cortex. In order to direct the flow of data into […]

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