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What the World Thinks of Climate Change: Predictors of Public Climate Change Awareness and Risk Perception

July 27, 2015

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Study Reveals Predictors of Public Climate Change Awareness and Risk Perception

A newly published study reveals for the first time what the world thinks about climate change and why. The study shows major contrast in awareness between developed and developing countries. Using data from the 2007-2008 Gallup World Poll, conducted in 119 countries, an international team of researchers identified the factors that most influence climate change […]

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NASA Lab Results Reveal Recipe for Extraterrestrial Vitamin B3

July 24, 2015

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Astronomers Find Extraterrestrial Vitamin

New NASA experiments reveal that vitamin B3 and other complex organic compounds could be made in space and it is plausible that meteorite and comet impacts could have added an extraterrestrial component to the supply of vitamin B3 on ancient Earth. Vitamin B3 could have been made on icy dust grains in space, and later […]

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Nanoparticles and UV Light Clean Up Environmental Pollutants

July 22, 2015

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Nanoparticles Clean Up Environmental Pollutants

A new study from MIT shows how nanoparticles can clean up environmental pollutants, revealing that nanomaterials and UV light can “trap” chemicals for easy removal from soil and water. Many human-made pollutants in the environment resist degradation through natural processes, and disrupt hormonal and other systems in mammals and other animals. Removing these toxic materials […]

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Study Shows Greenland’s Undercut Glaciers Melting Faster than Thought

July 22, 2015

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New Research Shows Greenland’s Undercut Glaciers Melting Faster than Thought

In a newly published study, a team of researchers reveal that Greenland’s glaciers are likely melting faster than previously thought. Greenland’s glaciers flowing into the ocean are grounded deeper below sea level than previously measured, allowing intruding ocean water to badly undercut the glacier faces. That process will raise sea levels around the world much […]

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Researchers Discover a Group of Local, Inhibitory Interneurons in the Fruit Fly

July 21, 2015

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A New Type of Neuron is Responsible for Selective Motion Vision

A team of researchers has discovered a new type of neuron is responsible for selective motion vision in fruit flies. Motion despite immobility. The illusion of self-motion is created, for example, in an IMAX cinema with the help of large-format movies. This is possible, because the brain calculates self-motion from the visual surround moving past […]

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Fluid Shifts Investigation to Help Advance Journey to Mars

July 21, 2015

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Fluid Shifts Investigation Advances Journey to Mars

A research partnership between NASA’s Human Research Program and the Russian Space Agency is helping to prepare us for the journey to Mars. NASA and the Russian Space Agency (Roscosmos) are studying the effects of how fluids shift to the upper body in space and how this adaptation to space flight affects changes in vision. […]

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Impact of Ocean Acidification on Phytoplankton Communities

July 20, 2015

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Study Reveals Ocean Acidification May Cause Dramatic Changes to Phytoplankton

A newly published study from MIT and colleagues shows that ocean acidification may cause dramatic changes to phytoplankton communities, recealing that many species may die out and others may migrate significantly as ocean acidification intensifies. Oceans have absorbed up to 30 percent of human-made carbon dioxide around the world, storing dissolved carbon for hundreds of […]

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New Statistical Technique to Help Evaluate Sites for Offshore Wind Farms

July 17, 2015

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New Statistical Technique Yields Better Wind-Speed Predictions

Scientists at MIT have developed a new statistical technique that yields better wind-speed predictions than existing techniques do, saving power companies’ time and money in the evaluation of sites for offshore wind farms. When a power company wants to build a new wind farm, it generally hires a consultant to make wind speed measurements at […]

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Zhenyuanlong Suni – The Newly Discovered Feathered Cousin of the Velociraptor

July 16, 2015

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Newly Dsicovered Zhenyuanlong Suni Winged Dinosaur

Paleontologists working in China unearthed the fossil remains of one of the closest cousins of Velociraptor, but it looks just like a bird. This newly identified species of dinosaur (Zhenyuanlong suni) is the largest ever discovered to have a well-preserved set of bird-like wings. Short wings Researchers say its wings – which are very short […]

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Astronomers Believe There May Be a New Population of Circumbinary Planets

July 16, 2015

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Astronomers Present New Ideas on How to Find Compact Binary Systems

Newly published research from astronomers at Cornell University suggests that there may be a new population of circumbinary planets, which orbit around more-compact binaries (with periods less than a few days) and have their orbital axes misaligned with the binary axes. Sibling suns – made famous in the “Star Wars” scene where Luke Skywalker gazes […]

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Scientists Engineer Brain Cells to Produce Light

July 16, 2015

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Scientists Engineer Brain Cells to Produce Light like Fireflies

Neuroscientists from Brown University and Central Michigan University are working to make optogenetics even more powerful in the brain and beyond. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — The revolution that optogenetics technology has brought to biology — neuroscience in particular — could be transformed all over again if a new project getting underway at Brown […]

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Yale Study Links Climate Change to the Decline of Bumblebee Species

July 10, 2015

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New Yale Study Tracks the Impact of Climate Change on Bumblebees

A newly published study from Yale University links climate change to the decline of bumblebee species in North America and Europe. The study, published in the journal Science, found that bumblebee ranges are shrinking in the south and the insects are not moving north. In addition, some species are moving to higher elevations on both […]

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New Horned Dinosaur Species – Wendiceratops Pinhornensis

July 9, 2015

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Wendiceratops pinhornensis

Researchers discover a new species of horned dinosaur, Wendiceratops pinhornensis. Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology Dr. Michael Ryan co-led the discovery of a striking new species of horned dinosaur (ceratopsian) based on fossils collected from a bonebed in southern Alberta, Canada. Wendiceratops (WEN-dee-SARE-ah-TOPS) pinhornensis was approximately 6 meters (20 feet) long and weighed more than a […]

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New Timescale Firmly Implicates Volcanic Eruptions as the Dominant Drivers of Past Climate Variability

July 9, 2015

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Volcanic Eruptions Linked to Centuries of Cold Temperatures

A newly published study resolves the inconsistencies in the timing of atmospheric volcanic aerosol loading determined from ice cores and subsequent cooling from climate proxies such as tree rings and shows that large eruptions in the tropics and high latitudes were primary drivers of interannual-to-decadal temperature variability in the Northern Hemisphere during the past 2,500 […]

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NOAA Determines Radiation Risk of Underwater Aircraft Carrier

July 8, 2015

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Determining Radiation Safety for Sunken-Ship Archaeology

A team of researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration rediscovered the scuttled U.S.S. Independence, determining the radiation risk of exploring the underwater aircraft carrier. About 42 miles southwest of San Francisco and 2,600 feet underwater sits the U.S.S. Independence, a bombed-out relic from World War II. The aircraft carrier was a target ship […]

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New Research Shows Having Kids Later is Associated with Higher Satisfaction Levels

July 7, 2015

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Having Kids Later Results in Happier Parents

A newly published study from the Max Planck Institute reveals that the satisfaction levels of parents depend not only on the number of children they have, but also on the point in time when they start a family. “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way,” according to one […]

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Engineers Develop a New Slimmer Design for Invisibility Cloaks

July 7, 2015

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Invisibility Cloaks Get a Slimmer Design

A team of engineers from UC San Diego have developed a new design for a cloaking device that overcomes some of the limitations of existing “invisibility cloaks.” In a new study, electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego have designed a cloaking device that is both thin and does not alter the brightness […]

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Clinical Trials Show That Exercise is Not Universally Effective

July 6, 2015

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Study Shows Exercise is Not Universally Effective

A systematic review of 160 clinical trials of the cardiometabolic benefits of exercise shows that exercise significantly improved cardiorespiratory fitness and some cardiometabolic biomarkers, but the effectiveness of exercise varied based on participants age, sex, and health status. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — Everyone knows that exercise generally helps the cardiovascular system, but much […]

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