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CCNE1 Gene Turns Back Cellular Clock

May 22, 2015

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Researchers Discover Human-Specific Gene That Turns Back Cellular Clock

Yale researchers have discovered a gene that turns back the cellular clock, greatly aiding the reprogramming of mature cells. An exhaustive analysis of factors that allow mature cells to become like embryonic stem cells again has revealed a spliced form of a gene found only in primates that greatly aids the reprogramming of mature cells. […]

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Yale Researchers Illuminate Major Evolutionary Patterns of Snakes

May 20, 2015

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Researchers Generate a Family Tree for Living and Extinct Snakes

A team of researchers from Yale University analyzed snake genomes, modern snake anatomy, and information from the fossil record, generating a family tree for living and extinct snakes and illuminating major evolutionary patterns that have played out across snake evolutionary history. The ancestral snakes in the grass actually lived in the forest, according to the […]

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Brain Activity Predicts Weight Gain

May 20, 2015

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New Study Shows How the Brain Responds to Food Cues

A new study set to appear in The Journal Neuroscience illustrates that it is the way the brain responds to food cues when individuals are not hungry that predicts weight gain and that the reasons why people gain weight can be fundamentally different. The way the brain responds while sipping a delicious milkshake can predict […]

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Opah – The First Fully Warm-Blooded Fish

May 19, 2015

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New Research Reveals Opah as the First Warm-Blooded Fish

A newly published study reveals details about the opah – the first fully warm-blooded fish that circulates heated blood throughout its body. New research by NOAA Fisheries has revealed the opah, or moonfish, as the first fully warm-blooded fish that circulates heated blood throughout its body much like mammals and birds, giving it a competitive […]

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Drug-Resistant EGFR May Have “Achilles Heel”

May 19, 2015

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Two Experimental Drugs Show Promise Against Drug-Resistant EGFR

Researchers from Yale University have discovered a key structural difference in the drug-resistant form of EGFR that could lead to new strategies to combat the disease. Drugs introduced more than a decade ago that target mutations in a protein known as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) held the promise of personalized treatments for a […]

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Gene Expression Evolves Best Under a House-of-Cards Model

May 15, 2015

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Gene Expression Evolves Under a House-of-Cards Model

Using sophisticated modeling of genomic data from diverse species, scientists from Yale University have answered a longstanding question about which competing model of evolution works best. Their research suggests that the “house of cards” model — which holds that mutations with large effects effectively reshuffle the genomic deck — explains evolutionary processes better than the […]

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Galactic Cosmic Rays Can Cause Dementia-Like Symptoms During Extended Space Travel

May 14, 2015

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Study Shows Extended Space Travel May Warp Astronauts' Brains

A new study from UC Irvine shows that galactic cosmic rays can cause dementia-like symptoms, making extended space trips to locations such as Mars more difficult to accomplish. What happens to an astronaut’s brain during a mission to Mars? Nothing good. It’s besieged by destructive particles that can forever impair cognition, according to a UC […]

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Scientists Replicate the Molecular Processes That Led from Dinosaur Snouts to Bird Beaks

May 12, 2015

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Researchers Retrace the Bird’s Beak to Its Dinosaur Origins

Researchers have conducted the first successful reversion of a bird’s skull features, replicating ancestral molecular development to transform chicken embryos in a laboratory into specimens with a snout and palate configuration similar to that of small dinosaurs. Scientists have successfully replicated the molecular processes that led from dinosaur snouts to the first bird beaks. Using […]

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Yale Research Shows How Renalase Protects Kidney and Heart from Injury

May 11, 2015

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Study Details How Key Protein Protects Kidney and Heart from Injury

A newly published study from Yale University details how the protein renalase protects cells from the type of severe injury that could result in a heart attack or kidney failure. The finding may lead to new treatments that protect against those conditions. Dr. Gary V. Desir, professor of medicine, and fellow researchers at Yale School […]

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New Yale Video: Memory T Cells and Long-Term Immunity

May 7, 2015

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How Immune Cells Remember

This short video details why memory T cells are critical for long-term immunity. Yale associate professor of immunology Susan Kaech describes new mechanisms that underlie long-term immunity, which is essential for human health and vaccines. Her research was published May 7 in the journal Cell. Video produced by Kindealabs. Publication: Guoliang Cui, et al., “IL-7-Induced […]

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New Pathway for Passing Genetic Messages between Cells

May 4, 2015

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New Pathway for Passing Genetic Messages between Cells Discovered

New research from Yale University reveals a new pathway for passing genetic messages between cells. A Yale-led research team has described a novel pathway for the delivery of microRNA (miRNA), the tiny RNA molecules that can move between cells to regulate gene expression. The study was published on April 29 by PLOS ONE. Scientists previously […]

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Epithelial Cell-Cell Communication Crucial to Proper Kidney Function

April 30, 2015

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New Findings May Help Improve the Regeneration of Damaged Organs

Researchers identify molecules that help cells to pinpoint their position, allowing for the kidneys to function properly. For the kidneys to function flawlessly, millions of cells must be arranged precisely according to a specified blueprint. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad Nauheim and Philipps-Üniversität Marburg have now discovered […]

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TH17 Cells Convert from Pro-Inflammatory to Anti-Inflammatory

April 30, 2015

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Possible Therapeutic Strategy for Inflammation-Mediated Diseases

New research shows that TH17 cells can convert from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory, revealing a possible therapeutic strategy for inflammation-mediated diseases. A type of immune cell that promotes inflammation during the immune response, TH17, can convert into another type of cell that reduces inflammation, Yale researchers have found. The finding, published April 29 in Nature, points […]

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New Conifer Study Illustrates Twists of Evolution

April 29, 2015

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New Study Illustrates Twists of Evolution

A new study from Brown University examines a specialized pollination mechanism in conifers whose traits are linked through function but not development, exploring how integration influences patterns of trait evolution. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — A new study offers not only a sweeping analysis of how pollination has evolved among conifers but also an […]

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Modern Humans Triggered the Demise of Neanderthals

April 27, 2015

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Scientists Decipher the Demise of Neandertals

A newly published study reveals that Homo sapiens belonging to the Protoaurignacian culture may have been the ultimate cause for the demise of Neanderthals. Researchers from the University of Bologna, Italy, and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, analyzed two deciduous teeth from the prehistoric sites of Grotta di Fumane and […]

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Neuroscientists Show How Brain Cells Control the Flood of Information

April 27, 2015

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Controlling the Thalamus with Dynamic Synapses

Neuroscientists from Brown University show how cells in the brain’s cortex can either stifle or enhance sensory information incoming from the thalamus, thereby allowing it to focus on just some of the many sensory inputs it might choose to consider. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — We consider only some of the sights, sounds, and […]

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New Research Shows Odor Receptors Do Much More Than Pick Up Scents

April 21, 2015

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Scientists Shed New Light on Sensory Neural Development

New research from Yale University sheds light on sensory neural development and possible new ways to identify mechanisms that can repair damage to the central nervous system. Smell is the only sensory system with a back up, which throughout most of adult life forms new sensory neurons that express specific odor receptors. Now Yale researchers […]

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