Biomarkers News

Study Shows Aspirin Use Lowers the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

January 9, 2017

0 Comments

Aspirin Lowers Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

New research led by the Yale School of Public Health shows that regular use of aspirin lowers the risk for pancreatic cancer by almost 50 percent. Researchers studied patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer at 37 Shanghai hospitals from December 2006 to January 2011. The 761 patients were interviewed in person about their use of […]

Continue reading...

New Yale Study Links Childbearing to Accelerated Aging

January 20, 2016

2 Comments

New Yale Study Links Childbearing to Accelerated Aging

New research from Yale University reveals the first evidence that childbearing may cause accelerated aging in women. The researchers tested 100 healthy postmenopausal women from five rural villages in southern Poland for biomarkers associated with accelerated aging. The study, conducted in partnership with researchers from Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow and the Polish Academy […]

Continue reading...

Titania May Provide False Signs of Life on Habitable Exoplanets

September 23, 2015

0 Comments

Titania Can Produce Abiotic Oxygen Atmospheres to Support Life on Exoplanets

New research from the National Institutes of Natural Sciences shows that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium (IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets, acting as a potential source of false signs of life on habitable exoplanets. The Earth’s atmosphere contains […]

Continue reading...

Clinical Trials Show That Exercise is Not Universally Effective

July 6, 2015

0 Comments

Study Shows Exercise is Not Universally Effective

A systematic review of 160 clinical trials of the cardiometabolic benefits of exercise shows that exercise significantly improved cardiorespiratory fitness and some cardiometabolic biomarkers, but the effectiveness of exercise varied based on participants age, sex, and health status. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — Everyone knows that exercise generally helps the cardiovascular system, but much […]

Continue reading...

A New Timetable of Evolution – Reappraisal of Hydrocarbon Biomarkers in Archean Rocks

June 4, 2015

2 Comments

A New Timetable of Evolution

New data show that the first single-celled organisms with a nucleus originated more than a billion years later than biogeochemical evidence had previously indicated. Contaminated samples have evidently created some confusion in the timetable of life. On the basis of ultra-clean analyses, an international team, including scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, has […]

Continue reading...

New Research Reveals Risk Factors Linking Low Birthweight to Diabetes

January 5, 2015

0 Comments

Study Reveals Risk Factors Linking Low Birthweight to Diabetes

New research from Brown University confirms that low birthweight predicts an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood and reports which intermediating biomarkers appear to be the best predictors. Providence, Rhode Island (Brown University) — Studies consistently show that people born weighing 6 pounds or less face an increased risk for type 2 diabetes […]

Continue reading...

Noninvasive Technique Measures Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

November 4, 2014

0 Comments

Laser Technique Measures Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Skin

A new noninvasive technique objectively measures fruit and vegetable consumption, helping nutritionists and medical professionals measure and improve the diets of children and adults. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables is linked to a variety of improved health outcomes, but accurately measuring consumption by self-report, especially with children, is challenging and can be of […]

Continue reading...

New Research Explores the Possibility of Detecting Biomarkers on Distant Planets

September 11, 2013

2 Comments

New Research Aims to Detect Biomarkers on Distant Planets

New research presented to the European Planetary Science Congress at UCL aims to explore how atmospheric biomarkers from faraway planets might be detected in the future. On Earth, life leaves tell-tale signals in the atmosphere. Photosynthesis is ultimately responsible for the high oxygen levels and the thick ozone layer. Microbes emit methane and nitrous oxide […]

Continue reading...

UC Davis Researchers Identify a Biomarker for Autism

July 15, 2013

3 Comments

Researchers Identify Biomarker for Autism in a Subset of Children

In a newly published study, researchers from UC Davis identify a biomarker for autism in a subset of children, finding that the mothers of children with autism were more than 21 times as likely to have the specific MAR antibodies in their systems that reacted with fetal brain proteins, or antigens, than were the mothers […]

Continue reading...

Length of Telomeres Predicts Susceptibility to the Common Cold

February 20, 2013

0 Comments

Researchers Identify Biological Marker That Predicts Susceptibility to the Common Cold

Researchers have identified a biological marker that predicts susceptibility to the common cold, finding that participants with shorter telomeres were more likely to become infected by the cold virus. PITTSBURGH – Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have identified a biological marker in the immune system that – beginning at about age 22 – predicts our […]

Continue reading...

Fossilized Crinoids Yield the Oldest Biomolecules Found Inside a Fossil

February 19, 2013

0 Comments

Fossilized Sea Creatures Yield Oldest Biomolecules

Researchers from Ohio State University have discovered the oldest example of biomarkers found inside a particular complete fossil. Columbus, Ohio—Though scientists have long believed that complex organic molecules couldn’t survive fossilization, some 350-million-year-old remains of aquatic sea creatures uncovered in Ohio, Indiana, and Iowa have challenged that assumption. The spindly animals with feathery arms—called crinoids, […]

Continue reading...

Study Reveals Link between Gut Bacteria and Autism

January 29, 2013

0 Comments

A Potential Blood Test for Autistic Patients

A team of scientists from Western University and the University of Arkansas have discovered a unique blood marker that shows a link between gut bacteria and autism in some children. Results of a recent clinical study by researchers from Western University and University of Arkansas reveal the presence of a unique blood marker, which may […]

Continue reading...

Bacterial Lipids May be a Window into the Geologic Past

July 26, 2012

0 Comments

gene may help bacteria survive in extreme environments

A newly published study from scientists at MIT describes their discovery of a bacterial gene that may explain the sudden influx of methane-eating bacteria at Deepwater Horizon oil spill and the resulting bacterial lipids that may help identify dramatic changes in oxygen levels over the course of geologic history. In the days following the 2010 […]

Continue reading...

Fiber Optic Probe Measures Carotenoids in the Skin

May 23, 2012

0 Comments

new technology that measures a biomarker by simply bouncing blue laser light off the skin

New technology that measures a biomarker by simply bouncing blue laser light off the skin provides fast, painless and highly accurate results. Based on resonance Raman spectroscopy technology, the device uses computer software and a flexible fiber optic probe that is held against the palm for about 30 seconds while the light interacts with carotenoids […]

Continue reading...

Breathalyzer Uses Nanotechnology to Reveal Signs of Disease

May 8, 2012

0 Comments

breathalyzer reveals signs of disease

Thanks to new to ceramics nanotechnology, scientists now working with a device that can test you for biomarkers when you blow into it. Using a sensor chip that is able to detect minute amounts of chemical compounds in the breath, the Single Breath Disease Diagnostics Breathalyzer instantly measures your exhaled breath, giving you a green […]

Continue reading...

Using Biosignatures to Distinguish Between Tuberculosis and Sarcoidosis

May 7, 2012

0 Comments

Using Biosignatures to distinguish between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis

New research shows that tuberculosis and sarcoidosis are not only similar clinically, but their biosignatures also have a number of elements in common and scientists at Max Planck Institute found only four microRNAs that are suitable for distinguishing tuberculosis and sarcoidosis patients. With a range of diseases, doctors need unique features which they can use […]

Continue reading...

Using House Mice as Biomarkers of Human Settlement

March 20, 2012

0 Comments

Harvest Mouse

According to new research, house mice (Mus musculus) are ideal biomarkers of human settlement as they tend to stow away in crates or on ships that end up going where people go. The published paper goes on to state that mice hitched a ride with the Vikings and set up colonies in areas such as […]

Continue reading...

Researchers Use Bioinformatics and Epigenetics to Aid Cancer Research

March 2, 2012

0 Comments

Bioinformatics and epigenetics

A computational epigenetics research group at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics in Saarbrücken is using software programs to rummage through the genomes of cancer patients in search for suspicious methylation patterns. They use these patterns in clinical diagnosis as biomarkers and combined with ingenious algorithms and statistical processes, researchers have developed an epigenetic biomarker […]

Continue reading...