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New Research Opens New Realms of Light-Matter Interaction

July 14, 2016

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MIT Study Opens New Realms of Light-Matter Interaction

A new study from MIT shows that some “forbidden” light emissions are in fact possible, and could enable new sensors and light-emitting devices. A new MIT study could open up new areas of technology based on types of light emission that had been thought to be “forbidden,” or at least so unlikely as to be […]

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Antarctic Ozone Layer Shows Signs of Healing

July 1, 2016

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MIT Scientists Observe First Signs of Healing in the Antarctic Ozone Layer

New research details the “first fingerprints of healing” of the Antarctic ozone layer. Scientists found that the September ozone hole has shrunk by more than 4 million square kilometers — about half the area of the contiguous United States — since 2000, when ozone depletion was at its peak. The team also showed for the […]

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New Equation Shows How Other People’s Fortunes Affect Our Happiness

June 17, 2016

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How Other People's Fortunes Affect Our Happiness

A new equation shows how our happiness depends not only on what happens to us and how this compares to other people.The team developed an equation to predict happiness in 2014, highlighting the importance of expectations, and the new updated equation also takes into account other people’s fortunes. The study, published in Nature Communications, found […]

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Dual-Phase Alloys Capable of High Strength and Ductility

June 1, 2016

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Alloys Overcome the Strength–Ductility Ttrade Off

Using a new strategy in the development of steel, scientists are able to create alloys capable of both high strength and ductility. For the steel industry, there may be a way out of the dilemma that has existed since people began processing metal. Scientists from the Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung in Düsseldorf (Germany) are presenting a […]

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Yale Engineers Develop a New Tool to Fight Dust

May 2, 2016

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Yale Develops a New Tool in the War Against Dust

Inspired by gecko feet, Yale researchers have developed a promising tool in the war on dust. Micrometric and sub-micrometric contaminant particles — what most of us call “dust” — can cause big problems for art conservators, the electronics industry, aerospace engineers, and others. These nanoparticles can prevent a cellphone from working or rob the vitality […]

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New Study Traces the Impact of Volcanic Activity on Climate Change

April 25, 2016

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New Research Traces the Impact of Volcanic Activity on Climate Change

A newly published study shows that for the majority of Earth’s history, continental arc volcanism has been the main driver of long-term climate variability. A geology-based analysis of Earth’s climate history over the past 700 million years provides evidence that climate change has occurred traditionally through slow shifts in the release of carbon dioxide — […]

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Zipf’s Law from Scale-free Geometry – Like Galaxies, Like Cities

April 18, 2016

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Zipf's Law from Scale-Free Geometry

Abstract: The spatial distribution of people exhibits clustering across a wide range of scales, from household (∼10−2 km) to continental (∼104 km) scales. Empirical data indicates simple power-law scalings for the size distribution of cities (known as Zipf’s law) and the population density fluctuations as a function of scale. Using techniques from random field theory […]

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Children of Older Mothers Are Healthier, Taller and Obtain More Education

April 12, 2016

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Children of Older Mothers Do Better

New research shows that the benefits associated with being born in a later year outweigh the biological risks associated with being born to an older mother. Children of older mothers are healthier, taller and obtain more education than the children of younger mothers. The reason is that in industrialized countries educational opportunities are increasing, and […]

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New Genome-Wide Analysis Links Marijuana Dependence and Major Depression

March 30, 2016

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New Study Links Genes to Marijuana Dependence and Major Depression

A newly published genome-wide analysis of more than 14,000 individuals has identified several gene variants that increase risk of cannabis dependence. The analysis also suggests that the genetic risk for dependence on marijuana is associated with a higher inherited risk of major depression. The new study is published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. The study […]

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MIT Study Shows Tiny Plankton Have a Big Effect on the Ocean’s Carbon Storage

February 2, 2016

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Tiny Plankton May Have a Big Effect on the Ocean’s Carbon Storage

New research from MIT and Bristol University reveal that microscopic, mixotrophic organisms may have a large impact on the ocean’s food web and the global carbon cycle. How do you find your food? Most animal species, whether they rummage through a refrigerator or stalk prey in the wild, obtain nutrients by consuming living organisms. Plants, […]

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Scientists Propose a New Method to Probe the Evolutionary History of the Universe

January 27, 2016

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Scientists Propose a New Method to Probe the Beginning of the Universe

New research from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics suggests that oscillating heavy particles generated “clocks” in the primordial universe that could be used to determine what produced the initial conditions that gave rise to the universe. How did the universe begin? And what came before the Big Bang? Cosmologists have asked these questions ever since […]

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Graphene Oxide Layers Deform Evenly Under Gentle Strain

January 21, 2016

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New Graphene Oxide Paper Changes with Strain

New research from Rice University reveals that graphene oxide layers deform evenly under gentle strain and that the mechanical properties of the material change depending on the rate of strain. The same slip-and-stick mechanism that leads to earthquakes is at work on the molecular level in nanoscale materials, where it determines the shear plasticity of […]

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Voltage-Controlled Switchable Material Could Enable New Memory Chips

January 20, 2016

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Switchable Material Could Enable New Memory Chip Design

A new thin-film material whose phase and electrical properties can be switched between metallic and semiconducting could lead to new memory chip designs. Two MIT researchers have developed a thin-film material whose phase and electrical properties can be switched between metallic and semiconducting simply by applying a small voltage. The material then stays in its […]

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Neuroscientists Identify a Protein That Allows Brain Cells to Dampen Their Sensitivity

January 18, 2016

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Scientists Identify Protein That Allows Brain Cells to Dampen Their Sensitivity

In a newly published study, neuroscientists from MIT identify a protein that allows brain cells to dampen their sensitivity. Strengthening and weakening the connections between neurons, known as synapses, is vital to the brain’s development and everyday function. One way that neurons weaken their synapses is by swallowing up receptors on their surfaces that normally […]

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New Device Harnesses the Energy of Small Bending Motions

January 6, 2016

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New Device Harnesses the Energy of Small Bending Motions

Using a new method based on electrochemical principles, engineers at MIT have developed a new device that could provide electrical power source from walking and other ambient motions. For many applications such as biomedical, mechanical, or environmental monitoring devices, harnessing the energy of small motions could provide a small but virtually unlimited power supply. While […]

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Engineers Develop New Lightweight Metal from Carbide Nanoparticles

December 24, 2015

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Magnesium Infused with Dense Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles

Using magnesium infused with dense silicon carbide nanoparticles, engineers from UCLA have developed an exceptionally strong and lightweight metal that could be used for airplanes, cars, mobile electronics and more. A team led by researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science has created a super-strong yet light structural metal with […]

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Researchers Improve Bulk Metallic Glass Nanostructures

December 23, 2015

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Guided Evolution of Bulk Metallic Glass Nanostructures

Scientists from Yale University have figured out a way to refine bulk metallic glasses to improve their electrochemical performance. Results of the research, based in the lab of chemical and environmental engineering professor André D. Taylor, are published in the December 22 issue of Advanced Materials. Bulk metallic glass (BMG), also known as amorphous metal […]

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Scientists Develop a New Class of Superhydrophobic Nanomaterials

December 10, 2015

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New Superhydrophobic Coating Protects Without the Price

Scientists at Rice University have developed a new class of superhydrophobic nanomaterials that might simplify the process of protecting surfaces from water. A material made by scientists at Rice University, the University of Swansea, the University of Bristol and the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis is inexpensive, nontoxic and can be applied to a variety […]

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