March 13, 2012

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Using RNA Import to Repair Mutations in Human Mitochondria

mutations in human mitochondria

For the first time, scientists have been able to identify a way to correct mutations in human mitochondrial DNA by targeting corrective RNAs. The published report describes the role polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPASE) plays in regulating the import of RNA into mitochondria and with reduced PNPASE, unprocessed mitochondrial-encoded RNAs accumulated, protein translation was inhibited and energy […]

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March 13, 2012

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High Resolution 3D Printer Prints 5 Meters per Second

3D-Printer with Nano-Precision prints 285 µm racecar

Using “two-photon lithography,” scientists at the Vienna University of Technology developed a high-precision 3D printer that can print five meters in one second. The printer uses a liquid resin that contains molecules that are activated by a laser beam and harden at the precise spots where the laser beam is focused. Printing three dimensional objects […]

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March 12, 2012

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Desert Ants Need Very Few Landmarks for Orientation

Cataglyphis noda ants approaching their nest entrance

While studying desert ants, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology discovered that ants were able to use magnetism and vibrational signals in the absence of other landmarks to find their nest. Cataglyphis fortis also use polarized sunlight as a compass, count their steps and sense carbon dioxide produced by their nestmates’ breathing. […]

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March 12, 2012

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Deep Sea Worms Eat Archaea, May Play a Role in Greenhouse Gas Cycle

Archaea-eating worm

Scientists may have just found another step in the greenhouse gas cycle as they discovered the first animal known to consume Archaea, which is a single-celled microorganism that consumes the greenhouse gas methane. The family of deep-sea worms, Dorvilleids, has been found at cold seeps off Costa Rica and the West Coast of the United […]

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March 12, 2012

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Inclined Orbit to Improve Space Telescope Sensitivity

prototype NEXT engine

Dust and light from the zodiacal cloud in our solar system interferes with infrared, optical and ultraviolet observations. By placing a space telescope on an inclined orbit, scientists have found a cost effective way to reduce this unwanted illumination and can improve telescope sensitivity by a factor of two in the near-ultraviolet and by 13 […]

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March 12, 2012

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Gold Improves the Performance of Nanoparticle Fuel-Cell Reactions

fuel-cell technology

Fuel-cell technology is set to take a step forward as chemists have created a triple-headed metallic nanoparticle, FePtAu, which generates higher current per unit of mass than any other nanoparticle catalyst tested. In tests, researchers from Brown University found that the FePtAu catalyst reached 2809.9 mA/mg Pt and after 13 hours has a mass activity […]

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March 12, 2012

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Scientists Discover New Type of Extra-Chromosomal DNA

eccDNA

Scientists from the University of Virginia and University of North Carolina have discovered a previously unidentified type of circular DNA molecule occurring outside the chromosomes in mouse and human cells. The findings were published in the journal Science. The extra-chromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) is 200-400 base pairs in length and consists of non-repeating sequences and […]

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March 12, 2012

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Flu Infections and MRSA Combine into Lethal Cocktail in Maryland

MRSA-pneumonia-deaths

MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus can be even deadlier when it is combined with a virulent flu infection. It’s been reported that a family of five have fallen ill and three have died from MRSA pneumonia that took hold in the lungs and was inflamed by a flu infection. The patients were all hospitalized and had […]

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March 12, 2012

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3-D Image Shows How DNA Packs Itself into a “Fractal Globule”

DNA packs itself tightly into a structure known as a fractal globule.jpg

A new imaging technique is giving scientists their first three-dimensional view of the human genome and how DNA is packed inside cells. Research has shown that the DNA forms a structure called a “fractal globule,” which is capable of holding vast amounts of material while remaining completely unknotted. While it’s clear that DNA sequencing has […]

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March 12, 2012

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Pterosaur Rhamphorhynchus Being Eaten by Ganoid Fish Aspidorhynchus Fossilized

composite-pterosaur-ganoid

This incredible fossil, depicting a pterosaur in the process of being devoured by a ganoid fish, was recently showcased in a new study published in PLoS ONE. Pterosaurs aren’t dinosaurs, but flying reptiles of the Mesozoic era. Most of the fossilized specimens come from the Middle Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous periods. Many of the soft […]

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March 12, 2012

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A New Fiber Opens the Possibility of 3-D Displays Woven from Flexible Fibers

new fiber developed by Yoel Fink's group emits blue laser light only at a precisely controlled location

A team of scientists at MIT have developed a new light source from a fiber roughly as thick as a human hair. The fiber has a hollow core with a droplet of fluid inside, surrounded by alternating layers of materials with different optical properties, which emits light when the droplet receives energy. Most light emitters, […]

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March 12, 2012

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Colombian Volcano Nevado del Ruiz Has Increased Activity

nevado-del-ruiz-eruption smoke

The Nevado del Ruiz volcano in Colombia hasn’t erupted in over 20 years, but there are signs that point that it’s entering a more active phase. INGEOMINAS scientists did a flyover with the Colombian Air Force and discovered ash on the glacier, near the crater rim, and more ash on the eastern flank. This has […]

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March 12, 2012

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Rapidly Retreating Glacial Ice Leaves Species Threatened

retreating-glaciers-ecuador

The rapidly disappearing glaciers are altering more than the physical landscape, as a recent analysis suggests. Species that live in streams and rivers that flow from melting glaciers could start disappearing when half of the glacial cover in a region is lost. A team of scientists looked at the diversity of insect larvae in water […]

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March 12, 2012

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Thermonuclear Behavior of Neutron Star Bridges Gap Between Theory and Observation

illustration compares the size of a neutron star to Manhattan

Over the period of roughly one month, NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observed some 400 thermonuclear explosions on the surface of the neutron star T5X2. The x-ray spikes detected by RXTE and other spacecraft, showed explosions at different rates of accretion and at the highest rates, the strong spikes disappeared and the pattern transformed […]

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March 9, 2012

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New Type of Neutrino Oscillation Discovered at Daya Bay

Each antineutrino detector at Daya Bay is lined with photomultiplier tubes

After of tens of thousands of interactions of electron antineutrinos at Daya Bay, data revealed a new type of neutrino oscillation, which was measured with unmatched precision, and researchers believe this will lead to future understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. BEIJING; BERKELEY, California; and UPTON, New York – The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino […]

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March 9, 2012

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Amino Acids Found in Meteorites that Experienced High Temperatures

meteorite analyzed in the study at its collection site in Antarctica

While analyzing samples from carbon-rich meteorites with minerals that indicated they had experienced high temperatures, scientists found amino acids, which gives support to the theory that meteorites and comets assisted the origin of life. Creating some of life’s building blocks in space may be a bit like making a sandwich – you can make them […]

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March 9, 2012

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DnaK Identified as Key Player of Protein Folding

chaperone DnaK

A new published report from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry shows how different chaperones cooperate during the folding process. The scientists found that the Hsp70 protein DnaK binds to about 700 different protein chains as they are synthesized and mediates the folding of most of these protein chains. Proteins are the molecular building blocks […]

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