Biology News

Yale Scientists Track the Development of the Embryo

January 2, 2017

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Researchers Track the Development of the Embryo

Scientists at Yale University have discovered a way to track the precise bits of RNA that control the development of the embryo into trillions of specialized cells in a living animal. The new assay, tested on the genome of zebra fish, allows scientists to pinpoint function of myriad of signals activated after fertilization. “The problem […]

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‘NoBody’ – A Microprotein on a Mission

December 5, 2016

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NoBody, A Microprotein on a Mission

Using a technique that has revealed more than 400 new proteins too tiny to be found by other means, scientists from Yale University have helped identify a novel, functional “microprotein” encoded in the human genome. One of those microproteins, called NoBody, is a molecular workhorse involved in sweeping out unneeded genetic material inside cells. Its […]

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MIT Chemists Reveal Bacterial Enzyme That Can Produce Biodegradable Plastics

November 15, 2016

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Chemists Discover Structure of Bacterial Enzyme That Generates Useful Polymers

Researchers at MIT have determined the structure of a bacterial enzyme that can produce biodegradable plastics, an advance that could help chemical engineers tweak the enzyme to make it even more industrially useful. The enzyme generates long polymer chains that can form either hard or soft plastics, depending on the starting materials that go into […]

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Inhibiting the AIM2 Pathway Could Potentially Limit Radiation Damage to Cells

November 11, 2016

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Study Pinpoints Protein That Detects Damage from Radiation

New research from Yale University shows that a drug that blocks or inhibits the AIM2 pathway could potentially limit the deleterious side effect of chemotherapy or radiotherapy on cancer patients. High doses of radiation from cancer treatment can cause severe damage to cells and tissues, resulting in injury to bone marrow and the gastrointestinal tract. […]

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Researchers Find Antibody That ‘Neutralizes’ Zika Virus

November 8, 2016

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Study Finds Antibody That ‘Neutralizes’ Zika Virus

A team of researchers has isolated a human monoclonal antibody that in a mouse model “markedly reduced” infection by the Zika virus. The antibody, called ZIKV-117, also protected the fetus in pregnant mice infected with the virus, the researchers reported today in the journal Nature. Zika is believed to cause microcephaly, unusually small heads, and […]

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Study Shows A Widespread Disruption of Brain Activity During Absence Seizures

November 8, 2016

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Disruptions of Brain Activity in Absence Seizures

New research from Yale University shows that the entire brain is disrupted for 10 seconds or more at a time in absence seizures. Scientists believed that absence seizures — the brief loss of consciousness often mistaken for day-dreaming — was caused by a localized disruption of brain activity. A new Yale study finds the entire […]

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Neuroscientists Identify Two Key Groups of Neurons That Help Regulate Appetite

October 21, 2016

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Scientists Identify Two Key Groups of Neurons That Help Regulate Appetite

In a newly published study, Scientists from MIT have identify two key groups of neurons within the hypothalamus that help regulate appetite. MIT neuroscientists have discovered that brain cells called glial cells play a critical role in controlling appetite and feeding behavior. In a study of mice, the researchers found that activating these cells stimulates […]

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New Research Provides Hope for Better Wound Healing for Diabetics

October 17, 2016

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New Hope for Better Wound Healing for People with Diabetes

New research from the Max Planck Institute could lead to the development of new wound treatment methods for people with diabetes. Diabetics often have to contend with wounds that heal poorly. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, the CECAD Excellence Cluster and the Institute of Genetics of the University of Cologne […]

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Yale Researchers Reveal Genes Behind Aggressive Ovarian and Endometrial Cancers

October 11, 2016

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Researchers Find Genes Behind Aggressive Ovarian and Endometrial Cancers

Researchers from Yale University have defined the genetic landscape of rare, highly aggressive tumors called carcinosarcomas, pointing the way to possible new treatments. The findings are published in the early edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Endometrial and ovarian cancers are the most prevalent gynecologic tumors in women, with over 76,160 newly […]

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Researchers Identify a New Way to Suppress Lung Tumors

October 3, 2016

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A New Way to Suppress Lung Tumors

A team of researchers has identified a new blocking mechanism that acts more like a dimmer switch and potently inhibits lung tumor cell growth. Lung cancer cell growth depends on certain proteins that require the addition of sugar molecule chains to become active. Scientists have long thought that the addition of these sugar chains is […]

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‘Marsquakes’ Provide a Potential Microbial Energy Source on Mars

September 19, 2016

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Evidence for a Potential Microbial Energy Source on Earth and Mars

New research from Yale University shows that rocks formed by the grinding together of other rocks during earthquakes are rich in trapped hydrogen — a finding that suggests similar seismic activity on Mars may produce enough hydrogen to support life. Researchers from Yale, the University of Aberdeen, and Brock University studied rock formations around active […]

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New T Cell Subsets Have Potential to Improve Cellular Therapy for Cancer

September 14, 2016

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Researchers Identify New T cell Subsets with Potential to Improve Cellular Therapy for Cancer

Researchers from the Yale Cancer Center have identified that two genes, NR4A1 and ABC transporters, mark a distinct subset of quiescent T cells within human tissues, and have developed methods to mobilize them into circulation for potential application in adoptive T cell therapy of cancer. The study is published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. […]

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MIT Biologists Reveal How lncRNA Helps to Control Cell Fate

September 12, 2016

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Biologists Discover How RNA Helps Control Cell Fate

New research details how biologists from MIT deciphered the structure of one type of long noncoding RNA and used that information to figure out how it interacts with a cellular protein to control the development of heart muscle cells. Several years ago, biologists discovered a new type of genetic material known as long noncoding RNA. […]

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UCSD Researchers Use Adenosine to Command Stem Cells to Build New Bone

September 1, 2016

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Researchers Command Stem Cells to Build New Bone

A team of scientists from UC San Diego have discovered an easy and efficient way to coax human pluripotent stem cells to regenerate bone tissue — by feeding them adenosine, a naturally occurring molecule in the body. The stem-cell-derived bone tissue helped repair cranial bone defects in mice without developing tumors or causing infection. The […]

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Study Reveals a Promising New Target to Treat Type 2 Diabetes

August 31, 2016

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Yale Study Reveals Protein to Target in Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists at Yale University reveal promising new target for drugs to treat type 2 diabetes. When the body’s cells don’t respond normally to insulin — a condition known as insulin resistance — blood glucose levels can increase, resulting in type 2 diabetes. Researchers have long known that insulin resistance is linked to defects in the […]

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Harvard Researchers Identify a Key Instigator in Lou Gehrig’s Disease

August 26, 2016

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Scientists Identify Instigator That Ignites Nerve Cell Damage in Lou Gehrig’s Disease

A team of scientists from Harvard Medical School has identified a key instigator of nerve cell damage in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorder. Researchers say the findings of their study, published in the journal Science, may lead to new therapies to halt the progression of the uniformly fatal disease […]

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New Reserach Reveals How Zika Virus Causes Fetal Brain Damage

August 24, 2016

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Yale Reserachers Discover How Zika Virus Causes Fetal Brain Damage

In a newly published study, researchers from Yale University report that infection by the Zika virus diverts a key protein necessary for neural cell division in the developing human fetus, thereby causing the birth defect microcephaly. The findings suggest that Zika virus might be susceptible to existing antiviral drugs that may prevent disruption to the […]

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Yale Scientists Discover a New Therapy for a Chronic Brain Disease

August 23, 2016

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Yale Biologists Uncover Marker for a Chronic Brain Disease

Yale scientists have discovered a new and effective therapy for cerebral cavernous malformations. A team of researchers led by Yale professor of pathology Wang Min have pinpointed a marker that contributes to a chronic condition affecting the brain. Known as cerebral cavernous malformations, the condition is characterized by a tangle of capillaries in the brain’s […]

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