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MIT Study Shows Tiny Plankton Have a Big Effect on the Ocean’s Carbon Storage

February 2, 2016

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Tiny Plankton May Have a Big Effect on the Ocean’s Carbon Storage

New research from MIT and Bristol University reveal that microscopic, mixotrophic organisms may have a large impact on the ocean’s food web and the global carbon cycle. How do you find your food? Most animal species, whether they rummage through a refrigerator or stalk prey in the wild, obtain nutrients by consuming living organisms. Plants, […]

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Scientists Propose a New Method to Probe the Evolutionary History of the Universe

January 27, 2016

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Scientists Propose a New Method to Probe the Beginning of the Universe

New research from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics suggests that oscillating heavy particles generated “clocks” in the primordial universe that could be used to determine what produced the initial conditions that gave rise to the universe. How did the universe begin? And what came before the Big Bang? Cosmologists have asked these questions ever since […]

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Graphene Oxide Layers Deform Evenly Under Gentle Strain

January 21, 2016

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New Graphene Oxide Paper Changes with Strain

New research from Rice University reveals that graphene oxide layers deform evenly under gentle strain and that the mechanical properties of the material change depending on the rate of strain. The same slip-and-stick mechanism that leads to earthquakes is at work on the molecular level in nanoscale materials, where it determines the shear plasticity of […]

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Voltage-Controlled Switchable Material Could Enable New Memory Chips

January 20, 2016

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Switchable Material Could Enable New Memory Chip Design

A new thin-film material whose phase and electrical properties can be switched between metallic and semiconducting could lead to new memory chip designs. Two MIT researchers have developed a thin-film material whose phase and electrical properties can be switched between metallic and semiconducting simply by applying a small voltage. The material then stays in its […]

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Neuroscientists Identify a Protein That Allows Brain Cells to Dampen Their Sensitivity

January 18, 2016

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Scientists Identify Protein That Allows Brain Cells to Dampen Their Sensitivity

In a newly published study, neuroscientists from MIT identify a protein that allows brain cells to dampen their sensitivity. Strengthening and weakening the connections between neurons, known as synapses, is vital to the brain’s development and everyday function. One way that neurons weaken their synapses is by swallowing up receptors on their surfaces that normally […]

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New Device Harnesses the Energy of Small Bending Motions

January 6, 2016

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New Device Harnesses the Energy of Small Bending Motions

Using a new method based on electrochemical principles, engineers at MIT have developed a new device that could provide electrical power source from walking and other ambient motions. For many applications such as biomedical, mechanical, or environmental monitoring devices, harnessing the energy of small motions could provide a small but virtually unlimited power supply. While […]

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Engineers Develop New Lightweight Metal from Carbide Nanoparticles

December 24, 2015

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Magnesium Infused with Dense Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles

Using magnesium infused with dense silicon carbide nanoparticles, engineers from UCLA have developed an exceptionally strong and lightweight metal that could be used for airplanes, cars, mobile electronics and more. A team led by researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science has created a super-strong yet light structural metal with […]

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Researchers Improve Bulk Metallic Glass Nanostructures

December 23, 2015

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Guided Evolution of Bulk Metallic Glass Nanostructures

Scientists from Yale University have figured out a way to refine bulk metallic glasses to improve their electrochemical performance. Results of the research, based in the lab of chemical and environmental engineering professor André D. Taylor, are published in the December 22 issue of Advanced Materials. Bulk metallic glass (BMG), also known as amorphous metal […]

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Scientists Develop a New Class of Superhydrophobic Nanomaterials

December 10, 2015

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New Superhydrophobic Coating Protects Without the Price

Scientists at Rice University have developed a new class of superhydrophobic nanomaterials that might simplify the process of protecting surfaces from water. A material made by scientists at Rice University, the University of Swansea, the University of Bristol and the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis is inexpensive, nontoxic and can be applied to a variety […]

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Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Reveals Apollo 16 Booster Rocket Impact Site

December 3, 2015

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LRO Reveals Apollo 16 Booster Rocket Impact Site

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter views the Apollo 16 S-IVB impact site on the moon. After decades of uncertainty, the Apollo 16 S-IVB impact site on the lunar surface has been identified. S-IVBs were portions of the Saturn V rockets that brought astronauts to the moon. The site was identified in imagery from the high-resolution LROC […]

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Earth’s Geomagnetic Field Intensity is Double the Historical Average

November 24, 2015

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Geomagnetic Field Intensity is Double the Long-Term Historical Average

New research from MIT shows that the Earth’s geomagnetic field intensity is double the long-term historical average, indicating that the current field intensity has a long way to fall before reaching an unstable level that would lead to a reversal. The intensity of Earth’s geomagnetic field has been dropping for the past 200 years, at […]

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MIT Engineers Develop a Shockwave-Based Process for Desalination of Water

November 12, 2015

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New Shockwave-Based Process for Desalination of Water

Chemical engineers from MIT have developed an efficient shockwave-based process to treat salty, brackish or contaminated water to make it usable. As the availability of clean, potable water becomes an increasingly urgent issue in many parts of the world, researchers are searching for new ways to treat salty, brackish or contaminated water to make it […]

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Genetically Reducing AMPK Activity May Prevent Hereditary Hearing Loss

November 9, 2015

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New Genetic Modification May Prevent Hearing Loss

New research from Yale University reveals that genetically reducing AMPK activity delays hereditary hearing loss in mice. Hereditary hearing loss can worsen over time and lead to premature deafness. In a new study, a Yale-led research team successfully applied genetic modification to delay inherited hearing loss in mice. Led by professor of pathology and genetics […]

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New Chemical Compound Could Clear Up Cataracts

November 6, 2015

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New Chemical Eye Drops Could Clear Up Cataracts

A team of scientists has identified a chemical that could potentially be used in eye drops to reverse cataracts. Identified as a “priority eye disease” by the World Health Organization, cataracts — caused when the lenses of the eyes lose their transparency — affect more than 20 million people worldwide. Although cataracts can be successfully […]

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GRACE Satellites Provide New Way to Track Ocean Currents from Space

November 3, 2015

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A New Way to Track Ocean Currents from Space

Scientists have developed a new way to use satellite measurements to track changes in Atlantic Ocean currents. The finding opens a path to better monitoring and understanding of how ocean circulation is changing and what the changes may mean for future climate. In the Atlantic, currents at the ocean surface, such as the Gulf Stream, […]

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Researchers Use a Small Electric Charge to Control the Bubbles of Boiling Water

October 28, 2015

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Researchers Control the Bubbles of Boiling Water

For the first time, scientists from MIT have found a way to control the boiling process. The system could improve the efficiency of electric power generation and other processes. Boiling water, with its commotion of bubbles that rise from a surface as water comes to a boil, is central to most electric power plants, heating […]

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New Graphene Based Catalyst Shows Promise for Clean, Inexpensive Hydrogen Production

October 21, 2015

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New Catalyst Holds Promise for Clean, Inexpensive Hydrogen Production

New research from Rice University reveals that graphene doped with nitrogen and augmented with cobalt atoms has proven to be an effective, durable catalyst for the production of hydrogen from water. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour and colleagues at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the University of Texas at San Antonio and the […]

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Refueling at the Moon May Be the Best Option for a Piloted Mission to Mars

October 15, 2015

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Refueling at the Moon is the Best Option for Successful Mission to Mars

New research from MIT shows that stopping at the moon may be the best option for a piloted mission to Mars, revealing that fueling up on the moon could streamline cargo by 68 percent. Launching humans to Mars may not require a full tank of gas: A new MIT study suggests that a Martian mission […]

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