April 25, 2012

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Insect Protein Inspires New Materials to Treat Vocal Disorders

new materials modeled after the protein resilin found in insects.jpg

Superpowers aren’t unheard of in the world of insects. Feats of strength, sound and leaping ability are all made common by the naturally occurring protein called resilin. Now researchers at the University of Delaware believe resilin may be a key to unlocking the regenerative power of certain mechanically active tissues in humans. A one-inch long […]

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April 25, 2012

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Increasing Solar Cell Efficiency with Graphene

Graphene Boosts Efficiency of Solar Cells

In an effort to increase solar cell efficiency, scientists at Michigan Technological University are working on a cost effective method that adds graphene to titanium dioxide, increasing its conductivity and bringing 52.4 percent more current into the circuit. The coolest new nanomaterial of the 21st century could boost the efficiency of the next generation of […]

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April 25, 2012

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Examining the Brain Receptors that Bind to Opioids

Crystal structure of the mu-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist.

Through the use of high-energy X-rays, researchers uncovered the structures of some of the most intricate and challenging proteins ever analyzed and determined the composition of brain receptors that bind to opioids. ARGONNE, Illinois — Researchers and doctors have gleaned new clues to the molecular mechanisms behind some of the most addictive substances in the […]

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April 25, 2012

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World’s Largest Digital Camera (LSST) Gets Approval

artistic rendering of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

If you think your new 14 megapixel camera is powerful, take a look at the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Designed by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, once completed this 3.2 billion-pixel digital camera will capture about 6 million gigabytes of data per year for researchers. Having passed Critical Decision 1 from the DOE, construction is still […]

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April 25, 2012

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Working to Recycle Greenhouse Gases

catalyst of the methanol synthesis in the semi-automatic precipitation reactor

Scientists around the world continue to study greenhouse gas emissions and researchers at the Fritz Haber Institute discovered findings that could lead to the recycling of greenhouse gas that is produced when fossil fuels burn. There is now one less mystery in chemical production plants. For many decades industry has been producing methanol on a […]

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April 25, 2012

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Sombrero Galaxy Exhibits Dual Characteristics

Sombrero Galaxy's Split Personality

NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope revealed that the Sombrero galaxy, also known as NGC 4594, is one of the first known galaxies to exhibit dual characteristics, having both a round elliptical galaxy with a thin disk embedded inside. Located 28 million light-years away in the constellation Virgo, scientists’ hope these findings will lead to a better […]

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April 24, 2012

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Adult White Killer Whale Spotted in the Wild for the First Time

white-killer-whale-spotted

There have been sightings of white whales sporadically over the last few decades, but the only white killer whales (Orcinus orca) were young, including one with a rare genetic condition that died in a Canadian aquarium in 1972. A group of Russian scientists and students on a research cruise off Kamchatka made the sightings of […]

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April 24, 2012

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Cryosat Mission Took Detailed Data of Polar Ice Caps

cryosat-esa-ice-floe-arctic-circle

The ESA’s Cryosat mission has been watching the Arctic sea ice with a high degree of precision ever since it was launched in 2010 to monitor the changes in thickness and shape of polar ice. It’s taken two years for scientists to tackle the amount of data that Cryosat generated. They reported an unprecedented view […]

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April 24, 2012

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Increased Methane Gas Levels Found Over Cracks in Arctic Sea Ice

airborne study measured greenhouse gas methane coming from cracks in Arctic sea ice

As scientists continue to research and monitor greenhouse gas emissions, a new source of methane gas has appeared from cracks in Arctic sea ice. Conducted as part of the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) airborne campaign, this study was published in Nature Geoscience and describes how the team found increased levels of methane gas while flying […]

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April 24, 2012

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“Godzillus” Fossil Discovered by Amateur Paleontologist

Monster Discovered By Amateur Paleontologist

An amateur paleontologist found a mysterious fossilized specimen that may have once lived near the shallow seas that covered what is now the Cincinnati area. Believed to have been similar to a shrub, the fossil measures nearly seven feet long and over three feet wide and may be named “Godzillus.” For 70 years, academic paleontologists […]

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April 24, 2012

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Anthropologists Seek to Protect Chimpanzees of the Ugandan Jungle

Chimpanzee Sanctuary

This fifteen minute video shows how the presence of a Yale anthropologist and his colleagues from the University of Michigan help keep chimpanzees safe from the ravages of poachers in the Ugandan jungle. Deep in the Ugandan jungle, David Watts, Yale anthropologist and consultant for new Disney movie “Chimpanzee,” has studied the behavior of humanity’s […]

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April 24, 2012

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PAPupuncture Offers Long-Lasting Pain Relief

Pain relief with PAP injections may last  longer than acupuncture treatment

A new study from researchers at the University of North Carolina describes how they used PAPupuncture to deliver long-lasting pain relief by exploiting the molecular mechanism behind acupuncture. While working with animal models, the scientist found that by injecting PAP into the popliteal fossa, the Weizhong acupuncture point, pain relief lasted 100 times longer than […]

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April 24, 2012

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Realization of a “Gedankenexperiment”

four particles of light can be produced and manipulated

A new study set to be published this week describes how physicists at the University of Vienna demonstrated in an experiment that the decision whether two particles were in an entangled or in a separable quantum state can be made even after these particles have been measured and may no longer exist. Physicists of the […]

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April 24, 2012

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Cassini Views Objects Creating Holes in Saturn’s F Ring

Saturn's F ring

While studying images from the Cassini spacecraft, scientists discovered holes in Saturn’s 550,000 mile F ring. These holes, called “mini-jets” by the scientists, have filled scientists in on the behavior of Saturn’s F ring and show that the F ring region is filled with objects from a half mile in size to a hundred miles […]

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April 24, 2012

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Ames Laboratory Seeks to Make Science Fiction a Reality

model of a three-dimensional metamaterial

As researchers at Ames Laboratory aim to move innovations from the realm of science fiction closer to reality, they developed a method to evaluate different conductors for use in metamaterial structures that may lead to technologies with unheard of properties. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have designed a method to evaluate […]

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April 24, 2012

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Bismuth-Antimony Material Shares Graphene’s Unusual Properties

Thin films of bismuth-antimony have potential for new semiconductor chips

Just recently Rice University shared news of their 2-D Boron Nanotubes that have advantages over carbon nanotubes and now scientists at MIT have found another compound made from a thin film of bismuth-antimony that shares similarities and complementary properties to graphene. Graphene, a single-atom-thick layer of carbon, has spawned much research into its unique electronic, […]

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April 23, 2012

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2-D Boron has Potential Advantages over Carbon Nanotubes

two-dimensional boron has potential advantages over graphene

Scientists at Rice University used the notion of Swiss cheese to analyze the possible configurations of two-dimensional sheets of boron. They found that these 2-D sheets of boron, when rolled into tubes, could have a distinct advantage over carbon nanotubes since boron nanotubes are always metallic, avoiding the challenge of selecting a particular symmetry. When […]

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