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Ebola-Like Virus Safely Destroys Brain Tumors

April 17, 2015

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Virus Safely Destroys Brain Tumors

New research from Yale University details how scientists used a novel chimeric virus (VSV-LASV-GPC) containing genes from both Lassa and VSV to target and completely destroyed brain cancer without adverse actions within or outside the brain. Brain tumors are notoriously difficult for most drugs to reach, but Yale researchers have found a promising but unlikely […]

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Manipulating Cell Division Will Help Grow Trees Bigger and Faster

April 16, 2015

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Wood Formation in Trees Is Increased by Manipulating PXY-Regulated Cell Division

A newly published study details how to make trees grow bigger and faster, which could increase supplies of renewable resources and help trees cope with the effects of climate change. In the study, published in Current Biology, researchers from the University of Manchester successfully manipulated two genes in poplar trees in order to make them […]

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New Approach Halts the Growth of a Very Aggressive Form of Melanoma

April 14, 2015

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Stimulating Major Branches of the Immune System Halts Tumor Growth More Effectively

By stimulating both major branches of the immune system, researchers from MIT were able to halt the growth of a very aggressive form of melanoma in mice. The human immune system is poised to spring into action at the first sign of a foreign invader, but it often fails to eliminate tumors that arise from […]

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New Method of High-Resolution Whole-Brain Staining

April 13, 2015

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New Staining Method to Reveal Circuit Diagram of the Brain

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology have developed a special staining method that brings the reconstruction of all nerve cells and their connections within reach. Learning, it is widely believed is based on changes in the connections between nerve cells. The knowing which nerve cells is connected to which other nerve cell would […]

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Biologists Identify Vulnerability in Brain Cancer Cells

April 10, 2015

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Biologists Identify Brain Tumor Weakness

Researchers from MIT and the Whitehead Institute have discovered a vulnerability of brain cancer cells that could offer a new target for treatment of glioblastoma. The study, led by researchers from the Whitehead Institute and MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, found that a subset of glioblastoma tumor cells is dependent on a particular […]

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AZD05030 Restores Memory and Synapse Loss in Alzheimer Mice

April 2, 2015

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Experimental Cancer Drug Restores Memory

New research from Yale University reveals that the experimental cancer drug AZD05030 blocks damage triggered during the formation of amyloid-beta plaques, restoring synaptic connections and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s. Memory and as well as connections between brain cells were restored in mice with a model of Alzheimer’s given an experimental cancer drug, […]

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DNA Mutations Can Be Good in Brain Tumors

March 25, 2015

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Possible Personalized Treatments for More Aggressive Forms of Brain Cancer

New research from Yale University reveals that it may be possible to develop personalized treatments for more aggressive forms of brain cancer. DNA mutations can cause cancer but in some cases, more mutations may mean a better prognosis for patients. A Yale-led comprehensive genomic analysis of more than 700 brain tumors has revealed one such […]

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Researchers Identify a Vital Protein for Brain Development

March 16, 2015

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Researchers Identify a Vital Protein

Researchers from the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have identified a vital protein that can help determine embryonic development. A protein that is necessary for the formation of the vertebrate brain has been identified by researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) and Boston Children’s Hospital, in collaboration with scientists from Oxford and Rio de […]

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New Technique Offers Direct Stimulation of Neurons Without External Connections

March 13, 2015

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New Technique Could Lead to Long-Lasting Localized Stimulation of Brain Tissue

Using external magnetic fields and injected magnetic nanoparticles, a new technique developed by researchers at MIT could lead to long-lasting localized stimulation of brain tissue without external connections. This video shows a calcium ion influx into neurons as a result of magnetothermal excitation with alternating magnetic fields in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. Neurons on […]

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Aegirocassis Benmoulae Hints at Early Arthropod Evolution

March 12, 2015

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Aegirocassis Benmoulae Hints at Early Arthropod Evolution

Newly discovered fossils of an extinct sea creature named Aegirocassis benmoulae provide key evidence about the early evolution of arthropods. A presentation by Dr. Peter Van Roy describing a new fossil anomalocaridid from the Early Ordovician Fezouata Formation of Morocco. Dr. Van Roy is one of the authors of a new study that has shed […]

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New Research Shows How Early Human Ancestors Were Unique

March 10, 2015

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Researchers Show How Early Human Ancestors Were Unique

New research from Harvard University and colleagues from around the globe reveals that the teeth of early hominins grew unlike those of either modern humans or apes, suggesting that neither can serve as a useful proxy for estimating the age or developmental progression of juvenile fossils. For nearly a century, the debate has raged among […]

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GC-1 Turns White Fat Into Brown Fat

March 9, 2015

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Experimental Drug Turns White Fat Into Brown Fat

New research shows that the experimental drug GC-1 dramatically increases the metabolic rate, essentially converting white fat into a fat like calorie-burning brown fat. San Diego, California – An experimental drug causes loss of weight and fat in mice, a new study has found. The study results will be presented Friday at the Endocrine Society’s […]

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Hypothalamic Agrp Neurons Also Control Compulsive Behaviors

March 6, 2015

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Study Shows Hunger Neurons also Control Compulsive Behaviors

A newly published study from Yale University shows that in the absence of food Agrp neurons trigger foraging and repetitive behaviors in mice. In the absence of food, neurons that normally control appetite initiate complex, repetitive behaviors seen in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anorexia nervosa, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine […]

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Yale Maps Evolutionary Changes of the Human Brain

March 6, 2015

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Researchers Map Switches That Shaped the Evolution of the Human Brain

New research from Yale University reveals a detailed catalog of human-specific changes in gene regulation and pinpoints several biological processes potentially guided by these regulatory elements that are crucial to human brain development. Thousands of genetic “dimmer” switches, regions of DNA known as regulatory elements, were turned up high during human evolution in the developing […]

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Merlin Protein Promotes Effective and Rapid Wound Healing

March 5, 2015

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Merlin Promotes Rapid Wound Healing

New research from the Max Planck Institute details how the protein merlin regulates collective cell movement, promoting effective and rapid wound healing. Cells also follow a herd instinct, and they thereby communicate in a magical collective way. This is because a protein known as merlin, named after the mythical wizard of medieval England, plays an […]

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Scientists Discover a Gene for Brain Size

March 4, 2015

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Scientists Identify a Gene for Human Brain Size

A team of researchers has identified for the first time a gene (ARHGAP11B) that is only present in humans and contributes to the reproduction of basal brain stem cells, triggering a folding of the neocortex. About 99 percent of human genes are shared with chimpanzees. Only the small remainder sets us apart. However, we have […]

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Yale Develops a Faster and Less Expensive Way to Analyze Gene Activity

March 4, 2015

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A Faster and Less Expensive Way to Analyze Gene Activity

A newly published study details a method called modular, early-tagged amplification (META) RNA profiling that can quantify a broad panel of microRNAs or mRNAs simultaneously across many samples and requires far less sequence depth than existing digital profiling technologies. A team of Yale researchers has developed a simple method that could significantly reduce the time […]

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