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DNA Mutations Can Be Good in Brain Tumors

March 25, 2015

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Possible Personalized Treatments for More Aggressive Forms of Brain Cancer

New research from Yale University reveals that it may be possible to develop personalized treatments for more aggressive forms of brain cancer. DNA mutations can cause cancer but in some cases, more mutations may mean a better prognosis for patients. A Yale-led comprehensive genomic analysis of more than 700 brain tumors has revealed one such […]

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Researchers Identify a Vital Protein for Brain Development

March 16, 2015

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Researchers Identify a Vital Protein

Researchers from the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have identified a vital protein that can help determine embryonic development. A protein that is necessary for the formation of the vertebrate brain has been identified by researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) and Boston Children’s Hospital, in collaboration with scientists from Oxford and Rio de […]

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New Technique Offers Direct Stimulation of Neurons Without External Connections

March 13, 2015

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New Technique Could Lead to Long-Lasting Localized Stimulation of Brain Tissue

Using external magnetic fields and injected magnetic nanoparticles, a new technique developed by researchers at MIT could lead to long-lasting localized stimulation of brain tissue without external connections. This video shows a calcium ion influx into neurons as a result of magnetothermal excitation with alternating magnetic fields in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. Neurons on […]

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Aegirocassis Benmoulae Hints at Early Arthropod Evolution

March 12, 2015

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Aegirocassis Benmoulae Hints at Early Arthropod Evolution

Newly discovered fossils of an extinct sea creature named Aegirocassis benmoulae provide key evidence about the early evolution of arthropods. A presentation by Dr. Peter Van Roy describing a new fossil anomalocaridid from the Early Ordovician Fezouata Formation of Morocco. Dr. Van Roy is one of the authors of a new study that has shed […]

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New Research Shows How Early Human Ancestors Were Unique

March 10, 2015

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Researchers Show How Early Human Ancestors Were Unique

New research from Harvard University and colleagues from around the globe reveals that the teeth of early hominins grew unlike those of either modern humans or apes, suggesting that neither can serve as a useful proxy for estimating the age or developmental progression of juvenile fossils. For nearly a century, the debate has raged among […]

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GC-1 Turns White Fat Into Brown Fat

March 9, 2015

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Experimental Drug Turns White Fat Into Brown Fat

New research shows that the experimental drug GC-1 dramatically increases the metabolic rate, essentially converting white fat into a fat like calorie-burning brown fat. San Diego, California – An experimental drug causes loss of weight and fat in mice, a new study has found. The study results will be presented Friday at the Endocrine Society’s […]

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Hypothalamic Agrp Neurons Also Control Compulsive Behaviors

March 6, 2015

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Study Shows Hunger Neurons also Control Compulsive Behaviors

A newly published study from Yale University shows that in the absence of food Agrp neurons trigger foraging and repetitive behaviors in mice. In the absence of food, neurons that normally control appetite initiate complex, repetitive behaviors seen in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anorexia nervosa, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine […]

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Yale Maps Evolutionary Changes of the Human Brain

March 6, 2015

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Researchers Map Switches That Shaped the Evolution of the Human Brain

New research from Yale University reveals a detailed catalog of human-specific changes in gene regulation and pinpoints several biological processes potentially guided by these regulatory elements that are crucial to human brain development. Thousands of genetic “dimmer” switches, regions of DNA known as regulatory elements, were turned up high during human evolution in the developing […]

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Merlin Protein Promotes Effective and Rapid Wound Healing

March 5, 2015

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Merlin Promotes Rapid Wound Healing

New research from the Max Planck Institute details how the protein merlin regulates collective cell movement, promoting effective and rapid wound healing. Cells also follow a herd instinct, and they thereby communicate in a magical collective way. This is because a protein known as merlin, named after the mythical wizard of medieval England, plays an […]

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Scientists Discover a Gene for Brain Size

March 4, 2015

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Scientists Identify a Gene for Human Brain Size

A team of researchers has identified for the first time a gene (ARHGAP11B) that is only present in humans and contributes to the reproduction of basal brain stem cells, triggering a folding of the neocortex. About 99 percent of human genes are shared with chimpanzees. Only the small remainder sets us apart. However, we have […]

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Yale Develops a Faster and Less Expensive Way to Analyze Gene Activity

March 4, 2015

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A Faster and Less Expensive Way to Analyze Gene Activity

A newly published study details a method called modular, early-tagged amplification (META) RNA profiling that can quantify a broad panel of microRNAs or mRNAs simultaneously across many samples and requires far less sequence depth than existing digital profiling technologies. A team of Yale researchers has developed a simple method that could significantly reduce the time […]

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Study Shows How Quickly New Fat Cells Are Created

March 3, 2015

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Yale Study Shows How Created Quickly New Fat Cells Are Created

New research from Yale University looks at the creation and expansion of white fat cells, and how these fat cells are created. Once fat cells form, they might shrink during weight loss, but they do not disappear, a fact that has derailed many a diet. Yale researchers in the March 2 issue of the journal […]

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Antifreeze Protein Fights Frostbite in Mice

February 26, 2015

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Antifreeze Protein Fights Frostbite

A new study from Yale University shows that a protein that protects ticks from freezing temperatures also prevents frostbite when introduced in mice. This is the first study to demonstrate the protein’s ability to boost frostbite resistance in an adult mammal. The research was published February 25 in the journal PLOS ONE. Several animal species, […]

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Nanotubular Structures Enable a Direct Exchange of Nutrients Between Bacteria

February 23, 2015

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Bacteria Connect to Each Other Via Nanotubes

New research from the Max Planck Institute shows that some bacteria can form nanotubular structures between single cells that enable a direct exchange of nutrients. It is well-known that bacteria can support each others’ growth and exchange nutrients. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, and their colleagues at the […]

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Yale Neurobiologists Discover Surprising Trigger of New Brain Cell Growth

February 19, 2015

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Researchers Find Trigger of New Brain Cell Growth

A newly published study from Yale University shows that adult hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs) express vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) 3 and its ligand VEGF-C, which activates quiescent NSCs to enter the cell cycle and generate progenitor cells. Scientists have discovered that the human brain can produce new neurons, but exactly how those […]

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Marijuana Munchies: How the Appetite Center of the Brain Responds to Marijuana

February 18, 2015

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Marijuana Munchies How the Brain Flips the Hunger Switch

A new study from Yale University observes how the appetite center of the brain responds to marijuana, revealing what drives the hunger brought about by cannabis and how that same mechanism that normally turns off feeding becomes a driver of eating. The “munchies,” or that uncontrollable urge to eat after using marijuana, appear to be […]

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Scientists Find Link in How Cells Start Process Necessary for Life

February 16, 2015

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Researchers Find Link in How Cells Start Process Necessary for Life

While exploring whether a structured RNA molecule from a virus that infects eukaryotic cells could function in bacteria, scientists found that it could initiate protein syntheses – a process necessary for life. Aurora, Colorado – Researchers have found an RNA structure-based signal that spans billions of years of evolutionary divergence between different types of cells, […]

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